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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. JSlice26

    JSlice26 Member

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    Thanks, I will definitely grab a brush and cloth.

    I'm not sure the vinegar would win me any favors in an open office environment though, lol
     
  2. traverscao

    traverscao Well-Known Member

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    Oh well, save it for home then.

    A rag should be dampened before removing salts and impurities. Don't try to rub the rag dry on the surface. It won't remove much, and will leave a lot of lints behind.
     
  3. JSlice26

    JSlice26 Member

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    Yea, I look forward to hearing about it for home use.

    Thanks for the info!
     
  4. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Well-Known Member

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    I would never accept new shoes like that and wouldn't be up for a repair either. To patch a vamp costs probably what you paid for them. I have heard people having good experiences with Herring Shoes so I think they will take care of you.

    Saphir makes a salt removal product, I forget the name, but the issue with salt water is it is very alkaline so it makes the leather spew out the tanning agents and fatliquor. Using vinegar on salt stains helps lower the pH to acidic, which is where leather likes to be. After that conditioning with a product would be recommended because they leather starts to turn to rawhide at that point. You can see where salt stains can actually disfigure leather, this is what's happening. Best case for winter is wearing dedicated shoes, or boots that are earmarked for a beating.
     
  5. thefastlife

    thefastlife Well-Known Member

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    patrickBOOTH care to weigh in? Anyone else?

    [​IMG]
     
  6. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Well-Known Member

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    Well, first of all I wouldn't get a half sole unless the shoe had a pegged waist so that is your first mistake. Second, I would never wear a topy, so that's strike 2. Also, I would never want that ugly rubber heel, strike 3. What else can be said? Just wear them and ignore the bottoms? If you don't like this kind of work either send them to B.Nelson, or back to the factory for resoling.
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2015
  7. phototristan

    phototristan Well-Known Member

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    What are the best products to use on the inside leather lining of a shoe? How about on the leather sole?
     
  8. thefastlife

    thefastlife Well-Known Member

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    ooof, lol.

    well, i wanted a half sole b/c i want them to handle weather and they are work inspired, casual boots. the heel came from factory like that.

    i was more commenting about the work.
     
  9. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Well-Known Member

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    I don't do anything to the sole, anything that makes leather softer, will wear faster with abrasion (you know, like walking on the ground). Linings could use some vinegar when the begin to smell ammonia-like (this is the leather's fibers being shifted alkaline after the sweat beings to ferment) then you can apply Lexol, or another non-wax, or solvent based conditioner.
     
    1 person likes this.
  10. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Well-Known Member

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    It looks fine for what it is, but what do I know? "I'm a businessman, Jim, not a cobbler." In the future if you are picky, you can't be stingy. Sorry, pal.
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2015
    2 people like this.
  11. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Well-Known Member

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    The smell goes away unless you're dowsing yourself in it each day before going to work.
     
  12. DWFII

    DWFII Well-Known Member

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    I know "topy" is used generically here, but Topy and other products intended for the same application and use are typically 1.5 - 2mm thick. This looks like it's about 5 mm thick. Much of the problem there...and the potential problems...are related to that.
     
  13. thefastlife

    thefastlife Well-Known Member

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    i am confused. this isn't a Topy. this is a Vibram half sole. one that is often used on boots, specifically the Wolverine 1k Mile as shown here.
     
  14. sleepyinsanfran

    sleepyinsanfran Well-Known Member

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    Lexol (used sparingly) works great for the inner lining- it conditions and has fungicidal properties.
     
  15. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Well-Known Member

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    Does it have fungicidal properties?
     
  16. sleepyinsanfran

    sleepyinsanfran Well-Known Member

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    yes
     
  17. sleepyinsanfran

    sleepyinsanfran Well-Known Member

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    jojoba oil is another alternative for the inner linings (and better as a natural fungicide), but it migrates more, and is more expensive (unless you you buy imitation/synthesized jojoba oils which are cheaper, and kinda smell like lexol actually)
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2015
  18. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Well-Known Member

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    What's your source?
     
  19. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Well-Known Member

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    Or coconut, which isn't as thick, which is good for linings. Any heavy oil you risk making the lining somewhat occlusive, which is kind of counter productive to using a leather lining to begin with.
     
  20. DWFII

    DWFII Well-Known Member

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    My apologies...several people have seemed to be referring to it as topy when responding to you. I know it's not Topy (or a "sole protector" of any kind).

    Aand that's part of the problem--the worst aspect about the job is that if you add substance to the bottom of a shoe it needs to be added all across the bottom of the shoe. If you add 5mm under the ball you need to add 5mm under the heel...to retain the balance that the original shoe inherited from the last.

    Some cobblers topy a shoe without concerning themselves with such niceties but at least in theory even topied shoes should have an equivalent amount added to the heel stack.
     

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