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The Home Ownership Thread

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Douglas, Jan 31, 2012.

  1. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Well-Known Member

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    You could go to the hardware store and buy a cheap, light light fixture and do your wiring experimentation on that.
     
  2. lefty

    lefty Well-Known Member

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    The main switch is a Crestron controller with six lighting zones as well as independent control for all the window shades. There's no fucking way I'm pulling that off the wall.

    Assuming I determine which are hot, (my circuit tester needs batteries) then is this simply a matter of all the hots together and all the neutrals together?

    lefty
     
  3. Ataturk

    Ataturk Well-Known Member

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    Are there any other light fixtures controlled by this switch, I mean, any other lights that come on when this one does?
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2014
  4. lefty

    lefty Well-Known Member

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    It's an island light so it makes sense to me that it's on a separate switch within the larger controller. Can't say for certain. Why?

    lefty
     
  5. Ataturk

    Ataturk Well-Known Member

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    There's different ways to hook up three-way switches, so we need to figure out where the wires are going, i.e., whether it's to one of the switches or to another fixture. That way we can figure out if the red is just a dead end (it could be a spare wire) or whether it's supposed to be connected to another red to act as the traveler. It could do something else entirely--but I don't think that's likely. But I'm not an electrician...

    It's probably safe to cap the red and hook a test bulb up like Matt suggested and see how it works.
     
  6. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Well-Known Member

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    When you pulled this out of the ceiling was everything capped off separately or were the blacks and whites capped together?
     
  7. lefty

    lefty Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, I guess I could try that without killing myself.

    I can't see the red needing another. There's no way one was pulled or not installed initially, and there was a working light not too long ago.

    lefty
     
  8. Ataturk

    Ataturk Well-Known Member

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    Based on everything you've said, I'm pretty sure that red doesn't do anything. I bet everything works fine with it capped off.
     
  9. Douglas

    Douglas Well-Known Member

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    Heat went out again, second time in a month. During a polar vortex, of all times.

    The guy came back to fix it today claimed it was a result of his repair from last time. I'm not sure I understood it all, but some emergency shut-off was reading wrong or was too close to the heat source, and therefore cutting off the furnace prematurely.

    At least it's warm in here now.

    Frustrating.
     
  10. aravenel

    aravenel Well-Known Member

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    At least he was honest enough to own up to causing it with his first repair.
     
  11. lefty

    lefty Well-Known Member

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    ^^^Maybe. If it helps the lines are tied off in circuit so the blacks are capped together, the whites are capped together and the red is capped alone.

    Power is running through the box.

    lefty
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2014
  12. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Well-Known Member

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    So the box might be a junction. Wondering what else it effects.

    Did you find some batteries for your tester yet?
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2014
  13. lefty

    lefty Well-Known Member

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    I guess I could disconnect it and see what doesnt turn on.

    Not yet.

    lefty
     
  14. VLSI

    VLSI Well-Known Member

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    How hard is installing your own hardwood flooring? Glued vs. floating? What's the best way to shop for this stuff? Don't know anything about it :(
     
  15. jbarwick

    jbarwick Well-Known Member

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    My handy stepfather installed wood flooring but I would say it took about 3x as long for him to do it as someone else to do it. A nail gun is a must.

    We currently have glued flooring in our townhouse and it has a lot of gaps where I think the people who had it installed, didn't wait for it to dry. Plus the glue got on a lot of base boards. Cannot recall who has floating flooring that I know.

    Can't help from a shopping standpoint but it did come up when we thought of replacing our glued flooring...it will cost about the same to remove the old flooring as it will cost to buy the new flooring per square foot.

    As for our townhouse we are selling, we got an offer at 6.5% off asking. We are countering hoping to get a little more out of our place. Enough to cover a few things in the new place in addition to our down payment. So far we are at 22 days on the market with 2 weeks being over the Christmas and New Year's holidays.
     
  16. lefty

    lefty Well-Known Member

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    I've installed floating floors - not difficult at all.

    lefty
     
    1 person likes this.
  17. Ataturk

    Ataturk Well-Known Member

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    You can't nail wood to a concrete slab. In fact you really can't use soild wood; you have to use "engineered" flooring, which is basically plywood strips with a thick hardwood veneer.

    It's not hard to install, at all, but you need to be patient and methodical. You'll need a miter saw, a table saw to rip boards, a jig saw for complicated cuts, chalk lines, trowels, etc. You also need to be sure about moisture from the slab before do it. That means either using a moisture barrier (adds expense --something like $0.50 per square foot) or having the slab tested (hard to find somebody to do it right, and also kind of expensive). I wouldn't do a floating floor.

    To glue it down you just chalk out 18" strips across the whole length of the room, trowel out that much glue, and lay down that many boards at a time. When you get to the end of the line you mark the boards in place and cut them, then install. It's a lot of bending over and getting up and down from your knees if you don't have a helper.

    Shopping for the wood is easy since most of it is made by a couple companies. The best measure of quality is the thickness of the wear layer (that's the top veneer of hardwood in engineered flooring). You want to get a glue that's not water based and you need to figure out whether you need a moisture barrier. Some glues have it built in (but they're costly).
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2014
  18. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Well-Known Member

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    I'm contemplating this for my basement also and my plan is vapor barrier, plywood then engineered flooring.
     
  19. lefty

    lefty Well-Known Member

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    Red is hot. Discounting them all killed the under the counter lights.

    Am now at a loss as to what to do with that red wire.

    lefty
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2014
  20. VLSI

    VLSI Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like installing glue down may be out of my league, especially given that I have no experience, help, or tools. Floating I think I could manage, but not sure if I want to make the step down. It pretty much has to be engineered, no one has real hardwood here, so that's already what I was planning. I did get a quote last year for my two rooms and came in around 4k installed for some middle-of-the-road priced glue down engineered wood, which seemed high and was more than I could cough up at the time. Here's the space: http://imgur.com/a/Egs2w Living room and formal dining (though I'm just going to turn this into home office instead). I'd love to add hardwood to my family room too, but it's even bigger and I just don't think I can afford to do it...
     

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