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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. Gdot

    Gdot Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for following that all the way through to the end response from the manufacturer! That's dedication!
     
  2. patrick_b

    patrick_b Well-Known Member

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    Thanks guys, I'll try out some of these methods I've read about here on some old shoes.
     
  3. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Well-Known Member

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    I've read a couple pages on here and thought I would put my two cents in on a few topics. On Kiwi and silicone; Many shoemakers use the stuff and feel that it works better for them. I don't think I am one to argue with them. I know DWFII claims that silicone isn't really a bad thing for shoes. It does make sense, it is extremely inert, can put put inside of the human body without infection, so why not leather? Apparently cracking of leather is the drying out in between the microfibers of the leather particles. So can silicone provide that lubricant? I don't know honestly, but as Frtizl and many shoemakers say it is more about the quality of tannage than anything else.

    On wax removal; I have tried everything under the sun, and I really feel like Angelus Deglazer, and Meltonian Color preparer is the way to go. It is strong enough to get wax off with medium elbow grease. Using lighter things and more elbow grease seems to me a bit more damaging due to the excess friction you are applying to the leather. You end up literally "sanding" down the pores and such. The products I meantioned above use a dilluted acetone of some sort that strip well. After using them a good condition is in order. Speaking with Tony Gaziano about it he even recommends a hair drier on the shoe for a long while to melt it and then with a cloth literally wiping the excess wax off followed by conditioning and polishing.
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2012
  4. Liquidus

    Liquidus Well-Known Member

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    What's wrong with just using Saphir Saddle soap? I'm planning on buying one to use for taking off polish.
     
  5. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Well-Known Member

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    Don't use saddle soap, too harsh and won't get the job done as well.
     
  6. fritzl

    fritzl Well-Known Member

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    amazing, very well done. pity is, i have no clue how they looked before... ...fwock, who cares. excellent job. keep it coming.
     
  7. Liquidus

    Liquidus Well-Known Member

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    This is Saphir saddle soap though. According to previous posts here, it's designed for shoes. Saphir also makes a less harsh "cleaning soap" product. Personally, I like the idea of getting all my shoe care products from one brand that I can trust.
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2012
  8. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Well-Known Member

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    I just really don't think it is a good idea.

    It depends on what you are doing too. I mean renovateur by itself is a great cleaner/conditioner.
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2012
  9. Northampton Novice

    Northampton Novice Well-Known Member

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    I don't think it is...
     
  10. Gdot

    Gdot Well-Known Member

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    Thank you!

    Sorry the pics haven't turned out well. Will take more when we get a day with better light. As for befores they are the pair on the far right in this image. Just the plain old 'out of the box' finish from C&J benchgrade - which is pretty darned unremarkable. (But their benchgrade leather shines up great!)

    I still have the pair of loafers in the same original finish. When I take better pics I'll put them next to the refinished ones for comparison.

    .[​IMG]
     
  11. Gdot

    Gdot Well-Known Member

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  12. Liquidus

    Liquidus Well-Known Member

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    Just got my C&J Belgraves in the mail today. I assume that I should condition them asap, but should I apply a layer of wax over the shoe right away or should I wait until the creases set in?
     
  13. Northampton Novice

    Northampton Novice Well-Known Member

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    I'm sure it is, but for the sake of accuracy (or as some may say pedantry) I'd like to point out 1) Whilst Saphir Saddle soap, just as any other saddle soap, can be used on shoes, it is plain wrong to say it's specially made for shoes.

    2) The above link relates to the Avel Saddle Soap. Avel own the Saphir brand but it's not the same thing. The Saphir Saddle Soap is actually un-surprisingly branded Saphir.

    3) Not that it makes any difference whatsoever, but neither of these products is in fact part of the Medaille d'or range, but that's what the hanger project has them listed under.

    BTW Hermes also protect many of their leather bags with a water repellent spray, maybe you wanna give that a go too?
     
  14. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Well-Known Member

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    Just condition then polish.
     
  15. Northampton Novice

    Northampton Novice Well-Known Member

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    Two major functions of wax polish, firstly to provide a bright shine and secondly to give the leather a degree of protection from the likes of rain. If either of these is instantly important to you go ahead. If you prefer to wear them in first, you'll see where the creases set in and then you can largely avoid applying too much polish to those areas.

    When I used to mirror shine/bull my shoes, I would wear them in before wax polishing, to totally avoid areas where they crease.
     
  16. Gdot

    Gdot Well-Known Member

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    ..

    +1
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2012
  17. glenjay

    glenjay Well-Known Member

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    +2
     
  18. Gdot

    Gdot Well-Known Member

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    :wow:
     
  19. Liquidus

    Liquidus Well-Known Member

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    Can someone tell me what is causing this light strip of color on my shoe cap? The story behind what happened is this:

    [​IMG]

    I bought some Saphir wax in order to attempt a mirror shine on my Alden captoes. Not realizing that I need to wait a bit for each layer of wax to harden before rubbing it with a cloth, I put on 20+ layers of wax that did almost nothing. However, notice that the part of the leather closest to the cap stitching is pretty polished and no longer has the "grain" texture. I'm guessing that's because during my 20 attempted layers, I would rub there the least, giving the wax the most time to harden. Eventually, I realized my mistake and put on a few more layers, waiting between each one and I got the current shine. However, now I have this light streak in the middle. What is causing this and do I just need to remove the wax and redo to fix it?
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2012
  20. fritzl

    fritzl Well-Known Member

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    i read today that the renovateur was developed in cooperation with hermes to treat bags & belts to be slippery in the sense nothing can stick on them and they cannot be caught easily by doors, door handles, stair handles and the such...? in the case of belts it avoids to stain trousers in light colours for example.

    makes sense to me.

    imo, these explains the ability of SR to give a quick shine. in the long run it seems to be a rather expensive way to do it? am i wrong on this?
     

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