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Reading thread

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by rjbman, Feb 16, 2013.

  1. Superb0bo

    Superb0bo Well-Known Member

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    I often do, but Im pursuing science as a career, and there are always new stuff to learn.
     
  2. wogbog

    wogbog Well-Known Member

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    I tend to have time set aside in the day to read both for information/school and for pleasure.
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2014
  3. noob in 89

    noob in 89 Well-Known Member

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    Gah, thanks goldentribe ... I pm'd to discover your thoughts on prose, found out you blocked me. :fu:

    I guess you were a stealth neuromancer fan after all. :facepalm:

    Random book thought: it can be hard with no IRL peeps left to nerd out with. Reading appears to be on the decline. Woe, woe....
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2014
  4. futuresailors

    futuresailors Well-Known Member

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    I think you were looking for "extolling".

    "Began" usually denotes a process rather than a direct action. If the train "decelerated ten kilometers from the airport" it would have lowered its speed at that point, but not necessarily continued to slow down for the rest of the distance. And if we want to give Gibson even more credit, the "average" distance it takes for a passenger train to stop is one mile, so in saying Case's train began decelerating 10km out, he's also implying that the train is moving at a high speed.

    But the virtue of Gibson's prose lies in the ways it's incorrect. Like Faulkner, his use of the vernacular reflects the culture he's commenting on.
     
    1 person likes this.
  5. noob in 89

    noob in 89 Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, this is sort of what I was curious about. Excerpted, it certainly lacks poetry, so I was wondering if maybe it worked better as a whole (or was at least intentional). Faulkner always sounds amazing, though, no matter what he's up to....

    Also: Yes, exclaiming! Chosen for the hyperbole. :)
     
  6. a bag of it

    a bag of it Well-Known Member

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    I have always felt this way to some extent. I have always felt that if I am going to spend the time to read a book, it better teach me something factual about the real world. When it comes to pure entertainment I would prefer a movie or tv show. I am starting to come around to the idea that fiction can be just as if not more informative than nonfiction. That is to say, I believe it is possible, but I have not really read any fiction books recently. Does anyone have any recommendations of must read fiction that is at least somewhat rooted in reality or at least discusses real world themes?
     
  7. Exdeath

    Exdeath Well-Known Member

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    this
     
  8. dan138zig

    dan138zig Well-Known Member

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    I found Henry miller's Tropic of Cancer to be mind opening. And maybe some bukowskis palahniuks.


    How are those different, you ask? Movies only demand 2 hours of my time, and that's why I prefer movies for entertainment.

    Edit: sorry if I sound curt. I'm just repeating your question so that you'll know what my reply is about.
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2014
  9. LonerMatt

    LonerMatt Well-Known Member

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    Hey guys, if you prefer movies and not books, there's a thread for that.

    There are literally hundreds of recommendations in this thread. Instead of asking for a recommendation of 'must read', why not go over the past posts where I and many others reviewed books and talked about them. Asking a question about the reviews would be more useful, or just looking at what we (collectively or individually) enjoyed and why would be a better use of your time, I think.

    That being said, if you consider fiction as 'just entertainment' perhaps no book will fix your banal attitude.

    Love,

    LonerMatt.
     
  10. LonerMatt

    LonerMatt Well-Known Member

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    The reason I posted those two quotes, in particular, is I found them not only evocative, but also enjoyed the cadence. I really enjoy it when writers use fairly grotesque settings/actions are a way of exploring a feeling or moment. I can't write down why (I don't know) and I can't phrase my ideas in a less wanky way because I'm not a beautiful writer myself. In a similar way to the Kupling quotes I posted a while a go - these ones are just small moments in a larger story - separate from the narrative/character/thematic content that stick out (to me) as parts where Gibson is actually writing - not also telling a story, advancing a plot, creating a world, etc.

    If you don't dig it, that's fine, but I tend to think ultra paired down writing is dull and boring (words are great, that's one of the reasons reading's great) and I also don't really think the extreme-fetish that is 'sparse prose' is helpful or meaningful. Saying a lot with a little is fine, letting the author really capture a reader with a careful, but elaborate, use of words is also great.

    Futuresailors makes an excellent point about the way the prose reflects the environment - and Gibson's influence certainly stems from the way he invented, subverted and twisted words to suit his world of the matrix, etc, etc, etc.
     
  11. dan138zig

    dan138zig Well-Known Member

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    You seem to have some problem with me, man. This is the reading thread, and discussion about the merit of fiction and whether nonfiction has more merit belongs here.
     
  12. wogbog

    wogbog Well-Known Member

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    That's a terrible discussion to have :p

    Comparing fiction to movies/TV seems weird because for me anyways reading and watching are very different experiences.
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2014
    2 people like this.
  13. eluther

    eluther Well-Known Member

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    every book ever written discusses real world themes! they were all written by human being, and as such, are inexorably tied to humans and whatever it is that humans do. think about anything you've ever read and it has something to say about how the world works and what people experience in different times and places.


    I don't like fighting on the Internet, but this is such a bullshit, sanctimonious attitude. if you don't want people asking about why you like what you like, you shouldn't be on an open forum. go cloister yourself away in an echo chamber of similarly pretentious assholes. if you don't want to make the most cursory of efforts to invite people into enjoying or understanding something you love, you have no business poisoning the well for that person and everyone else who truly cares about art and literature and wants to see people who don't understand it find books they love.

    saying, "read the thread for recommendations" is just fucking lazy. you could have saved yourself more time by just not replying, if that's your concern.
     
  14. a bag of it

    a bag of it Well-Known Member

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    Well of course that is true, but something like lord of the rings or harry potter, while loved by many, is not very much rooted in the real world. Sure you can extrapolate themes and apply them to the real world, but for me it is not the same as books actually about the real world. Similarly, books about the real world set in historic times are less applicable. Social interaction, economics, etc... are much different now than there were in say the 16th century. I'm not saying these books are less valuable, I'm just saying that they are less appealing to me personally.
     
  15. noob in 89

    noob in 89 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, Matt. I agree this stuff can feel highly personal, and difficult to talk about -- I suppose, for me, that's also part of the fun. Though mostly it feels like a gestalt thing -- a work either moves you, or it doesn't -- part of my project this year is to try to be more aggressive about digging into the particulars. I do love hearing people trying to quantify their enthusiasms.

    My favorite books, btw, would probably annoy the hell out of someone like James Wood. William Vollmann, David Foster Wallace, Reinaldo Arenas -- all *maximalist*!

    I'm on the fence about whether we should consume fiction like fiber, or a healthy snack, as if it was merely good for us, or an activity to suffer through, like exercise....life is too short. I am of course a huge fan of giving recs. :happy:
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2014
  16. futuresailors

    futuresailors Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]
     
    3 people like this.
  17. LonerMatt

    LonerMatt Well-Known Member

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    Really?

    ...and coming into a thread where literally 2/3s of the posts are recommendations and not bothering to read ANY of them isn't more lazy? Coming into a thread about reading and talking about films is off topic and unnecessary, especially when the comments amount to 'I prefer films to books'.

    Don't be contrite, I regularly contribute to this thread and write about what I read and whether or not I enjoyed it and why - if someone just wants personal recommendations this isn't a great place for it - it's also lazy. Especially when someone has basically said they aren't that interested in fiction that's 'not real'.
     
  18. eluther

    eluther Well-Known Member

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    Yes, really. If you don't want to give the person recommendations or do anything to persuade them, you're better off just ignoring it. It's not a moral affront to you for someone who's not interested in reading but is trying to figure out why others are interested in it to come into a thread on a public forum and ask about it. There's nothing than a desire to be precious about literature compelling you to respond.

    That attitude also completely overlooks part of what someone could be asking for, as well. If we continually talk about books we've read/liked/thought about/etc. maybe those aren't necessarily the books we'd recommend to someone in a position of "I don't read fiction." I would gladly discuss Gaddis at length in this post, but if someone's not a reader, I'd be dense as fuck to recommend the pick up The Recognitions. So, again, besides you shitty attitude, you're also being willfully obtuse. The discussion of a bunch of anonymous assholes into recondite fiction isn't a good place for a pedestrian to infer which books you would actually recommend they read. It's not being lazy. It's being confused or overwhelmed.

    Lastly, if you feel like this isn't a good place for recommendations, then feel free to not recommend anything. Much better than acting shitty toward someone actively interested in what you're doing.
     
  19. noob in 89

    noob in 89 Well-Known Member

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    This brings up an interesting question: What books do you usually recommend to those looking to get into contemporary literary fiction? And how far do they often run afield of your own tastes or inclinations?
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2014
  20. LonerMatt

    LonerMatt Well-Known Member

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    I gave them a recommendation: read the thread. I'll give them another: go to entertainment and culture, check the 50 book challenge thread, it's almost NOTHING BUT reviews, see if you like the sound of a few, give them a whirl. I'm sorry, but a part from a few posts about prose, almost all of this is incredibly accessible.

    That's both perfectly fine and completely useful - it's would be a lot quicker and more useful than waiting for people to post and respond anyway, and you'd actually learn a few things about who is a similar read to you and whose recommendations would be more useful as a whole.

    You're the one who is getting real self-righteous. I notice you've not posted any recommendations either, great job, *clap*.
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2014

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