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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Mr. Moo, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. benhour

    benhour Well-Known Member

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  2. benhour

    benhour Well-Known Member

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  3. wurger

    wurger Well-Known Member

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  4. VegTan

    VegTan Well-Known Member

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    you're right, thank you

    http://mishoecare.exblog.jp/20294450
    [​IMG]
     
  5. David Copeland

    David Copeland Well-Known Member

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    Originally from Newport Beach - Now living in West
    Thanks so much for sharing the link and the great photos of your investment in time.

    Reading the full text of what you encountered is also a pleasure:


    [​IMG]

    It is no secret that I have a fondness for polishing shoes, despite the derision it elicits from some. Some find it to be an affectation to spend time polishing a pair of shoes, some find the mirror shine too obvious.

    But the reason I like a well polished, well worn shoe has a little more method than the madness that is peacockery. To me, there is something both luxurious and frugal about a shoe that has been well worn, but lovingly cared for.

    Luxurious in that it takes time, the greatest of all luxuries, and while it doesn’t require the most expensive shoe money can buy, the higher quality the shoe, the better the shine. It is a polished looked to accompany beautifully tailored clothing.

    But it is also frugal because, it is at heart a way of extending the life of a pair of shoes. Not for the grossly wealthy or newly made, it is empowering to the average man, because it takes a certain integrity of character to be able to have your shoes improving with age. It takes effort, and isn’t easily bought. Anyone with sufficient funds can go and buy beautiful shoes, but having them look better with each wear, with each year, is something that requires more consideration.

    So I polish my shoes, and find them getting better with each wear. As part of a wardrobe of tailored clothing in traditional weights of cloth, it is something I expect to grow with me, getting it’s own special patina with time.
     
  6. niklasnordin

    niklasnordin Well-Known Member

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    glad you liked it :)
     
  7. Mr. Moo

    Mr. Moo Well-Known Member

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    Bay Area, CA
    Alright guys, need some opinions. I have a very well worn pair of JL shoes that I have had for about 4 years. They appear to need a full sole replacement. I was thinking to either use B Nelson, or perhaps Perry Ercolino. I know Perry will be at least twice what B Nelson is, but is it worth it? Perry does bespoke resoling, so I figure his skill may be more advanced than B Nelson, but not sure if it's needed in my case.

    I would like the same style of sole on them (a thin rubber sole, for comfort).

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I guess these shoes prove that I don't simply wear shoes once or twice and then sell them... :D
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2013
  8. GothamRed

    GothamRed Well-Known Member

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    Why not a lobb resole/recraft? Cost?
     
  9. Mr. Moo

    Mr. Moo Well-Known Member

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    I think a Lobb recraft runs close to $500, and probably 1-2 months turnaround. I am keeping that as a last resort option.
     
  10. benhour

    benhour Well-Known Member

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    i would go with b.Nelson!! in kirby's blog says it was 168 with the shipping and used J&R soles!
    in photos his job looks really good!! i think Patrick can say more as he have an in persone experience with him!

    in my country sole leather has about 20euro/kg(this is about for 2-3pairs) so i dont think it worth pay 300$+ for resoling the only benefit resoling at JL is that they ll use the original lasts!! nothing more at my opinion
     
  11. chogall

    chogall Well-Known Member

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    Aug 12, 2011
    

    $450 classic $480 prestige AFAIK at JL.

    They look fine from the pictures for a normal resole.
     
  12. laufer

    laufer Well-Known Member

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    The cost of recrafting is ridiculous.
     
  13. pazzion

    pazzion Well-Known Member

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    Mar 20, 2012
    I gave my Meermin oxfords some love yesterday, since they seemed to be in dire need of it. This is only the third time that I tried getting a mirror shine, but I feel that it goes better and better. I mainly use the guide that Lear provided on one of the first pages in this thread.

    My work process:

    1. Clean with damp towel to remove dust and dirt,

    2. Brush with horse hair brush to remove remaining dust and lint from the towel,

    3. Apply renovateur with fingers to really massage it into the leather and let dry for 3-5 minutes before brushing,

    4. Apply Saphir creme (dark brown) to the whole shoe using an old t-shirt and let dry for 5 minutes before brushing,

    5. Apply a good amount of pate de luxe to the whole shoe and let dry for a couple of minutes before vigorous brushing to get a deep glow/luster to the whole shoe before going for the mirror on the toes,

    6. Start applying super thin (as in just dabbing your index and middle fingers - tightly wrapped in a microfiber cotton cloth - in to the wax without moving them around so that you barely get any wax on) layers of wax. I usually dab the fingers in the wax, swirl over the whole area so that I see it going slightly foggy from the wax and then apply one drop of water and continue to swirl. As the layers multiply I usually add another drop of water before going for another dab of wax,

    7. Do this until you are pleased with the result. It took me about 1.5h per shoe. As you go along and add more and more layers you will feel that the surface will start to feel smoother and smoother and then like glass (kind of like the screen on your phone). Start applying less and less pressure as this glass-like feeling start to appear,

    8. I finished off the whole thing by applying a super small amount of renovateur and swirling that in around the whole shoe. That helped remove small traces from my cloth and also to give the whole shoe a deeper and nicer luster.


    Before:
    [​IMG]


    After:
    [​IMG]

    They are a bit darker in color IRL, but the bright evening sky reflecting in the shoes made it impossible to capture the darker brownish/reddish color.


    Here are my C&J Tetbury's that I polished afterwards. I wasn't suppose to go for any kind of mirror, but after have gone through steps 1-5 I started applying a bit thicker layers of pate de luxe with rather hard and fast vertical strokes to the whole front of the shoe, and after just a couple of minutes they started to take a really good shine. I suspect that the leather on the C&J:s are a lot less grainy/have less cavities than my Meermins (though I have both the classico and linea maestro lines from Meermin and they both took about the same time for the same shine). So I worked on the Tetbury's for about 5 minutes each on step 6 (in contrast to about 90 minutes each on step 6 for the Meermins').

    [​IMG]
     
  14. wurger

    wurger Well-Known Member

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    Nice shine, but 1.5 hrs on a shoe!!
     
  15. benhour

    benhour Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    according to the steps i see you have read the thread!! nice work!![​IMG]

    btw 1,5 hrs is extremely long time for a mirror shine!! i think for the first 2 layers you have to take a lot more wax than you do!! it ll speed up a lot the whole process!!! hope i helped a little bit
     
  16. clee1982

    clee1982 Well-Known Member

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    Nice, but I wouldn't spend 1.5 hr a pair...
     
  17. pazzion

    pazzion Well-Known Member

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    Mar 20, 2012
    
    Thanks! I'll try that next time. I think that maybe is one of the reasons the shine came so much faster on the C&J:s.
    Thanks. Yeah well, I had an afternoon off with nothing to do so I spent it on the shoes. The Meermins' were really rough to the touch when I started so it took quite a while before I had filled all the pores. Plus it's really quite the meditation.
     
  18. cbfn

    cbfn Well-Known Member

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    FTFY...
     
  19. phototristan

    phototristan Well-Known Member

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    Oct 28, 2010
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    SF Bay Area
    Anyone know what's the difference between the blue and gold Saphir line and the Black Medaille D'Or line of polishes and Renovateur?
     
  20. JDMills

    JDMills Well-Known Member

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    Oct 8, 2010
    ^^ for the JL above, you should have had those reheeled when you wore through the rubber bit, now the whole heel stack has to be replaced so its gonna cost more, but b Nelson does a great job.

    And for the sole with a hole, my cobbler says never put a topy on a sole with a hole, you need a resole then a topy. If you don't want to do it properly dont do it at all (his words not mine).
     

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