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Scotch drinkers

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by jpeirpont, Jul 21, 2004.

  1. jpeirpont

    jpeirpont Well-Known Member

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    I have recently become interested in single malt scotch. I have started with Glenfiddich because it's seems like the easiest to drink. But that leads me to this question. I read an article in which someone suggested enjoying your dram in this manner. "After dinner, pour a dram into a wide glass. Pour a mug of Colombian coffee, with maybe a little cream. Sip the coffee. Now sip the whisky--but do not swallow. "You have to chew it," he says. Turn it around in your mouth 32 times, so that it touches every tooth. Swallow. Now pop a piece of dark chocolate, such as a Godiva (at least 75% cocoa), into your mouth. Smoke a Cuban cigar (a Partagas 4D, say). "If you combine the coffee, the whisky, the chocolate and then the cigar," Paterson declares authoritatively, "you will have an immediate orgasm."* Has anyone ever tried it this way? I love chocolate so it really intrigues me but It sounds sort of elaborate. article from Forbes. Availible at http://www.forbes.com/business/forbe.../0726/182.html
     
  2. kalra2411

    kalra2411 Well-Known Member

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    Whisky, the greatest drink known to man. But please only on the rocks as the very most in terms of adding things.

    The latest trend in London whisky drinking is to add a cap full of Perrier water to scotch, either on or off the rocks, and that is also good, as it brings out the true notes of the whiskey.

    But at the low price level I would go for Johnnie Walker Black Label instead of Glenfiddich. I know Black Label is not a malt and Glenfiddich is, but you can really see how much of a better Whiskey Black Label is.

    Malts are only better at the top end, such as Macallan 1948.

    As a good mid range whiskey Johnnie Walker Green Label, Blue Label, Carhdu, and Dimple are the best.
     
  3. kalra2411

    kalra2411 Well-Known Member

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    Also I am reminded of a bar I used to go to in the 70/80's, Regentsis (now Kensington Rooftop Gardens) I often had a rusty nail, which is scotch and Drambuie.
     
  4. kalra2411

    kalra2411 Well-Known Member

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    When you say Dram do you mean Drambuie?
     
  5. alaaro

    alaaro Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like a messy experiment. It seems the point is that induging with the best of the best all at once may be good. I dont know though. Too complicated for me.

    Scotch is a great drink. I like Dalwhinnie (sp?) a lot. Usually the better scotches tend to be much smoother, but if its still rough, I often just cut it with some water. I like that Perrier idea. I'll try that next time I am on a scotch kick.
     
  6. jjrobi

    jjrobi Member

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    Dram is a measurement of liquid. Today it it is a measurement of scotch determined by the pourer ("Have a wee dram" is an invitation to take some Scotch).

    Found this:

    Dram: A weight, orig. the ancient Greek drachma; hence, in Apothecaries' weight, a weight of 60 grains = 1/8 of an ounce; in Avoirdupois weight, of 27.13 grains = 1/16 of an ounce; = drachm

    So far as drinking, I enjoy it straight or with a little water.
     
  7. VMan

    VMan Well-Known Member

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    Very interesting. Actually I'm a novice, but have been drinking whiskys (or whiskeys) more often, and appreciate the flavor. I used to mix them in the fashion of say, a Jack and Coke, but now prefer them (at least the better ones) on the rocks.

    Let me ask a few questions:

    Scotch and Bourbon are both types of whiskeys?

    Scotch is Scottish, and Bourbon is US...usually a Kentucky or Tennessee whiskey?

    Whiskey is the spelling used for a Bourbon, Whisky is the spelling used for a Scotch?
     
  8. kalra2411

    kalra2411 Well-Known Member

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    1. Yes

    2. Yes again, Kentucky is the original home of Bourbon (I am quite sure), but these days most American Whiskys are Bourbon.

    3. I think one is US English spelling, and the other is UK English spelling.
     
  9. kalra2411

    kalra2411 Well-Known Member

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    Ah, so going of on the Drambuie tangent was irrelevant.
     
  10. jjrobi

    jjrobi Member

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    Scotch and bourbon are both whiskeys.

    Here are the general differences. The following statements are generalizations.

    Bourbon takes its name from Bourbon County, Kentucky. Small batch bourbons are single distillery brews, meaning they have not been blended with other whiskeys/bourbons/neutral spirits, and thus are akin single malt scotches.

    Scotch is usually 80 proof, bourbon is usually 100 proof.

    Bourbon is made from distilled corn, Scotch is made from various distilled grains.
     
  11. jjrobi

    jjrobi Member

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    All this talk of bourbon and scotch has made me thirsty and I still have 3 hours left at work ><
     
  12. kalra2411

    kalra2411 Well-Known Member

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    Also Bourbon does not use peat does it?
     
  13. kalra2411

    kalra2411 Well-Known Member

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  14. jjrobi

    jjrobi Member

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    Yes, no peat in Bourbon. Rusty Nail is a great drink, good choce Kalra. I enjoy Old Fashioned vey much as well. A good night out would be an Old Fashioned followed by a Rusty Nail, a nice beer and cap it off with a Brandy Sidecar. I guess my night is all planned out.
     
  15. kalra2411

    kalra2411 Well-Known Member

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    Haha, a great drinker, that's what I like to hear. Too bad I have not had a decent Rusty Nail since Regentsis closed down.
     
  16. Huntsman

    Huntsman Well-Known Member

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    Well, jpierpont, I understand that chocolate and scotch is an excellent combination, but that concoction is to overblown for good scotch -- scotch is a drink of elegance and subtlety. Of course, you may enjoy that combination, but use cheap scotch, Johnnie Walker Red or Dewar's or something like that.
    Otherwise, it would be like having a mimosa with Dom Perignon.

    The two primary divisions in scotch are the blended scotches (Johnnie Walker, Ballantine, Ambasssador, Cutty Sark) and Single Malts, which are a product of a single distillery. Now, Blended scotches have a high proportion of grain whiskey blended with the malt whiskey, which dilutes the character. Of the Blended whiskeys, I second Kalra's reccomendation of JW Black Label, and I'll explain the reasons why in a moment.

    As for single malts, they are the best because they are not diluted and they show the unique character of the ingrediants (especially the water), the house style, and the land in their flavours. The 80-odd Single malt distilleries are generally divided into certain regions, and of them, Highland, Speyside, Lowland, and ISlay are the most common.

    I drink scotches from all the regions, depending on mood -- their is a whiskey for nearly all moods -- but Highland and Speyside whiskeys are my usual drink. They are elegant and gentle. Available favs for me are Macallan (quite common in a decent bar), Cragganmore, and the aforementioned Dalwhinnie. The Islay scotches are the most distinctive of all, having their malt roasted over peat-fed fires, and believe me, the smoke really comes through. Bowmore is a good first if you want to try and Islay, and Laphroig (sp) is a seriously smoky scotch. I also like Talisker, which is a compromise between a Speyside and an Islay -- a little smokey, but has the nice caramelly notes of a Speyside.

    As for Glenfiddich, yes it is an approachable scotch. But I do find that of all the scotches, Glenfiddich has the most herbal notes -- by herbal I mean it has a nose and flavour of grassy, green things, and is unique in that manner. I personally prefer the richer caramel notes of other scotches.

    Back to JW Black -- that particular blend has a quite low proportion of diluting grain whiskey, and most of the malt whiskey in it is from Highland and Speyside, so it is my standard indulgence.

    Best way (generally agreed) to drink scotch is at ambient temp, or slightly chilled, with water added up to 20% the volume of the scotch. Some like soda, or scotch on the rocks. I do rocks sometimes, but most often just drop one in my scotch -- it cools it a little and dilutes it just right for me.

    Oh, and if you need a dessert-y scotch drink, do, do, do have a rusty nail as Kalra mentioned. it's 1:1 or 1:1.5 ration of scotch to Drambuie, Drambuie being a sweet scotch liquor. Oh, and Kalra, a 'dram' is a unit of measure...

    I've also heard that scotch, neat, with warm chocolate chip cookies has the above-mentioned effect. I don't need that assistance, so I haven't tried it. I might be impelled to try a square of Lindt bittersweet chocolate with scotch, but usually pair it with an assertive Cabernet or Port.

    Regards,
    Huntsman (can you tell that I like my scotch? ;-) )
     
  17. kalra2411

    kalra2411 Well-Known Member

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    It has got to be every professional whiskey drinkers every day drink.

    By the way, Johnnie Walker also do Green Label, which is a single malt. It is a damm good whiskey too.
     
  18. Huntsman

    Huntsman Well-Known Member

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    Agreed on the JWB.

    Have never had JW Green, Blue or Gold Labels, though -- I'm quite rural so I have to go out of my way to get scotch. They're on my list to try, though. Interestingly, though rural, I'm fortunate to have a local bar with 18 malts.

    They know me well.

    Regards,
    Huntsman
     
  19. kalra2411

    kalra2411 Well-Known Member

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    By the way, my other favorite drinks are Champagne and Brandy (mostly only cognacs). I have found it to be the case that most Whiskey drinkers also enjoy these drinks aswell, is it true on this board?
     
  20. kalra2411

    kalra2411 Well-Known Member

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    Gold is also very good, especially if you like black, a similar whiskey, but much much smoother (but also very different in some respects)

    Blue, you are missing out. One of the best blends. A little rough compared to the more modern blends, but still amazing, quite potent as well, when compared to Black.
     

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