1. Welcome to the new Styleforum!

    We hope you’re as excited as we are to hang out in the new place. There are more new features that we’ll announce in the near future, but for now we hope you’ll enjoy the new site.

    We are currently fine-tuning the forum for your browsing pleasure, so bear with any lingering dust as we work to make Styleforum even more awesome than it was.

    Oh, and don’t forget to head over to the Styleforum Journal, because we’re giving away two pairs of Carmina shoes to celebrate our move!

    Please address any questions about using the new forum to support@styleforum.net

    Cheers,

    The Styleforum Team

    Dismiss Notice

The Architecture Thread

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Connemara, Jan 31, 2009.

  1. js4design

    js4design Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,961
    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2008
    Location:
    Tidewater, VA
    Ah, yeah I see what you are saying.
     
  2. lawyerdad

    lawyerdad Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    21,808
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2006
    

    I have an amateur's eye and those long shots make perspective tough, but is the idea possibly to have a lap pool and a "play pool" for want of a better term? As a parent, I can actually see some utility theoretical utility in that.
     
  3. sugarbutch

    sugarbutch Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    15,833
    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2010
    Location:
    People's Republic of San Francisco
    If your objective is to swim laps, it's probably not the pool for you. But, for casual use, especially with a number of guests, the walkway functions as a nice bench in the middle of the pool.
     
  4. mbaum

    mbaum Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    994
    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2013
    Location:
    Driving PCH
    I think the pool is a great element in the visuals of the house. It might not be the most practical or entertainment-friendly solution as I seem to discover the kitchen to the right and dining room to the left of the pool. But for me, any water, especially like this, adds a calming element and something really nice to look at from both sides. I like the house. It oozes serenity to me. It plays nicely with clean, delicate lines (That cantilevered element, the reflection of the balcony in the pool, etc.).

    Two things though that my mind immediately noticed:
    • It will be a super pain to keep it pristine (The only way this house will look good)
    • And why building it on the "wrong" side of the hill when you can have an ocean view on the other? Maybe it' the zoning in Luz

    Mike

    Edit; never mind on the view: Re-looking at the pics, I think it does have a killer ocean view ...
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2014
  5. sugarbutch

    sugarbutch Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    15,833
    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2010
    Location:
    People's Republic of San Francisco
    Shirokane House
    Tokyo
    MDS

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  6. sugarbutch

    sugarbutch Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    15,833
    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2010
    Location:
    People's Republic of San Francisco
    The Fall House
    Big Sur
    Fougeron Architecture

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    7 people like this.
  7. Journeyman

    Journeyman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,774
    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2005
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    Absolutely amazing natural setting.

    The glass-box bath and the vertical porthole are interesting features.
     
  8. E TF

    E TF Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    999
    Joined:
    May 29, 2011
    Location:
    Herts, U.K.
    The Shirokane House, Tokyo, looks great on the outside but the inside looks bad to me. Small awkward-looking spaces and dark corners, kind of chopped up and dominated by the well-lit staircase.

    The Fall House is just fantastic.
     
    2 people like this.
  9. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,589
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Location:
    Princeton, NJ
    I like the Tokyo house with exception to the built in sofas and dark stain on the wooden wall panels. It has a sort of luxury boutique feel to it that I would happier without.

    Nitpicks aside, it looks very well designed and built.
     
  10. UnnamedPlayer

    UnnamedPlayer Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    763
    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2012
    Tokyo house is crap.
    Fall house is great
     
  11. sugarbutch

    sugarbutch Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    15,833
    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2010
    Location:
    People's Republic of San Francisco
    

    I think I understand why they chose built-ins. It's not a house designed for the way I live, but that's not really a failing. The dark wood is okay for me.
     
  12. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    14,384
    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2006
    Location:
    The wild and the pure.
    Both have horrible furniture. Almost ruins the big sur place.
     
  13. js4design

    js4design Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,961
    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2008
    Location:
    Tidewater, VA
    Casa Juncal & Rodney
    Pepe Gascon Arquitectura
    Carrer dels Torradors, Begur, Girona, Spain
    2014
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    I don't agree with all the choices, but the language used at the entrance and the separation from the street is really great.
     
  14. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    12,589
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Location:
    Princeton, NJ
    Agreed, I like that house from the street a lot. I feel like I'm being a shit by nitpicking so often, but wtf is up with the stairs in that house? It looks like it wound up too high and they compensated for it by doing that really low angled step. I'd rather they set it back further from the hallway and did a full landing then one step.
     
  15. js4design

    js4design Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,961
    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2008
    Location:
    Tidewater, VA
    The step at the top does the same thing as a way of moving the stairs "out of the way" of circulation. They did a good job making the stairs as transparent as possible, but I still don't think their placement on the transparent edge is the best location.
     
  16. Douglas

    Douglas Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    14,658
    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2007
    Location:
    Purseforum
    new game: every time someone says "language," we drink.
     
    1 person likes this.
  17. Douglas

    Douglas Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    14,658
    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2007
    Location:
    Purseforum
    what is this, the hotbox room?

    seriously, a lot of these houses are nice and all, but practically speaking, i'd think this room would be unuseable during most of the day. Natural light is fantastic, but no overhangs and all glass just makes for torture. If you really used those bookshelves for books, they'd be trashed within months.
     
  18. mbaum

    mbaum Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    994
    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2013
    Location:
    Driving PCH
    Not really in Big Sur. First, it usually is only sunny for a bit (After the fog moves out), often, it stays foggy. Second, temperatures are usually in the low 70s ... when it is warm. Granted, having a sunny/ hotter day might add a bit of temperature but really likely not a concern of anybody there: You open a door, you get the breeze, no AC needed. Up there, everything is about the view, so quite a few houses have extensive glass surfaces and the micro climate makes it possible to enjoy those rooms.

    Agree with the book shelves though to be a weird choice for a sun room.

    But gosh, how spectacular that house in that setting. Need to get my ass up to Big Sur pronto.

    Mike
     
    1 person likes this.
  19. Journeyman

    Journeyman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,774
    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2005
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    I thought that same thing when I was looking at it. It's rather like the conservatory that you see in a lot of larger, older houses in the UK, with the proviso, of course, that the UK's climate is much, much milder than the climate in California. Depending on the season, I agree that the room would probably be unusable for quite a bit of the day, perhaps depending on the season.
     
  20. Douglas

    Douglas Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    14,658
    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2007
    Location:
    Purseforum
    Even in the 70s, a room like that is going to heat up like a greenhouse. I see that you can open the doors but that's only going to help so much in a room like that. Even with a mild temp, however, all that direct sunlight is going to wear on you after a bit. I was dining outside in mid-70s weather just two nights ago, in Baltimore, in the 6:00pm early summer sun, and without an umbrella it got pretty brutal, not to mention that in a reading room, you'd have to wear sunglasses. Indoors. To read.

    I do bet the room is spectacular towards dusk and in the evening. Still, I'd want to have some kind of provision to shade the room somehow.

    In general, IMO, huge windows need roof overhangs. Indirect sunlight = great, Direct sunlight not so much.
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by