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Shoe Care: Polish/Cream in Brogue Holes?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Morgan, Feb 10, 2008.

  1. Morgan

    Morgan Well-Known Member

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    When applying polish or cream to your brogued shoes, how do you prevent the product from filling up the holes punched in the leather? I've used a Q-tip, broken in half, to ream out the larger holes but the smaller ones are basically spackled. Any tips or tricks for either preventing this or aiding cleanup are appreciated.
     
  2. chobochobo

    chobochobo Well-Known Member

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    I've used an old toothbrush [​IMG]
     
  3. dexsteel

    dexsteel Active Member

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  4. Eustace Tilley

    Eustace Tilley Well-Known Member

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  5. Pedantic Turkey

    Pedantic Turkey Well-Known Member

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  6. JLibourel

    JLibourel Well-Known Member

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    I've never worried too much about the small holes. I find the probe on a pipe tool (for pipe smokers) to be ideal for cleaning polish out of broguing large and small.
     
  7. DocHolliday

    DocHolliday Well-Known Member

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    I like using bamboo skewers, the kind you can buy for a buck or two for a hundred. One end is pointed like a toothpick, which is good for the small holes, and the other end is cut flat, which is perfect for the large holes.

    Plus, they're good for skewing.
     
  8. ajs317

    ajs317 Member

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    Even more annoying is when there's stitching, like on a captoe. On my tan ones, the stiching sometimes ends up orange because of the tan polish. I've just taken to avoiding putting polish on the stitching directly.
     
  9. grimslade

    grimslade Well-Known Member

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    I fill every hole with wax and then carefully melt it out after polishing.
     
  10. Nashville

    Nashville Well-Known Member

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    I like using bamboo skewers, the kind you can buy for a buck or two for a hundred. One end is pointed like a toothpick, which is good for the small holes, and the other end is cut flat, which is perfect for the large holes.

    Plus, they're good for skewing.


    Great idea!!
     
  11. bydandie

    bydandie Active Member

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    I have the opposite question, is there anything wrong with not applying polish to the holes? The reason is ask is that the larger holes are exposing a proportion of leather that will never get the same amount of cream and polish that the rest of the leather gets. Obviously, we all wish to keep the holes empty, but it's something I've wondered.
     
  12. LeJouvre

    LeJouvre Well-Known Member

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    If you use a good quality product, this should not really becoem a problem, except if you are using too much product.

    In the event that the punching does become clogged, you should simply brush the excess off before the product dries, or, you could use a toothpick CAREFULLY and remove the excess.

    Whether the leather in the punching should be avoided? No, your entire shoe needs care, especially areas which are stitched and those which are subject to strain, like holes along the punching detail. You don't want those to become weak and begin to crack.
     
  13. Gdot

    Gdot Well-Known Member

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    I run an old toothbrush or stiff artist's brush over any accumlation while the cream is still wet.

    When I'm applying a conditioner I actually use the brush to apply extra conditioner to the seams and holes as I want to be extra sure all of these places are nurished and protected (especially the stitching).
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2012
  14. MyOtherLife

    MyOtherLife Well-Known Member

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    Applying polish or leather conditioner very sparingly to begin with will minimize this concern to the point where a good brushing is all they will need.
    I am in the process of restoring an old pair of captoe brogues and am using an appropriately sized drill bit to very carefully give each hole a crisp edge. I do not recommend this to anyone else but it does work by very gently twisting the bit between your fingers maybe 2 or 3 rotations does the job. Do this one at your own peril. :)
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2012
  15. Gdot

    Gdot Well-Known Member

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    oh - so you mean I'm not supposed to use the drill? just the drill bit?

    :cloud:

    :rotflmao:
     
  16. LeJouvre

    LeJouvre Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  17. Gdot

    Gdot Well-Known Member

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    another pair of $1000 shoes wasted.
     
  18. MyOtherLife

    MyOtherLife Well-Known Member

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    Just the bit. If you are into self mutilation as an attention-getter you can use the drill with your feet in the shoes as you go. This will help to maintain the original shape of the shoes while you work.


    Disclaimer:
    In the event that there is an utter moron reading this out there somewhere that is even remotely considering using an actual drill on their shoes....please don't.
     
  19. add911_11

    add911_11 Well-Known Member

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    If you only apply small amount each time, start the rubbing on the side first to ensure the wax had spread equally and thin. In that way wax should not go into the holes

    That works for me
     
  20. David Copeland

    David Copeland Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]

    Your advice is good.

    But now that the polish has already dried in the punched brogue holes, what can I do to remove the old polish from the holes and replace it with something more natural (like the photo)?

    And what can I do with restoring the darker color of the original stitching?

    All my best,

    David
     

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