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Random Food Questions Thread

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by kwilkinson, Apr 8, 2010.

  1. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Well-Known Member

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    Do tell.
    Check your PM.
     
  2. ChicagoRon

    ChicagoRon Well-Known Member

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    I am assuming you have the correct pan - and that you have purchased high quality saffron from the Spice Merchant....

    If the above are not true - somehow the recipe for Paella in the Blue Ribbon cookbook is fairly inauthentic, but it tastes friggin' amazing in the restaurant.
     
  3. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Well-Known Member

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    I am assuming you have the correct pan - and that you have purchased high quality saffron from the Spice Merchant....

    If the above are not true - somehow the recipe for Paella in the Blue Ribbon cookbook is fairly inauthentic, but it tastes friggin' amazing in the restaurant.


    My girlfriend just bought me a beautiful 14 inches (something she knows i'll never be able to give her). All-Clad. My baby is a baller, son. This will be the first time we've cooked in it. But yes, saffron is a given.
    BTW I'm trying to get her to stop by my house on her way up here and grab my stones.
     
  4. ChicagoRon

    ChicagoRon Well-Known Member

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    I thought you only have one stone [​IMG] All-clad? Paella pan? Didn't think it was necessary to go that high end, but congrats! My cousin whose dad was a Spanish/Portugese chef from Newark, NJ does it outside over a pit fire - I think it's a 32" or 36" anodized black steel pan.
     
  5. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Well-Known Member

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    All-clad? Paella pan? Didn't think it was necessary to go that high end, but congrats! My cousin whose dad was a Spanish/Portugese chef from Newark, NJ does it outside over a pit fire - I think it's a 32" or 36" anodized black steel pan.

    I don't think it is necessary to go that high end, but she doesn't know much about cookware, and everyone is pretty familiar with the name all-clad I believe. Plus, if I'm getting a free paella pan, might as well have the nicest one I can get! [​IMG]
     
  6. robin

    robin Well-Known Member

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    During the last big snow storm that Seattle had, some guys working at a local restaurant "borrowed" a giant paella pan from the kitchen to use as a sled. Took several people to carry it.
     
  7. jpeirpont

    jpeirpont Well-Known Member

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    missed the chicken thread ... but has anybody tried doing that chicken under a brick? i've been doing it for a couple of years and love it. spatchcock the chicken and flatten it. two-stage fire, put the chicken skin-side down on the off side and put a cement paver on top (wrapped in aluminum foil so you can reuse). cook most of the way through, then take off the paver and flip to cook the interior side over medium-direct heat. the skin comes out crisp that way and for some reason i'm too lazy to investigate without getting paid, the meat stays really moist.
    I use a similar method from the Cooks Illustrated BBQ & Grilling Cookbook, I love it.
     
  8. Rikkar501

    Rikkar501 Well-Known Member

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    What's the minimum quality for a steak to be seasoned with just salt and fresh pepper?
     
  9. ama

    ama Well-Known Member

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    Can someone tell me about preserved truffles? I recently found some for a good price and am considering getting some. They come in small jars, are on the small end and show salt and water on the ingredient list, presumably to give them a long shelf life. They are not swimming in the liquid, but there is a noticeable amount in there. Has anyone used these or knows about what, if anything, they would be appropriate for? Thanks!
     
  10. ama

    ama Well-Known Member

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  11. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Well-Known Member

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    They are good and bad. If you really need a kick of truffle in the summer, they are an infinitely better option than truffle oil or butter or any of that kind of bullshit. But at the same time, you can probably find fresh summer truffles which would be a better option than the preserved, IMO.

    Just by virtue of the fact that they are preserved, I would not shave them over a dish. I assume that they probably don't have that strikingly beautiful veiny quality that winter truffles do. But for doing things like flavoring liquids, sauces, soups, or whatever else you want, I imagine they offer some good flavor (although probably subdued compared to fresh obviously).

    I probably would pass on them, to be honest, but that's partially b/c I love eating truffles in season when the time is right and they are absolutely beautiful. It's exciting to me, and worth not indulging during the other 9 1/2 months of the year. But really, who gives a fuck what I would do with them. If you found them at a good price and want to try them then you should give it a shot and write back.
     
  12. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Well-Known Member

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    Summer truffles are fine for what they are, but they aren't really good truffles. Of course, it is winter in Australia right now, and Australian winter truffles are teh awesome, so I'd search those out. You don't see them everywhere. As far as canned truffles, I think they can be very good. What Kyle said about grating them over a dish is right, but grating black truffles over a dish is, IMO, a very bad way to eat them. If you make a vegetable ragout and add some sliced, chopped or julienned preserved truffles with a minute or so left in the cooking, it will be quite good.
     
  13. ama

    ama Well-Known Member

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    Thanks fellas. I'll try a couple out and write back how they fared in a some different applications.
     
  14. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Well-Known Member

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    Thanks fellas. I'll try a couple out and write back how they fared in a some different applications.
    Just to be clear, if they are canned tuber aestivum, don't buy them. Garbage. If they are canned tuber melanosporum, then they may be worth it.
     
  15. ama

    ama Well-Known Member

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    Just to be clear, if they are canned tuber aestivum, don't buy them. Garbage. If they are canned tuber melanosporum, then they may be worth it.

    They are definitely the latter. Thanks for the heads up.
     
  16. gomestar

    gomestar Well-Known Member

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    what can one do with some pork belly if their oven is too shitty to maintain 200 F for any amount of time?
     
  17. Alter

    Alter Well-Known Member

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  18. gomestar

    gomestar Well-Known Member

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    Japanese-style braised pork belly is heavenly:

    http://shizuokagourmet.wordpress.com...akuni-recipes/


    perfect, this looks excellent. I didn't want to do a full confit, so something like a braise would be ideal. And any excuse to drink leftover sake is good.
     
  19. Mblova

    Mblova Well-Known Member

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    Any recs on cooking/recipie books?
    Ruhlman/Keller?
     
  20. ChicagoRon

    ChicagoRon Well-Known Member

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    Unless you are RICH, have an AWESOME KITCHEN, and have some serious tools and training, Keller's books are for reading, not cooking. edit: Bouchon and Ad-Hoc can be cooked from, but they still require a lot of mise-en-place that might take you days to prepare in advance of making your meal Rhulmann has some other good collaborations, but for actual stuff to cook, I'd recommend some of the Julia Child / Jaques Pepin stuff or the JOY of Cooking. For something a little more kitschy / modern, I have really enjoyed the Bromberg Brothrers' "Blue Ribbon Cookbook"
     

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