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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. kbuzz

    kbuzz Well-Known Member

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    Any your two cents is truly appreciated. Thank you!!!

    Now the question is to start with the saphir reno mat or what appears to be a stronger deglazing type stripper called "decant"

    http://www.amazon.com/Saphir-Decapant-Stripper-Smooth-Leather/dp/B00D8EL0MC
     
  2. traverscao

    traverscao Well-Known Member

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    DW, I thought the use of creams and toying with lighter pigments would tend to keep the color, as one would desire, and slowly and meticulously, with time and polishing, develop that patina that one was so desire, instead of jumping to it too quick.

    Well, mimo, I don't know about you, but I'm not into the Kiwi cult, and if anything, I clearly stated that in the comment. And polishes being more expensive than shoes may sound ridiculous, but many people thrifted shoes cost THAT cheap and were still using Saphir or Glen Karen on them.
     
  3. traverscao

    traverscao Well-Known Member

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    Just to be on the safe side, go with Renomat. Decapant can be too powerful, if anything, and can over strip the leather.
     
  4. Branndonm1

    Branndonm1 Member

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    Very solid advice here. I agree, I think that the shoe itself is the problem. I mentioned that I picked them up on a sweet deal so I wasn't extremely worried about the quality of the leather. I wore them twice and I just wanted to just clean them up a bit with some polish but it's just been a nightmare since. I think that going for the darker patina look is the way to go and I really don't feel like investing more money into these shoes in order to get back that original color. What would you suggest I do? Let them dry to get rid of as much staining as possible and then just wear them as is? or should I try to touch them up with a brown shoe polish? I just want the coloration to look even, and less patchy.
     
  5. traverscao

    traverscao Well-Known Member

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    Brush them a little more, then, if this is what you desire. Brushing will even it out as time goes by.
     
  6. Branndonm1

    Branndonm1 Member

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    Yes I am thinking of taking your advice. I'm thinking of just brushing them out, letting them dry out, then using the tan polish so it at least darkens naturally as mentioned in one of your comments above. I really don't want to jump into a dark brown and have it look even more blotchy.
     
  7. traverscao

    traverscao Well-Known Member

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    Well, I mean, most of these issues can be resolve by wearing/brushing routinely for about three days to a week, and then you can go on from there, because, with those kinds of discoloration from using a product, it is best to brush and blend it in slowly, first, before one should reach out to the next step.
     
  8. TheFluffer

    TheFluffer Well-Known Member

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    Quick question mates, i've never seen or heard of anyone applying leather conditioner to the leather soles of shoes. I just watched a C&J video which the presenter said he does so.

    odd? necessary? or simply preference?

    [​IMG]

    Cheers.
     
  9. Munky

    Munky Well-Known Member

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    I have just read a bullet list, on Amazon, identifying the various features of Lexol conditioner. One point was 'rinses off easily'. Excuse my continued ignorance, but are you supposed to 'rinse off' the product after you have used it?
     
  10. traverscao

    traverscao Well-Known Member

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    Apart from the cleaner, which was essentially a soap, the water based content of Lexol Conditoner and Neatsfoot can be easily wash away with water, if that is what they were talking about.

    Again, apart from the soap, it is counter productive to rinse off the conditioner that you just spend the effort to put into.

    Hope that helps.
     
  11. Munky

    Munky Well-Known Member

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    The man in the Crocket and Jones clip does a few unusual things. He pushes shoe trees into the shoes, without undoing the laces. He doesn't take the laces out before polishing, he uses huge amounts of product and he polishes the soles of the shoes, as noted above. But...he is a reasonable big cheese in C & Js, so it seems likely that he knows a thing or two...
     
    1 person likes this.
  12. traverscao

    traverscao Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't condition the leather soles of my shoes with a cream consistency product. I'd use either Lexol, Bick4, or pure Neatsfoot oil, or even cod oil, as far as recently.
     
  13. DWFII

    DWFII Well-Known Member

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    I didn't watch the video...something about having to log in to a site I didn't want to belong to.

    It's probably worth repeating...for all those just coming to the question and the conversation....that anything you apply to leather outsoling which makes it soft is going to cause it to wear away quicker...water, oils, lanolin, conditioners. Some of these products will be occlusive. Most will be accumulative.

    Come to terms with the fact that leather soles are meant wear away and then be replaced--that's the genius of welted shoes.

    The best way to avoid the hassle of having to replace leather outsoles is to buy shoes with unit soles and throw them away when they've worn so much that they are out of balance and affecting your gait and health.

    Don't believe everything you read on the Internet...real, objective knowledge and experience matters. Associations matter. Credentials matter. There's more misinformation on the 'Net than insight...esp. coming from sources that make their living selling or seeking an easy profit.

    --
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2015
    1 person likes this.
  14. traverscao

    traverscao Well-Known Member

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    Dude in vid applied a neutral cream (squarish jar probably from Saphir) even to the sole, DW, which, I think is absurd. I can totally understand if he applies the cream to the fiddle back area because it takes little wear, but applying it to the ball area is simply absurd.
     
  15. mry8s

    mry8s Well-Known Member

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    Just paste this into any browser. You don't need to be logged in to Youtube.

     
  16. DWFII

    DWFII Well-Known Member

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    Thanks but is that the same video? Nothing mentioned about Crockett & Jones.

    FWIW, I didn't see anything controversial in this video although he is polishing new, unworn shoes and makers no mention of polishing the outsole when the shoes are worn--something that is both futile and often problematic in my opinion.
     
  17. Munky

    Munky Well-Known Member

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    DW, Are you sure you are looking at the clip that mry posted? The opening reads Crocket and Jones, then shows a long shot and close up of the C&J workshop and the man describes himself as the Paris manager for C&J...

    The shoes he polishes seem to have been worn...they have scratched soles that must be at least a few months old.

    I wonder if something happened in between the 'new' posting of the site and your opening it? The link, above, certainly does take you to the C&J's site.

    I wonder what your thoughts are about his putting trees into shoes with the laces tied and his using a huge amount of product. Surely these aren't good things to do?
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2015
  18. DWFII

    DWFII Well-Known Member

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    I don't know what happened. I clicked on the link in my email notification. I ended up at the Hong Kong Tatler video.

    I stand by everything I said in my original response to you.

    As far as putting the trees in while the shoes are laced...I dunno. Unless they are lasted trees, I don't think it makes any difference.
     
  19. EnglishShoes

    EnglishShoes Well-Known Member

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    I'm keen to learn more about Lexol and Bick4 which regularly gets mentioned on here.

    Are these the exact equivalents of Saphir Renovateur?

    I often use Renovateur on my calf leather shoes - are Lexol or Bick4 better in any way? Is it worth getting either of these if I already have Reno?

    Thanks
     
  20. glenjay

    glenjay Well-Known Member

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    I think what mimo was trying to say is that it doesn’t make sense to use high quality polish on low quality shoes.

    Clarks (the manufacture of the shoes in question) is one of the largest manufacturers of shoes in the world. The SRP of their men’s dress shoes range from $90 to $180 USD. Shoes in this range use lower quality (mostly corrected grain) leather and inherently have a thicker finish than non-corrected grain leather. These shoes are also mass produced in large factories where the quality control cannot meet the standards of a higher end manufacturer.

    Since this quality of shoe is not expected to last more than 5 years, it is a good candidate for a polish that is low in oils, contains gums, and a cheap solvent. At this level, shoe polish is not as relevant to the life of the shoe, and serves mostly as just a shining agent. Kiwi polish serves this purpose well.

    Shoes of higher quality materials and construction benefit from higher quality shoe polish, like Saphir and GlenKaren, because the ingredients can assist in the longevity of the leather of a shoe designed to last more than 5 years.

    I would also not recommend trying to strip the finish off of a lower end corrected grain shoe as the results could destroy the finish and the shoe.
    Please note that I have nothing against Clarks, they have always been nice to me when I’ve talked to them, and they certainly know their market.
     
    1 person likes this.

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