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Stain removal guide

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by j, Aug 6, 2004.

  1. mkarim

    mkarim Well-Known Member

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    I've never had a shirt shrink significantly because of washing in hot water.

    Easy with the toothbrushes also, they can ruin a fabric quickly.


    Has this worked for you SG? What about oxy-clean spray instead?
     
  2. Notreknip

    Notreknip Well-Known Member

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    FWIW, the principle method in this thread absolutely blew me away over the course of the weekend. I rescued about 6-7 white shirts that were soon to be garbaged; then after I saw the results, I transitioned to the seemingly risky "colors" with great success.

    The whole process amazed me so much I happily told a few friends about it today when they asked how I spent my weekend.

    ...perhaps the best thing SF has given me thus far.
     
  3. Merlino

    Merlino Well-Known Member

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    The Netherlands
    I haven't posted in a long, long time but I stumbled across this thread and used it on three shirts that I had hanging in the closet. I was planning on throwing them away because of severe pit stains but this method saved my shirts. Really amazing stuff!!
     
  4. M0N0GRAM

    M0N0GRAM Member

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    I wish I would have found this the day I ruined one of my Armani shirts.
    [​IMG]
     
  5. k4lnamja

    k4lnamja Well-Known Member

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    Since this method calls for hot water, then hot water, and then hot water, any issues with shrinkage? Fading? Bleaching/lost color?

    I am primarily concerned with my Jantzens which have a rep for shrinkage (I only wash them in cold water).


    Nuke, were you able to get your stain out w/out shrinkage?

    I would be very surprised to see any real difference in the size or colour of a garment after a single hot water bath, so long as you are diligent about hanging it to dry.

    Ah. I always thought hot water was the reason why shirts shrank but you're saying it's heat from the dryer?

    FWIW, the principle method in this thread absolutely blew me away over the course of the weekend. I rescued about 6-7 white shirts that were soon to be garbaged; then after I saw the results, I transitioned to the seemingly risky "colors" with great success.

    The whole process amazed me so much I happily told a few friends about it today when they asked how I spent my weekend.

    ...perhaps the best thing SF has given me thus far.



    I'm excited to see other people have had success.

    I've a Canali dress shirt with a nasty stain near the 4th button on the front. It wont go away. The material is 70% cotton and 30% seta/silk (se).

    Does anyone know if this recipe would ruin my shirt b/c it's not 100% cotton and a hybrid w/ silk??

    I'll wait for your replies before trying this.

    Cheers
     
  6. imatlas

    imatlas Well-Known Member

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    Nuke, were you able to get your stain out w/out shrinkage?



    Ah. I always thought hot water was the reason why shirts shrank but you're saying it's heat from the dryer?




    I'm excited to see other people have had success.

    I've a Canali dress shirt with a nasty stain near the 4th button on the front. It wont go away. The material is 70% cotton and 30% seta/silk (se).

    Does anyone know if this recipe would ruin my shirt b/c it's not 100% cotton and a hybrid w/ silk??

    I'll wait for your replies before trying this.

    Cheers


    If it's machine washable, you're probably safe.
     
  7. wahnamhong

    wahnamhong Member

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    Curious to try this method for my dress shirts.

    However, last week someone spilled candle wax on the sleeve of my beautiful Acne dry clean only vest. Any ideas on how to remove the stain? Have heard about ironing, or thought maybe call the dry cleaners. Any suggestions would be highly appreciated.
     
  8. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Well-Known Member

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    I'd probably just flake it off once it dried.
     
  9. wahnamhong

    wahnamhong Member

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    I tried that already, flaking it off. But it won't come off, unfortunately. Will bring them to the dry cleaners tomorrow, see what they think.
     
  10. Poindexter

    Poindexter Well-Known Member

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    Candle wax, iron it out. Put a doubled-up paper towel on each side of the shirt, iron. Change position of the towel, repeat . . . until wax is gone.

    Poinz
     
  11. Ed68

    Ed68 New Member

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    VMan,

    I've only registered on this site so that I can pass my thanks to you for the tip.

    I had some old work shirts and a couple of t's that had serious deep rooted deodorant stains.

    I didn't hold out much hope but followed your instructions and cannot believe how well they have come out.

    Thank you so much for posting this!
     
  12. MacDaddy

    MacDaddy Well-Known Member

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    Hyannisport,MA
    I think what the vinegar does is release old soap/detergent residue trapped in the fabric, which causes gray dinginess. Not a bad thing for all your washables, including colors. A vinegary soak is also good for your washing machine itself, for removing the buildup in there.
    The vinegar is 5% acetic acid,and the soap(s) are alkaline,that's why the vinegar dissolves and removes soap residue.You can fill a Downey ball with vinegar instead of fabric softener and it will be softer completely stripped of soap than with a chemical softener.Just be sure to used white distilled vinegar.Sodium percarbonate(aka Oxiclean) used in laundry breaks down into H2O2(hydrogen peroxide),which is a non-chlorinated bleach,and doesn't cause problems like sodium hypochlorite.
     
  13. kimchijajonshim

    kimchijajonshim Active Member

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    Bump for a great thread. Used it just now on 1 white t-shirt, 1 plain white button-down, 1 striped white button-down, 1 pale green button-down. I just used a pretty truncated version of this due to lack of time: 2 hours for the vinegar soak, 2 hours for the strong oxi solution, and overnight with the weaker solution. I'm hang drying them now. The fabric's still wet so I don't know if the stains are completely gone, but they are definitely significantly reduced. The white button down especially look very bright and vibrant. The green shirt doesn't appear to have faded at all. I will be trying this next week on a couple shirts that are MUCH more stained and reporting back.

    FYI, allegedly you can get very similar results to Oxiclean using just sodium percarbonate, which is available at hardware stores in bulk quantities for much cheaper than oxiclean. From what I've heard, oxiclean is 50-60% sodium percarbonate, the rest being surfactants to help break up oils and then probably filler and scents. Not that oxiclean is that expensive, anyway.

    Edit:
    Has anyone tried this with food stains? I had a stain on one of my favorite casual button-downs that I didn't catch before I gave it to hotel laundering. I imagine they threw it in a dryer so it's probably heat set as well. I'd be super bummed if I had to throw it out (or wear it exclusively tucked in) because of the stain.
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2011
  14. applky

    applky Well-Known Member

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    Thought this information would be useful for this thread:

    http://www.butlersguild.com/index.php?subject=152

    Massive stain removal guide, classified by types of stain. Also, glad to now know that there is an International Guild of Professional Butlers. Thank you internet.
     
  15. davesmith

    davesmith Well-Known Member

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  16. applky

    applky Well-Known Member

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    No problem. Will cross post in the thrifting thread.
     
  17. rebel222

    rebel222 Well-Known Member

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    Louisiana
    I tried this on a few of my shirts over the weekend. Some had sweat stains to the point that I quit wearing them. They now look good as new. Thanks. This really does work.

    I do have one issue, however. The procedure has taken a toll on my mother of pearl buttons. They don't have the same luster that they had before. Does anyone know how to "revive" the luster of my MOP buttons? I wouldn't not follow the cleaning process, if i had it to do over again. I'd rather have wearable shirts, with less than shiny MOP buttons, than shiny MOP buttons with ruined shirts.
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2012
  18. steveoly

    steveoly Well-Known Member

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    Omaha, NE
    

    I was literally going to bump this post with the exact same button conundrum to see what other people have done. Yep, the buttons are indeed a bit duller. I was going to scrub them with a toothbrush or a coarse sponge to see if that helps. But I can't tell if the dullness is a residue build up that can be scrubbed off, or if its because they were stripped of the shine and luster permanently. I am obviously hoping for the former.

    One other note if you don't already, wear gloves when working with the concentrated Oxi solution. Man, my hands dried out.

    But as a whole, this process absolutely wipes out stains! :slayer:
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2012
  19. Poindexter

    Poindexter Well-Known Member

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    Acetic acid (vinegar) will indeed 'bite' MOP. This is not a deposit; your buttons have been etched by the vinegar solution. If you put straight vinegar on the button, it would probably fizz, the reaction producing CO2 from the calcium carbonate of the pearl, and eating away at the button.

    I haven't experienced this, being a poor schmuck without MOP buttons. You might try rubbing paraffin (candle wax) or beeswax on them before, and toasting it off after.
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2012
  20. XKxRome0ox

    XKxRome0ox Well-Known Member

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    Los Angeles
    is there a good guide for tie stain removal?
    i stain on a silk tie that i really want to save
    the source of the stain might be some sort of oil or maybe even wine
    (was at a wedding reception when it happened)
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2012

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