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Resume Formats

Discussion in 'Business, Careers & Education' started by deadly7, Jan 9, 2011.

  1. imageWIS

    imageWIS Well-Known Member

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    The only advice I can give, is keep it simple, but tell a story with your bullets.

    1. Manager of Service
    a. managed team of 500 people
    1a. named manager of the year 4 years in a row
    b. Worked with a budget of 100 billion dollars
    1b. Consistently rated high marks by the budget review committee.


    Something along those lines. Dont just list your job description, list your accomplishments.


    Can it be a combo of both?
     
  2. deadly7

    deadly7 Well-Known Member

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    Can it be a combo of both?

    I have a combo of both. Stupid HR people want to see <XYZ> written in your resume, so I added that for them. Managers want to see what you actually did and any successes, so I added my more interesting [or favorite] projects.

    How long are your guys' resumes? There is 0% chance I can fit mine to one page and still have it be informative. It gets to be 2 pages when I include job information and accomplishments.
     
  3. BC2012

    BC2012 Well-Known Member

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    Dec 31, 2010
    Location:
    Boston, MA
    I have a combo of both. Stupid HR people want to see <XYZ> written in your resume, so I added that for them. Managers want to see what you actually did and any successes, so I added my more interesting [or favorite] projects.

    How long are your guys' resumes? There is 0% chance I can fit mine to one page and still have it be informative. It gets to be 2 pages when I include job information and accomplishments.


    Are you a professor with numerous faculty pubs or a CEO of a major company? If not, then 2 pages is not possible. Be more succinct with your experience. There's a 100% chance you can fit it on 1 page. Everyone else does.
     
  4. joneog

    joneog Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    New York
    Some of these have already been mentioned but here's my .02 :

    1) No objective or fluff... Avoid cliches and buzzwords, its obvious.
    2)Keep it simple and streamlined (no need for it to be 1 page but don't make it an auto-biogrpahy)
    3)Only add extra-curicular/hobbies/volunteer activities if it's relevant to the position; no one cares that you have an awesome stamp collection. Exclude references until asked to provide them.
    4)For work experience, don't describe what you did in more than 1 or 2 lines, explain how you improved the process, brought in more revenue, increased effeciency etc. You want to show that you are going to create value for the firm and you have unique, applicable skills. Short bullet points seem to work well.
    5)I think you should include High School in your education section if you did well. It's a good place to throw in you SAT/ACT scores and class rank if they're impressive since they are an easy way for the reader to compare you against others.
    6)Font isn't a big deal, make sure its readable and basic. Use bullets, indentations, bold header text or underlines to structure the resume and make it easier to read. Obviously spell check and re-read multiple times for grammar, have others do the same.
    7) If you're not emailing/faxing it find some sturdy, possibly an off-white yet understated paper to use. You want to stand out but not it a bad way.
     
  5. BC2012

    BC2012 Well-Known Member

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    Some of these have already been mentioned but here's my .02 :

    1) No objective or fluff... Avoid cliches and buzzwords, its obvious.


    I disagree about "no buzzwords." Buzzwords are what HR people are taught to look for. By not including them you are doing yourself a disservice.

    Never, ever go over one page. It's resume building 101.

    Only if you are a college undergrad in your sophomore year applying for internships. If you banged out a 1400+ on the SATs (2100 now, I guess) it's worthwhile to list, but otherwise no one will care about your presidency of the Yearbook or 10th grade stint on the Cross Country team.
     
  6. joneog

    joneog Well-Known Member

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    I suppose that depends on where you're applying. Not all resumes go onto a giant pile to be sifted through by HR.

    I thought the same thing until I talked to a friend who does a lot of recruiting in finance/banking. It's just not possible for someone who has held multiple positions to fit everything into 1-page.

    Like I said, only list if it's impressive. I'ts part of one's education so I think its useful. If I see that someone got a 1450 on their SAT and graduated 2nd in their HS class that shows me they either have a great work effort or are naturally bright.
     
  7. deadly7

    deadly7 Well-Known Member

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    I thought the same thing until I talked to a friend who does a lot of recruiting in finance/banking. It's just not possible for someone who has held multiple positions to fit everything into 1-page.

    +1 to this. I'm onto my 4th job now, with my list of responsibilities/achievements increasing at each job. At some point there's just too much useful info to keep everything confined to one page.
     
  8. otc

    otc Well-Known Member

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    Some of these have already been mentioned but here's my .02 :

    1) No objective or fluff... Avoid cliches and buzzwords, its obvious.

    3)Only add extra-curicular/hobbies/volunteer activities if it's relevant to the position; no one cares that you have an awesome stamp collection. Exclude references until asked to provide them.


    Depends what you mean by buzzwords...obviously you don't want to be the guy who writes "cross-synthesized post-hoc synergies" but you want to include the key words/acronyms that they expect to see (I think this is what BC2012 was talking about). You might want to still put the word "Excel" on your resume somewhere in case some HR drone doesn't realize that your previous experience clearly required someone who knew how to use all of the office apps.

    As for extra-curricular stuff and hobbies...I would think it is worth a line. It gives the candidates a little personality and is often used by interviewers to sort of break the ice or get a feel how you talk about something you are interested in (instead of how you respond to interview questions). I was asked very frequently about things listed there...
     
  9. BC2012

    BC2012 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
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    Dec 31, 2010
    Location:
    Boston, MA
    +1 to this. I'm onto my 4th job now, with my list of responsibilities/achievements increasing at each job. At some point there's just too much useful info to keep everything confined to one page.

    Having worked in finance (and looking for finance internships now) I've heard from recruiters at major firms as well as my own career services department that 1 page is assumed. If you have that many jobs and truly feel each job has relevant experience (and can't trim it) then I guess you have no choice but to go over one page. Just make sure that each job is worth going over the one page...the reason for one page is that recruiters get a ton of resumes and it is easier for them to have a simple, one pager than reading through two pages.

    But, if you are exemplary, two pages might be necessary.
     
  10. joneog

    joneog Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    Depends what you mean by buzzwords...obviously you don't want to be the guy who writes "cross-synthesized post-hoc synergies" but you want to include the key words/acronyms that they expect to see (I think this is what BC2012 was talking about). You might want to still put the word "Excel" on your resume somewhere in case some HR drone doesn't realize that your previous experience clearly required someone who knew how to use all of the office apps.

    As for extra-curricular stuff and hobbies...I would think it is worth a line. It gives the candidates a little personality and is often used by interviewers to sort of break the ice or get a feel how you talk about something you are interested in (instead of how you respond to interview questions). I was asked very frequently about things listed there...


    By buzzwords (phrases) i mean stuff like "core competencies" and "interpsersonal skills".
    You should use specific terms to describe skills, like your excel example. My point is simply that if I'm reading a lot of resumes trite phrases that do nothing but fill the pages with words, while making you sound phony and too rehearsed, will probably get an eye roll. Again it comes down to where you're interviewing. Maybe some situations it helps.

    As for the hobbies etc. I think it can be worked in during the interview process but if it's relevant and makes you a bit unique then I'm sure it wouldn't hurt. I tend to avoid it so as to get as much relevant work experience in while still keeping the resume short and tight.
     
  11. deadly7

    deadly7 Well-Known Member

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    Having worked in finance (and looking for finance internships now) I've heard from recruiters at major firms as well as my own career services department that 1 page is assumed. If you have that many jobs and truly feel each job has relevant experience (and can't trim it) then I guess you have no choice but to go over one page. Just make sure that each job is worth going over the one page...the reason for one page is that recruiters get a ton of resumes and it is easier for them to have a simple, one pager than reading through two pages.

    But, if you are exemplary, two pages might be necessary.

    I seldom deal with recruiters as of now, so I have a different need. It makes sense from your context that you would put yours down to one page (where possible), though.

    By buzzwords (phrases) i mean stuff like "core competencies" and "interpsersonal skills".
    You should use specific terms to describe skills, like your excel example. My point is simply that if I'm reading a lot of resumes trite phrases that do nothing but fill the pages with words, while making you sound phony and too rehearsed, will probably get an eye roll. Again it comes down to where you're interviewing. Maybe some situations it helps.

    As for the hobbies etc. I think it can be worked in during the interview process but if it's relevant and makes you a bit unique then I'm sure it wouldn't hurt. I tend to avoid it so as to get as much relevant work experience in while still keeping the resume short and tight.

    Sooo I shouldn't have a qualification "i'm cool"? [​IMG]

    I usually list them, at least the position name. Every interview I've had has asked me questions on one or two of my volunteering experiences, and I can't say my volunteering [or leadership] experience is unique at all.
     
  12. kasper007

    kasper007 Well-Known Member

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    Jul 16, 2008
    I thought the same thing until I talked to a friend who does a lot of recruiting in finance/banking. It's just not possible for someone who has held multiple positions to fit everything into 1-page.

    i used to work in IB and was very involved with recruiting. I remember someone asking a question about resume length at a b-school presentation and our CEO (who by luck was present) almost cut the student off and answered:

    "my resume fits on one page, so can yours".

    experienced folks generally have some sort of presentation / memo where they elaborate on specifics deal experience, etc. But, this is never shared early in the recruiting process / at the same time as resume. The same goes for PE.
     
  13. imageWIS

    imageWIS Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    I suppose that depends on where you're applying. Not all resumes go onto a giant pile to be sifted through by HR.


    Correct. Oftentimes, resumes are sifted by computer algorithms first designed to look for buzzwords and then the 'good' results (oftentimes many 'good' resumes are rejected by the computer) are forwarded to HR people who will again look for buzzwords. [​IMG]
     
  14. Stu

    Stu Well-Known Member

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    Princeton
    I can see why. I sometimes have it, sometimes I don't, depends on the job, really.

    I personally would not give a rat's ass about an objective if I were a hiring manger. Who cares if you "seek to find a challenging position to fulfill my aspirations to whatever." I recommend using that valuable real estate for a summary value statement, i.e.:

    Value statement
    Work Experience
    Education
    Certiufications, licenses, honors, awards, etc.
     
  15. deadly7

    deadly7 Well-Known Member

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    i used to work in IB and was very involved with recruiting. I remember someone asking a question about resume length at a b-school presentation and our CEO (who by luck was present) almost cut the student off and answered:

    "my resume fits on one page, so can yours".

    experienced folks generally have some sort of presentation / memo where they elaborate on specifics deal experience, etc. But, this is never shared early in the recruiting process / at the same time as resume. The same goes for PE.

    Yes, and he can do this because he already has a large name -- he's a CEO at an educational institution. If he's going to get an interview he won't need more information than that on his resume. Everybody isn't so fortunate. This post is realms of stupid.

    Correct. Oftentimes, resumes are sifted by computer algorithms first designed to look for buzzwords and then the 'good' results (oftentimes many 'good' resumes are rejected by the computer) are forwarded to HR people who will again look for buzzwords. [​IMG]
    Yep.
     
  16. kasper007

    kasper007 Well-Known Member

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    Yes, and he can do this because he already has a large name -- he's a CEO at an educational institution. If he's going to get an interview he won't need more information than that on his resume. Everybody isn't so fortunate. This post is realms of stupid.

    Where did i talk about the CEO of an educational institution.........

    From first-hand experience with a BB IB, i can tell you that one page resume are the norm for recruiting at all level, including at the MD / executive level. anyway, in finance, resume are very rarely handed directly as there's usually an intermediary (campus career service or HH) and they have the sense of not sending resumes over 1 page. And you're a little naive if you think a resume is all that is going to be asked from a prospective executive hire.......
     
  17. ashpool

    ashpool Well-Known Member

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    I think volunteering / extra-curricular are important even if you have other job experience. Good conversation pieces.
     
  18. pseudonym

    pseudonym Well-Known Member

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    I've talked to almost all of my professors about my resume and received a ton of tips/suggestions.

    After spending some time revising it over the break, I think I have my overall resume. Anybody care to take a look? I'm a sophomore trying to find a summer internship (major is Finance/Accounting).

    Thanks.
     
  19. Jr Mouse

    Jr Mouse Well-Known Member

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    I have been in the process of re-writing my own resume. Currently I think it's &quot;good,&quot; but could be stronger. I'm not an expert and have a few questions myself, but I will give a little advice what I have learned over the years first.

    1. Yes, keep it to one page! Unless you have 15+ years of experience under your belt and have had multiple jobs, you are not writing an effective resume if you can't keep it to a single page. I think someone here said they are having trouble with space now that they are on their 4th job. That's nothing, to be blunt. Streamline and rewrite things as needed. Cut out the fat. Only senior level people in their careers should have a resume over a single page.

    2. Don't use a MS Word Template. Everyone uses those and your resume will have less of a chance of standing out.

    3. I send my resume as a PDF file whenever possible. Why? It guarantees my formatting will look correct when it is opened. I have seen too many errors with the .doc format over the years and you can believe that the person who opens your resume will assume the messed up formatting is your fault and shows a lack of attention to detail.

    4. Don't include your college GPA unless it was really good. If it was not, try to avoid even bringing it up.

    5. Try and keep your resume focused on experience relevant to your career or the job you are applying for. If you had to take a job waiting tables or working at Best Buy to pay your bills while job hunting, DON'T include it on your resume.

    6. Have two to three people proof read it for spelling and grammer. Just make sure you tell them that it is the only help you need. There is nothing more frustrating then finishing a resume re-write and having people nitpick your format. If you are happy and confident with it, then move forward.

    Now, I do have a question myself and would like some advice from the crowd. For the last last year and a half I have been working at a job outside of my career field. I'm a marketing/ad guy and am currently working at a financial office. It's something I kind of fell into when I got laid off from an old job and the economy was tanking. My concern is how to frame this on my resume so it does not show a lack of focus. I have also been doing some freelance work in my career field, but it's something I do part time when the work comes in.
     
  20. justinsmnz

    justinsmnz Well-Known Member

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    I'm a third-year Advertising major and I'm currently sending out resumes for what will be my second summer internship at a large agency. I've cut my resume down to just three sections: Education, relevant experience, and relevant activities. By using these titles it's obvious that I have other experience and other activities, but only chose to share what applies for the specific position.

    Advertising is a far more creative field than finance/banking and even we are told to absolutely never go over a page (by career counselors at uni and HR reps at many agencies I've spoken with.) If you have additional info that you want to include but do not have room for, then either mention it in your cover letter or cut out some information from other positions to make room.

    As far as formatting goes, my resume is one sheet with .375&quot; margins and the font size is approx. 11pt Adobe Garamond Pro with some bold headings. I print on a 100# matte white cardstock for both my cover letters and resume. It's heavy enough to stand out when shuffling through a stack, but not an obnoxious color or texture like most other stocks.
     

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