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Raging Bull - Long Narrow Collars... really??

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by mjHession, Sep 21, 2010.

  1. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Well-Known Member

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  2. viator

    viator Well-Known Member

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  3. mack11211

    mack11211 Well-Known Member

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    The collars have appeared in Scorcese films of several periods.

    Raging Bull was made c. 1980 but is mostly set in the late 40s & early 50s, which was a time of exaggerated proportions in men's clothing generally.
     
  4. mjHession

    mjHession Well-Known Member

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    The collars have appeared in Scorcese films of several periods.

    Raging Bull was made c. 1980 but is mostly set in the late 40s & early 50s, which was a time of exaggerated proportions in men's clothing generally.


    Any evidence of this outside of hollywood. That's what I was having trouble finding.
     
  5. mjHession

    mjHession Well-Known Member

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    I couldn't find a picture, but I believe that there are scenes in Mean Streets (Little Italy, c. 1970?) where the fellas wear their neckties unknotted, i.e., they just loop them under and then let them hang straight down.

    Like this from the jazz singer

    [​IMG]

    Though this is a stage performance, he didn't wear his ties like this is most of the film.
     
  6. Shirtmaven

    Shirtmaven Well-Known Member

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    i have a few customers who still request those collars.
    not quite as close as Joe Pesci's but long and straight with an over lock.
     
  7. mack11211

    mack11211 Well-Known Member

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    Any evidence of this outside of hollywood. That's what I was having trouble finding.
    Here is one from the mid forties. Check the length of the points on the dress shirt & the sport shirt and on the uniform shirt the serviceman is wearing. It is part of a photostreeam that contains many more. After the wear, I think collars lengthened more, shoulders and lapels swelled and ties had their bold-patterned "ties that blind" moment, all part of the postwar exuberance. Jake LaMotta's first finds fame during this time.
     
  8. comrade

    comrade Well-Known Member

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    I couldn't find a picture, but I believe that there are scenes in Mean Streets (Little Italy, c. 1970?) where the fellas wear their neckties unknotted, i.e., they just loop them under and then let them hang straight down.

    That was (is?) another "Wiseguy" affectation
     
  9. Nataku

    Nataku Well-Known Member

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    Here is one from the mid forties. Check the length of the points on the dress shirt & the sport shirt and on the uniform shirt the serviceman is wearing. It is part of a photostreeam that contains many more.

    After the wear, I think collars lengthened more, shoulders and lapels swelled and ties had their bold-patterned "ties that blind" moment, all part of the postwar exuberance. Jake LaMotta's first finds fame during this time.



    Yep. This style collar was fairly common from the mid 40's to the mid 50's. They made a comeback in the late 60's and stuck around for a good decade. Here are a few actual examples from the mid 40's & early 50's

    http://www.rustyzipper.com/shop.cfm?...H=&GENDER=Mens

    http://www.rustyzipper.com/shop.cfm?...H=&GENDER=Mens

    http://www.rustyzipper.com/shop.cfm?...H=&GENDER=Mens

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  10. LabelKing

    LabelKing Well-Known Member

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    Tangential, but I just watched Casino tonight, and loved how at the end, they show the demise of the old Vegas with the visual of this gaggle of overweight people in tracksuits and casualwear stampeding in.
     
  11. Flieger

    Flieger Well-Known Member

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    Old Vegas would have suited you Labelking. New Vegas not so much. Maybe some casino were corrupt chinese party members engorge themselves in debauchery would fit you now.
     
  12. tinkle60

    tinkle60 Active Member

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    [​IMG]

    Bruce Lee wore some big ones in Enter the Dragon
     
  13. comrade

    comrade Well-Known Member

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    Nakatu's examples are right on for the 40s-50s sportshirts. In this case, shirts without collarbands.
    During this time my uncles, who were wealthy businessmen in New York, wore long point collar dress shirts,
    usually in "white on white" shirting. Their collars were not as extreme as those on the "wiseguys"
    in Raging Bull. My uncles were not gangsters but dressed in a style that at the time was called the
    "Broadway" style or something like it. It was also called "sharp" Member Mark Seitelman might be
    able to shed more light on this. In any case, it was the style favored by successful New York, or urban
    strivers. Shops which catered to this set were Leightons, and Nate Lewis among others. My Dad,
    a professional and and not a businessman and a bit of a snob, though from the same demographic,
    wore conservative Ivyish clothes: tweeds, bowties, etc in the same era.
     

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