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Remember the Eighties

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by Augustus Medici, Jun 26, 2007.

  1. JBZ

    JBZ Well-Known Member

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    The '80s also gave us The Police, U2, and R.E.M. (though U2 and The Police were actually formed in the late '70s). Every decade has it's good and bad music, as has been pointed out above.

    As for what the culture was like, if Bright Lights, Big City is to be believed, everyone in New York was spending ludicrous amounts of money on cocaine and staying up to all hours in the middle of the week.
     
  2. GQgeek

    GQgeek Well-Known Member

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    dude, you call yourself GQgeek and we are supposed to believe that you have no embarrassing pictures? Good luck.

    Heh. I'm a geek on the inside but not on the outside. And if I could take GQ out of my name I would. I stopped reading that crappy magazine at the same time the forum was created. When I was a teen I wore slightly baggy jeans and skater t-shirts, but nothing too embarassing. I was in uniform most of the time anyway.
     
  3. life_interrupts

    life_interrupts Well-Known Member

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    The 80s were a good time, but out of it came a cynicism that we as a society have a difficult time reconciling with our apple-pie and blue-skies view of the world. We "defeated" communism, returned the hostages home, and went about our prosperous lives. Yet, we were no longer at ease. We were responsible for bad shit happening around the world (Central America, World Bank loans crippling economies) and couldn't control the bad shit happening here (crack, crime, teen pregnancy rates, the spread of HIV). The gulf between those with and those without grew. More people were getting high just to function and while none questioned Grandpa Ronnie Reagan, no one quite believed he was in charge. Besides, it wasn't the government's problem if your schools sucked and the water was filled with contaminants? Lots of good music: Public Enemy, U2, the Police, Grand Master Flash and the Furious Five, Prince, Michael Jackson (before he lost his mind and his soul), Fishbone, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Living Colour, (giving the devil his due) Guns and Roses, the Clash (and all of the spin-off bands, like Big Audio Dynamite, the Pogues, etc.), Talking Heads, [​IMG]. Lots of embarrassing photos, too, like the hi-top fade, white, pink, and baby blue "letterman's" sweater, and Travel Fox shoes. Yeah!
     
  4. montecristo#4

    montecristo#4 Well-Known Member

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    The '70s was by far the greatest decade in terms of music, crazy styles, and overall general debauchery. There was major sixties carryover in the early part of the decade, leading to the greatest rock bands ever (e.g. Zeppelin). Fashion ranged from hippie shit (early seventies) to crazy disco Studio 54 synthetic fabric leisure suit looks. The seventies blew the eighties away in terms of category changing film. The AIDS thing hadn't hit yet so everyone was swinging.

    The eighties by contrast are generally recognized as a much more conservative decade. Reagan was in office. Evangelical Chrisitanity was taking off. Alex P Keaton and Wall Street were hot . Yes, there was cocaine culture, but by and large the '80s were a conservative reaction to the '70s, the craziest decade since the '20s.
     
  5. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Well-Known Member

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    The '70s was by far the greatest decade in terms of music, crazy styles, and overall general debauchery. There was major sixties carryover in the early part of the decade, leading to the greatest rock bands ever (e.g. Zeppelin). Fashion ranged from hippie shit (early seventies) to crazy disco Studio 54 synthetic fabric leisure suit looks. The seventies blew the eighties away in terms of category changing film. The AIDS thing hadn't hit yet so everyone was swinging.

    The eighties by contrast are generally recognized as a much more conservative decade. Reagan was in office. Evangelical Chrisitanity was taking off. Alex P Keaton and Wall Street were hot . Yes, there was cocaine culture, but by and large the '80s were a conservative reaction to the '70s, the craziest decade since the '20s.

    I agree, the 70s were definitely the crunkest decade.
     
  6. Faded501s

    Faded501s Well-Known Member

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    The '70s was by far the greatest decade in terms of music, crazy styles, and overall general debauchery. There was major sixties carryover in the early part of the decade, leading to the greatest rock bands ever (e.g. Zeppelin). Fashion ranged from hippie shit (early seventies) to crazy disco Studio 54 synthetic fabric leisure suit looks. The seventies blew the eighties away in terms of category changing film. The AIDS thing hadn't hit yet so everyone was swinging.

    The eighties by contrast are generally recognized as a much more conservative decade. Reagan was in office. Evangelical Chrisitanity was taking off. Alex P Keaton and Wall Street were hot . Yes, there was cocaine culture, but by and large the '80s were a conservative reaction to the '70s, the craziest decade since the '20s.
    I agree, the 70s were definitely the crunkest decade.


    +1 but the 80's were the last of the "good old days" when 18 yr olds could legally drink in Wisconsin; having a beer while driving down the road in Florida was acceptable (and I think legal); you could solicit a joint off a complete stranger on the streets of Chicago and the old "I've got a van in the parking lot" line would get you laid.

    And then came Reagan and paraquot and MADD and AIDS and I don't even want to think about it.
     
  7. EL72

    EL72 Well-Known Member

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    The '70s was by far the greatest decade in terms of music, crazy styles, and overall general debauchery. There was major sixties carryover in the early part of the decade, leading to the greatest rock bands ever (e.g. Zeppelin). Fashion ranged from hippie shit (early seventies) to crazy disco Studio 54 synthetic fabric leisure suit looks. The seventies blew the eighties away in terms of category changing film. The AIDS thing hadn't hit yet so everyone was swinging.

    The eighties by contrast are generally recognized as a much more conservative decade. Reagan was in office. Evangelical Chrisitanity was taking off. Alex P Keaton and Wall Street were hot . Yes, there was cocaine culture, but by and large the '80s were a conservative reaction to the '70s, the craziest decade since the '20s.


    This is true. I have no idea what crunk means but the 70s were a much more innovative decade from a cultural and social perspective than the 80s. I guess this is true of most any time period but the 80s were a crappy time to be a teenager from a sexual standpoint given the free sex mentality had evaporated by the early 80s [​IMG]
     
  8. Reggs

    Reggs Well-Known Member

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    I was wondering what Japanese pop culture was like in the 80s, because some of it currently is a bit reminiscent of American 80s pop culture.

    I think the worst part of the 80's was women's hair.

    Edit: I have this in my netflix que. Any good?
    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0380268/
     
  9. Thomas

    Thomas Well-Known Member

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    The 80's were plasticky for me. Duran Duran and their ilk ruled the early part of the decade, then it was the hair bands. If you ventured underground to the indie labels you had Minor Threat, Black Flag, Husker Du, which was a ragged release from the manicured fronts everyone was putting forth. It was corporate and upright and starched and religious. Everything seemed so groomed, even in high school where even the freshmen boys rolled the sleeves on their t-shirts and put too much effort into their hair.

    Then again, we had a former actor as president for eight of those years, so facades should have been expected to take the forefront.
     
  10. SGladwell

    SGladwell Well-Known Member

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    And then came Reagan and paraquot and MADD and AIDS and I don't even want to think about it.

    What's paraquot?
     
  11. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Well-Known Member

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    What's paraquot?
    I think that it was the chemical that was sprayed on the pot plants that made people get sick and hallicunate.
     
  12. designprofessor

    designprofessor Well-Known Member

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    a cocaine fueled, massive shoulder padded, tidal wave haired, oingo -boingo dancin', Laurie Anderson art performanced, horrible sit commed decade. I seem to recall less girth on the average American...
     
  13. LabelKing

    LabelKing Well-Known Member

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    That's why I chose 1969 as my break-off date. Then I could be a swinging '60s person and naturally go on into the '70s with my hepness intact and live fast and die young.
     
  14. Thomas

    Thomas Well-Known Member

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    That's why I chose 1969 as my break-off date. Then I could be a swinging '60s person and naturally go on into the '70s with my hepness intact and live fast and die young.

    I suspect that today it's much easier to live fast and die young than it was in days past. Of course today we seem to enjoy it less.
     
  15. LabelKing

    LabelKing Well-Known Member

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    I suspect that today it's much easier to live fast and die young than it was in days past. Of course today we seem to enjoy it less.
    Nothing really fabulous exists today as it did in those days. People seem afraid of displaying some sort of style while dying in excessive alcoholic consumption--it's either some decrepit Meth whore or a bunch of teens who are more than likely going to end up at a morgue. And then you have the really pathetic office folk.
     
  16. LSeca

    LSeca Well-Known Member

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    I graduated hs in '91. I remember what I was "in-to" in the eighties...Duran Duran, rediculous hair, acid washed 501s, and t-shirts with some brand name like ocean pacific plastered all over them. I do not miss it.
     
  17. Get Smart

    Get Smart Well-Known Member

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    I was in high school during the 80s....looking back it seemed like a great time. The music scenes were awesome, having discovered Kiss around 10, The Who at 11, Duran Duran and Missing Persons at 12, The Pistols and Clash around that time too. Listening to The Specials, Selecter and Madness at my friend's house before taking the bus to our Jr High school in 1983. Discovering punk and hardcore around 1984 and the life changing lyrics of Minor Threat.

    Worldwise, I remember being afraid of dying in a nuclear war..esp after the mindfuck tv movie "The Day After"

    Chicks...eh, didnt get many since "punkers" back then werent cool like they are today.

    My anthem growing up in the 80s..."Creatures" by The Adolescents

    I'm not accepted by my peers - SO WHAT
    I could care less about those queers - THEY'RE FUCKED
    Chicks are hot and full of cheers - PLEASERS
    They say NO so I jerk white tears - TEASERS

    I Hate them all - Creatures
    I Hate all them- Creatures

    etc
     
  18. Thomas

    Thomas Well-Known Member

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    And then you have the really pathetic office folk.

    I resemble that remark.
     
  19. Faded501s

    Faded501s Well-Known Member

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    What's paraquot?
    I think that it was the chemical that was sprayed on the pot plants that made people get sick and hallicunate.


    Yes, but if it caused hallucinations I suppose it wouldn't have been ALL bad [​IMG]

    And soon thereafter we saw the exodus of $40 fill-the-sandwich-bag ounces of brown weed and the entrance of $40 not-quite-7 grams quarters of sinsemilla which ultimately lead to hydroponic offerings of today. As a friend of mine put it so eloquently "You remember those days? We smoked like we wanted to die from it."

    Actually, when I think back on the 80's it was a relatively stable period that confused a whole generation. I think we were the first generation that grew up knowing that we had no idea what the future was going to be like. Maybe that's just part of being a teenager but it seemed that none of the old rules applied anymore.

    Byproducts of the 50's, our parents were the Cleaver generation and all of their "everyone should serve their country/be part of the community/love thy neighbor" ethics were dated as was the notion of "retiring with a pension and getting the gold watch". We didn't know how it was going to turn out but we knew that there was no job stability and that Social Security was not going to do anything for us. A college degree no longer meant a great job but was rather a vehicle to get off the street and into an office (usually tainted with mediocrity) and a boring have-no-impact "yes" man job.

    Not to mention the "no pre-marital sex/until death do you part" view of relationships which seemed naive if not hypocritical. As a young man raised by a stay-at-home mom it was hard to figure out my "role" with women, who were now my "equal". I can't even tell you how many women I insulted with chivalrous acts like opening a door for them.

    And just to exacerbate the confusion, technology really started to transform daily life for our generation. In 1980 middle-class America did not have microwave ovens, VCRs, cable TV, cordless telephones (or cell phones, computers or the internet). We had radio, cassettes, 5 television channels (in the big cities), Pong, and grew up with little green army men, GI Joes, Big Wheels and the game of baseball. By 1990 all of the previously mentioned "necessities" were commonplace in the average home and computers were invading the business arena.

    My first job out of HS was as a bookkeeper tracking stock/sales of a mens' clothing store (Chess King...yay!) on a desk-sized sheet of "grid paper". My fingers had callouses from banging the adding machine. Within two years we were migrating from a cash-register based system to a computerized Point-Of-Sale. Born in 1966 my only exposure to computers was a 1 credit hour (mandatory) class in college. Systems were DOS-based (text, no icons) and you had either the green or orange letters on monitors. If it wasn't IBM, it was shit. Within 5 years most 6th graders were more capable of running modern business system than people my age.

    It really was a kind of clash of cultures for some of us. People my age were probably at the very beginning of GenX and had some very hippyish 70's sensibilities...hanging out (anywhere) drinking and smoking and generally giving half a crap about the next guy. Sex, drugs, rock and roll! Or you were a white-bread "square" on the straight-and-narrow path...but we all seemed to get along. And then came punk rock and all of the angst of the generation just two or three years younger than us. I wore long hair, Levis and concert T's. My little bro wore a dyed mohawk, parachute pants and Hitler Ts. We'd chill, get oblierated and have "love-ins"...in a very communal type setting. They would do poppers and go to the "kiddie club" to mosh/slam and f each other up. The Breakfast Club is a great representation of the era.

    And music was all over the place too (welcome to the MTV generation). We listened to a lot of the classic stuff like Zeppelin, the Stones, Floyd, the Who, the Doors, Hendrix, Cream, CCR, etc. And you want to talk about rocking out Frampton Comes Alive? On the heavier side there was Ozzie and Sabbath, AC/DC, Van Halen, the Scorps and a lot of fun bands like Motley Crue, Ratt, Cinderella, Guns. Rush was huge as was *blush* REO Speedwagon. Journey and Boston were big and two bands I really liked and Aerosmith (with Run DMC...fuck yeah!). Looking past the glam metal stuff there were a lot of innovative bands like U2, INXS, the Clash, Sex Pistols, Depeche Mode and many others. Just a very eclectic decade.

    As weird as it was, the 80's was a great time to be a teenager. It was innocent and hedonistic at the same time. Most of us were selfish in a very humanistic way.
    It was whatever you wanted it to be and I'm glad that I experienced it and made the most of it. I doubt we'll ever see that kind of freedom and tolerance again.

    Well, thanks for the trip down memory lane. I hope it was as good for you as it was for me.

    Long live the Rubik's Cube [​IMG]
     
  20. vaclava krishna

    vaclava krishna Well-Known Member

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    Do you remember lying in bed
    With your tweed pulled up over your head?
     

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