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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. Munky

    Munky Well-Known Member

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    Jun 5, 2013
    Location:
    Wales, UK
    Thank you very much for this link, Chowkin. I realise that I may already have a pair of CS shoes - Herring Chaucer 11s. To this relatively untrained eye, they are beautifully made and very comfortable to wear.

    I note, with amusement, that there seems to be more fighting and falling out in the site you sent me, than on this one. I didn't know that was possible! Many thanks, Munky.
     
  2. Darell John

    Darell John Active Member

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    Aug 18, 2014
    Location:
    Singapore
    

    Thanks Patrick, your opinions are always valued.
    Makes sense to me, let me have a test and see how it works.
    Fingers crossed!
     
  3. rbhan12

    rbhan12 Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    New York, NY
    Guys, I need some help. I got caught in the rain and my brand new pair of Museum Calf shoes got some water bumps on them on the captoe. I've treated them twice with Saphir Renovator but haven't seen too much improvement in the bumps. Advice? I'm thinking of stripping the polish down to the leather and going from there. Please advise folks!
     
  4. atia2

    atia2 Well-Known Member

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    Feb 2, 2013
    

    I would let them dry (out of their bags) for a few days first, if you haven't done so already.
     
  5. whorishconsumer

    whorishconsumer Well-Known Member

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    Aug 12, 2010
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    I'll let the experts weigh-in, but from what I read when I discovered water damage on my calf-skin shoes is that the water/vinegar remedy detailed by Patrick at the top of this page is your best bet.
     
  6. Whirling

    Whirling Well-Known Member

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    Jun 6, 2015
    My feet tend to get hot and sweaty with little provocation. Any sort of plast, rubber, or artificial fibers seem exacerbate the problem.

    My narrow, low-volume, long arch feet mean I sometimes end up with footwear that could benefit from inserts. Also, some foot pain issues I have seem to benefit from inserts at times.

    My question is: "What inserts help to keep footwear from feeling warmer?"

    Rubber/plastic/acrylic don't seem great...

    Thick pieces of leather? Could I just buy some veg-tanned stuff and trim it to size?

    Some people claim wool (as in felt) keeps feet warm in winter and cool in summer, is this true?

    What about cork?

    Some type of thick cotton?
     
  7. ace13x

    ace13x Well-Known Member

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    My feet get sweaty when I wear cotton socks, but they stay remarkably nice and dry in Thorlo Boot Socks. Though, those are probably not the best option for dress shoes.
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. chogall

    chogall Well-Known Member

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    Bamboo.
     
  9. Whirling

    Whirling Well-Known Member

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    Have you tried bamboo insoles? Do you know of any specific good examples? Are they thick enough to take up some volume in the footwear?

    Thanks so much!
     
  10. chogall

    chogall Well-Known Member

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    Buy shoes that fits. If that fails, visit your local cobblers to make shoes fit.

    Or google for insole products.
     
  11. DWFII

    DWFII Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    The Highlands of Central Oregon
    

    This is where breathabilty really becomes an issue. there is no plastic rubber, foam rubber, neoprene or cork that will breathe--that will wick moisture away from your feet. Adding rubber insoles or rubber outsoles will only exacerbate the problem.

    Cotton socks will wick water away from the foot. But then it has to have a place to go. Inserts such as neoprene stymie the benefits of the cotton. I try to wear nothing but cotton but even expensive hose is "filled" with acrylics and nylon, etc..


    I don't know how that makes any sense. Cobblers are not shoemakers...generally speaking...they are repairmen--a noble enough trade but not to be confused with actually making. A cobbler ...esp. one who has never made a shoe...has only minimal insight into how a shoe should fit. Talk to them about heel to ball length or heel seat / treadline width and you're likely to get blank looks. Nor can a cobbler make a shoe fit.

    If it doesn't fit, it doesn't fit and there is little that can be done to make it fit. Any attempt...any attempt...to make it fit is almost certainly going to be a kludge.

    edited for punctuation and clarity
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2016
  12. Whirling

    Whirling Well-Known Member

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    How about just a thick slab of vegetable tanned leather? Would "shoulder" be the thing to ask for? 6-9 oz. in weight/thickness?
     
  13. DWFII

    DWFII Well-Known Member

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    The Highlands of Central Oregon
    

    If you must...yes. The thickness will be dependent on how much fill you need to make a "fit" that will never be a fit.
     
    1 person likes this.
  14. Nick V.

    Nick V. Well-Known Member

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    Nov 12, 2007
    

    We do this often. It's effective.
    We won't do this type of alteration through the mail because it may require a few fittings to get it best as possible.
     
    1 person likes this.
  15. Whirling

    Whirling Well-Known Member

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    Gentlemen, thank you for your help!
     
  16. DWFII

    DWFII Well-Known Member

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    Just so you understand...when you last a shoe, the unchangeable and unchanging foundation is the insole. It is formed and trimmed to the last before the shoe is lasted. Everything else must conform to it.

    And because it is a relatively thick and hard piece of leather it cannot subsequently be changed in any significant or non-destructive way. The insole controls and determines where your foot "seats" itself in the shoe. How the arch is supported or not and where the foot flexes relative to the "joint" of th efoot.

    There is something in shoemaking we call the "orange peel" effect. Imagine an orange...it has a circumference that is fixed. If you peel the orange that circumference no longer applies and in fact the orange is bigger around with its skin than without.

    The same is true when you add an insert of any kind into the shoe. Measurements in every direction are affected. The heel to ball measurement is changed it becomes longer, in effect, and your foot can no longer seat itself in the same place or position as when the insert is not there. Girths are reduced, toe clearance is reduced. The ability of the heel stiffener to cup your heel is reduced.

    Some of these are marginal and perhaps relatively bearable.

    But if the shoe fit you anywhere close to correct in length adding an insert can damage the foot as surely as stepping on a nail but more insidiously--over a longer and more permanent span of time.

    Just be aware / wary / informed--the measure of intelligence is not how much you know (or think you know) but how much you want to know.
     
  17. chogall

    chogall Well-Known Member

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    No one is asking a cobbler to make a pair of shoes here but to adjust the fit via different tricks from their tool bags.

    Shoemaking experience is not required to know if a pair of shoes fit. Nor a C.Ped. certification excluding the cases for prescriptions.

    There's always something that could be done. Always. But its better to get shoes that fit in the first place.
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2016
  18. Whirling

    Whirling Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for describing all of this for me, as well as other thread readers. I have no good reason for doing anything other than learn and save my pennies for a bit to buy a bespoke pair of shoes or boots.
     
  19. DWFII

    DWFII Well-Known Member

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    :fonz:
     
  20. Pierson v Post

    Pierson v Post Well-Known Member

    Messages:
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    Jan 24, 2016
    Location:
    St. Paul, MN & Palm Beach, FL
    Any suggestions how to remove this Sharpie name that someone wrote on these nearly new AE's?
    [​IMG]
     

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