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The Sous VIde Thread

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by ehkay, Feb 2, 2012.

  1. Piobaire

    Piobaire Well-Known Member

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    You're using a Bradley now? How'd the brisket turn out? I need to do one soon as it works so well for freezer meals for us during the work week.

    Yup, dino = beef spare ribs. I smoked some last year in the Cook Shack and they were awesome. If I can find a recipe, and get them into the sous vide Friday, I think I'll do it.
     
  2. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Well-Known Member

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    I use a couple of different things, depending on where we are. This was on the bradley. It was great. I cooked it at 220 until 190 inside, then lowered the heat to 180 and held it there for five more hours. Super tender but without any of the dryness you sometimes get. The rub I used was kind of fly by the seat of my pants, but it worked out well too.
     
  3. Bounder

    Bounder Well-Known Member

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    I know that this is conventional wisdom but I am not 100% sure it is accurate because I don't think you have to cook tender cuts a really long time. I suspect that even thick cuts of meat will get up to the correct internal temperature relatively quickly. The temperature is much lower than in an oven but the water is transferring heat a lot more efficiently than air.

    And once it gets to the correct temperature, you don't have to hold it there. As Piobaire pointed out earlier, the insides of roast and steaks are not typically contaminated so you don't have to hold it at temperature to sterilize. After all, you don't have to do this with a roast cooked in the oven. On the contrary, the goal is to have the center reach the correct temperature for just an instant.

    I see that there are thermometers you can buy to measure the internal temperature of your "subject" in real time. Has anybody tried this?



    Never sous vide, but on a grill, lots. 270F for 2 1/2 hours, dry rub, indirect heat. Add sauce and caramelize on high heat. I'm sure they would be even better at lower a lower temperature for longer, or properly smoked, like Matt's technique. But I don't have the patience and the above is quite good anyway.

    I don't know how well beef ribs would work sous vide I don't think a dry rub would be very effective. Plus, you really want most of the fat to render off for good ribs.



    Mgm is right. A low oven temperature and a digital thermometer make it nearly idiot proof, which is why I started to cook this way. It is almost impossible to screw up thick cut of meat if you use a digital thermometer and a 225F oven. Because it has been heated so slowly, the outside is only very slightly more cooked than the inside and the temperature will only go up a degree or two when it is resting. Not as precision as sous vide, but still pretty good. The downside is that it can be really hard to predict when something will be done, so planning dinner can be kind of a bitch.
     
  4. Aron

    Aron New Member

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    "I see that there are thermometers you can buy to measure the internal temperature of your "subject" in real time. Has anybody tried this?"

    I just read something worth remembering today.
     
  5. GraphicNovelty

    GraphicNovelty Well-Known Member

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    So, I'm an avid listener of America's Test Kitchen's podcast and they mentioned that in their easy grilled pork chops they include a mixture of Anchovy paste + honey to kickstart browning.
    I actually own the book with the recipe in it and the mixture is 1 tablespoon vegetable oil, 1/2 teaspoon pepper, 1.5 tsp honey and 1 teaspoon anchovy paste. You put about a 1/4 tsp on each side of the chop.
    I'm not going to be able to try it out for a couple days, but I'm curious if anyone's done anything similar or wants to try it out and report back. Does it work with only pork or would it be an all purpose browning-kickstarter for chicken, beef, etc.?
     
  6. MSchapiro

    MSchapiro Well-Known Member

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    I almost always use some kind of sugar for browning my steaks post sous-vide. Usually a little honey, balsamic reduction or molasses creates a really nice crust. Works well with chicken too.
     
  7. Reggs

    Reggs Well-Known Member

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  8. otc

    otc Well-Known Member

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    The lack of external controls just seems idiotic.

    My circulator has the ability to control via app...I haven't used it a single time. All I am doing is setting a temperature, a wheel is sufficient. I never need to vary it during a cook and I have like 5 different timers in my kitchen that I can use.
     
  9. MSchapiro

    MSchapiro Well-Known Member

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  10. Matty123

    Matty123 Well-Known Member

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    quiet here i see. anybody have recommendations for a time and temp on a country style BEEF rib. came across these at an Aldi grocery store and had to get them. bnless beef rib. thanks in advance.
     
  11. StyleMe

    StyleMe New Member

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    I use my connected Anova to schedule cooks to happen while I am at work so I come home to a meal ready to finish in less than 5 minutes and eat :)

    It is really helpful for the days where I have to stay late or on the rare occasion get to leave early, I can adjust when it starts cooking and view the results from anywhere.

    Even though I have the Anova I am really interested in the Joule,
     
  12. NaTionS

    NaTionS Well-Known Member

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    What do you do with the vacuum pouches before you start cooking? It's just sitting around in room temperature water all day?
     
  13. Piobaire

    Piobaire Well-Known Member

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    I don't do that for that very reason.
     
  14. otc

    otc Well-Known Member

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    You could put in in a vat of ice water. Or even just fairly cold water if you use a cooler as a cooking vessel, especially if you maybe pre-packed a bunch of bags and froze them.

    As long as the item isn't super sensitive to cook time, an extra hour or so should guarantee that the Anova melts the ice and gets up to temp.

    But last thing I want to worry about in the morning is getting dinner ready...
     
  15. saint

    saint Well-Known Member

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    The first Joules shipped today, can't wait to get mine and move the Sous Vide Supreme to backup duty.
     
  16. Piobaire

    Piobaire Well-Known Member

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    Btw, putting frozen things into the sous vide totally works. I've put frozen steaks steaks in many times and it works perfectly. I also sous vide up a bunch of duck confit in dinner size portions and toss them into the freezer. Then in the morning I'll toss a frozen bag into the sous vide and set to 160. Perfect when I get home from work.
     
    1 person likes this.
  17. Bounder

    Bounder Well-Known Member

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    I find this is one of the more actually useful things these machines can do. Cook the meat sous vide. When it's done, freeze it, still in the vacuum-sealed bag. When you want to eat, chuck it back in a sous vide bath at 120 degrees. The contents will get up to temperature very quickly, especially if it's relatively thin, like a steak. Then brown it as normal.

    I used to put way too much thought into what and when to thaw things. Typically, it would have to come out of the freezer the night before. And then it would still be at refrigerator temperature when it went into the pan. Using this method, I can go from decision to dinner in half and hour.
     
  18. StyleMe

    StyleMe New Member

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    You definitely don't do that. You put it in an icebath. Or you use forzen food (I also put ice in the bath even if it is frozen to be safe)

    I wrote a buyer's guide for connected sous vide cookers as well as vacuum sealers. Check it out here if you want to learn more about the topics.
     

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