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The Official Wine Thread

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by audiophilia, Jul 20, 2009.

  1. rahmanu1

    rahmanu1 New Member

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  2. indesertum

    indesertum Well-Known Member

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    What houses heavily age their champs on lees? I can only think of Krug, salon, and selosse.
     
  3. aravenel

    aravenel Well-Known Member

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    Crush does that shit too. Annoys me to no end. Biggest black mark against them in my book.
     
  4. gomestar

    gomestar Well-Known Member

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    idk. they've always been expensive.
     
  5. gomestar

    gomestar Well-Known Member

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    why does it matter? Krug and Salon are totally different in style.
     
  6. indesertum

    indesertum Well-Known Member

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    Are they? I thought they would be similar in style. How are they different? Is salon not fermented in oak? I know salon is a blanc de blanc from one village vs Krug gc which is a blend.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2013
  7. Piobaire

    Piobaire Well-Known Member

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    Gome is the Champs king here but l would say look to some grower Champs. Pierre Peters is a personal fav and part of it is due to sur lie.
     
  8. indesertum

    indesertum Well-Known Member

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    Interesting. I have a bottle of Pierre peters i haven't opened yet.

    I think sur lie is a little different tho. Sur lie just means the wine isn't racked whereas Krug leaves their champagne in the bottle before disgorgement for a long time.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2013
  9. Piobaire

    Piobaire Well-Known Member

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    I believe you are creating a distinction without a difference.

    http://www.kenswineguide.com/wine.php?word=66

    http://www.napavalley.edu/people/gvierra/Documents/Fundamentals_of_Enology_Class/SurLieAging.pdf
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2013
  10. indesertum

    indesertum Well-Known Member

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    Ah. Good thing i got this clarified before next week
     
  11. gomestar

    gomestar Well-Known Member

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    they taste different. way different.


    I know the big names by style. Things like "oak vs. non-oak" or "more age in bottle vs. less" or "70% pinot/30% chard vs. 50% pinot/50% chard" are irrelevent to me.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2013
  12. indesertum

    indesertum Well-Known Member

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    How do they taste different?
     
  13. gomestar

    gomestar Well-Known Member

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    both are rich and dense, but the Salon is brighter, the Krug is darker. IMO.





    if it helps you, Wine Spectator said the Salon offered hints of blanched almonds, while the Krug offered hints of smoked almonds. Fuck me.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2013
  14. indesertum

    indesertum Well-Known Member

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    Lol

    I don't think your wife would appreciate that but I'm down if you are
     
  15. gomestar

    gomestar Well-Known Member

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    it was a statement regarding the total stupidity of some of these tasting notes. Almonds are actually one of the better descriptors if one must use them, but apparently WS things the Krug has hints of crystalized honey (what is that??) and kumquats.
     
  16. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Well-Known Member

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    To me it's more like the difference between walking into a shop w/ freshly baked breads versus one with freshly baked pie dough. Subtle but distinct. But my experience with either wine is incredibly limited.
     
  17. gomestar

    gomestar Well-Known Member

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    i see them as more distinct that I suppose a novice would. They're distinct enough where I have a clear preference for one over the other, yet I love both.
     
  18. indesertum

    indesertum Well-Known Member

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    I was joking. I guess I'll have to try some day myself
     
  19. Slewfoot

    Slewfoot Well-Known Member

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    Glad you enjoyed it! Totally agree it was super funky on opening, but got much better.
     
    1 person likes this.
  20. chrisbunnington

    chrisbunnington Active Member

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    Sorry for taking so long to write back, I've been stuck at work for pretty much the entirety of the last two days.

    Anyways, I love a good Brunello but it (along with most of Tuscany, and, frankly, most of Italy) can be extremely frustrating to get a good grasp on sometimes. The size of the production zone and the number of producers have both absolutely exploded in recent years, which complicates things. There are some great producers out there, but there's also an ocean of wines that are in my opinion not very interesting, too international and not really authentic. Then you have that adulteration scandal a few years ago...

    Sangiovese is a grape with a lot of potential, but it thrives best in really specific conditions (ironic given that it's the most planted grape in Italy). There's a wide range of soil types and distinct climates in the Montalcino area and some of them are really not suited to the grape- Some parts of the zone are too hot, not quite elevated enough, or don't have the right mixture of soil types. Although there are sub zones that exist which have pretty distinctive characteristics, they have no legal definition and are almost never included on wine labels. What it comes down to is knowing producers and their styles, as there tends to be both a classic Sangiovese style that's a little more earthy and sinewy, less oak influenced and not quite as approachable, versus modern producers making riper, oakier and rounder wines.

    Try something from Il Poggione, they're one of the largest houses in Montalcino but in my opinion their wines make a great entry point, and shouldn't be difficult to find in most markets. Their wines tend to be accessible but authentic, and offer good value, from their normal Brunellos to their Riserva bottling. If you like it for its acidity, chewy tannins and subtlety, try something from Fuligni or Mastrojanni (a favourite of mine), or if you feel like splurging, go for something from Soldera or Biondi-Santi. I'd consider all of these producers to be more classic, maybe Fuligni slightly less so. If you think you'd like something more round, fruity and approachable, try something from Poggio Antico or Altesino. Those last two are less of my style, though.
     

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