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The Home Ownership Thread

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Douglas, Jan 31, 2012.

  1. Ataturk

    Ataturk Well-Known Member

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    Can't look at the pictures at the moment, but if money's the main problem, do it yourself. No need to pay someone $5 a square foot (or more) for labor. The tools you need aren't expensive and you can spread the work out over time if it's too demanding. Try to do it so you finish off a can of the adhesive when you stop (it doesn't keep long after being opened). Having help is nice, but it's not necessary. Count on your back being sore on Monday, though.

    That's with the caveat that I would recommend buying all the wood at the same time, if the rooms are connected, otherwise you'll have problems with transitioning and matching finishes.
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2014
  2. VLSI

    VLSI Well-Known Member

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    Alright, I'll have to research this more. It would be good to learn these skills, my dad just says pay people when I ask about things :confused: Can I at least buy wood for the third room at a later date since it's far away? Where is best place to buy? Is lowes/hd as good as anyone else?
     
  3. Ataturk

    Ataturk Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, it's basically all the same. As far as I know all the stores sell wood flooring made from a couple companies, under a myriad of brand names.

    Basically what you want to look for with engineered is a thick wear layer and long random lengths. Most are about 4' max, which is OK; you'll pay a premium for longer boards. Width of boards depends on your preference. Likewise with the finish, but you should get prefinished wood.

    A relative of mine owns a carpet store, and she says they don't make any money selling wood, just on the installation. Last time I got some, it was from Home Depot.
     
  4. aravenel

    aravenel Well-Known Member

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    How does engineered wood age? I've always worried that, like shoes, it would wear out rather than wear in.
     
  5. VLSI

    VLSI Well-Known Member

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    Thanks.

    Heres most of the pics. Pain to transfer thrm over on my phone :)
    [​IMG]
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  6. Ataturk

    Ataturk Well-Known Member

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    If you have a choice between engineered and solid wood, go with solid wood. But if you're installing on concrete you really don't.

    The aluminum oxide finish on engineered wood is much harder than any finish you can apply after a floor is installed, so engineered wood is pretty darn durable. But you really can't sand it much (depends on the wear layer), so your options for refinishing are limited. You're unlikely to wear through the wood layer by walking on it or dropping something, though.
     
  7. aravenel

    aravenel Well-Known Member

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    Does it get a patina as it ages though? Or does it just start to look old-and-busted-up?
     
  8. VLSI

    VLSI Well-Known Member

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    No one here uses real hardwood. I'm not 100% sure why, something with humidityand expansion (which I thought we basically didn't have in AZ so i dont get the concern). Will be over concrete though so that settles it.
     
  9. Ataturk

    Ataturk Well-Known Member

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    It stays looking new longer, so damage is more conspicuous, yeah. And it's intended to eventually be replaced. You'll never see someone boasting about 100-year-old engineered wood floors.
     
  10. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Well-Known Member

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    I like the charm of tung oiled wood floors after some use.

    Some of the engineered floors have a 5/16" thick wear layer, I don't see that wearing out without a great many resurfacings.
     
  11. Ataturk

    Ataturk Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't be surprised if such a thing exists, but most engineered wood floors are only 3/8" thick, total, with the wear layer (IIRC) just 2mm.

    I suppose you could prefer thicker wood, but it's nice to have the floor flush with the rest of the house and not have to trim doorjambs, remove moulding, etc.
     
  12. idfnl

    idfnl Well-Known Member

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    This. It steals a 1/2 of height from the room but is pretty efficient, the cold from the floor doesn't transmit.




    I have tung oil. I'd never use poly-type products again. They make the floor look like plastic.




    Why not consider reclaimed solid boards?

    Are you talking about pre-finished engineered? Those look super cheap.
     
  13. VLSI

    VLSI Well-Known Member

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    Lol.. just talked to my dad. Told me to get a quote for having floating floor installed :plain:

    Some of the textured engineered woods do look really cheap, but I find the smooth ones (not pergo smooth of course) aren't nearly as bad.
     
  14. lefty

    lefty Well-Known Member

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  15. VLSI

    VLSI Well-Known Member

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    So next question, what color do you guys think works in this space? Door and blinds are dark, don't think that matters though? Seems like lighter color would lend itself better to the tile and walls.
     
  16. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Well-Known Member

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    If you are married to the wall color and want to keep the blinds I think the lightest wood that would look good would be red oak or natural cherry. I personally avoid rustic red toned woods like red oak and cherry because I feel they dictate the entire tone of your house and practically require darker colors for everything else.

    Walnut will look out of place in conjunction with a heavy amount of red-toned woods.

    If you want to go with a blonde wood like white oak, white ash, beech or maple than I think you'll have to consider white for the walls and changing the blinds to white linen roller shades.
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2014
  17. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Well-Known Member

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    How common is engineered wood flooring in construction these days?
     
  18. Ataturk

    Ataturk Well-Known Member

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    I imagine it's very common anywhere houses are built on concrete slabs. Solid wood expands and contracts too much to be glued to them reliably.
     
  19. VLSI

    VLSI Well-Known Member

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    Don't care about shades, but that's what's in the whole house, so could be a big expense. Color is Benjamin Moore HC-33, much less yellow in natural light and without my shit photography. It's on a lot of walls... so I don't really want to change that. Are you saying dark would work better? I really like dark woods, just wasn't sure how well it would match.
     
  20. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Well-Known Member

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    I would recommend you get swatches of white oak (oil finish), Sapele, and natural cherry.

    This depends somewhat on the direction you chose to take with the interior. If you want modern furniture in this house then I would lean toward white oak, if you want traditional furniture then Sapele and if you want shaker/country furniture then natural cherry.

    If you find yourself becoming dedicated to one style than you'll end up changing the wall colors and window coverings to better suite that style.
     

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