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Put This On Season Two

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by YoungAmerican, Mar 5, 2012.

  1. YoungAmerican

    YoungAmerican Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]

    The season one DVD is now available. Just $16. Lots of extras. $30 for three if you promise to give two of them to guys who need them ;).
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2012
  2. YoungAmerican

    YoungAmerican Well-Known Member

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    [VIDEO][/VIDEO]

    Season 2, Episode 1: The Melting Pot

    Put This On, a web series about dressing like a grownup, visits New York City, a place where style is defined and redefined through interpretation and reinterpretation.

    Meet the 'Lo Heads. With roots in 1980s street gangs, these Polo Ralph Lauren enthusiasts have made "aspirational apparel" a lifestyle. They once had to boost their Polo from stores and fight to keep it on the streets. Today, their culture is worldwide, promulgated by hip-hop. Their hero is Ralph Lauren - a working class New Yorker who understood that the fantastical power of style can be transformative. Dallas Penn from The Internets Celebrities, a dedicated Lo Head (and former member of the Decepts crew) with a collection of over 1000 pieces of Polo apparel takes us on a tour of this remarkable fashion subculture.

    Visit Worth & Worth hat shop, a New York institution with roots going back to 1922. In recent memory, Orlando Palacios has made the shop a home for rockers as well as traditionalists, turning hundred-year-old machines to the task of reinterpreting hundred-year-old styles.

    Meet Jason Marshall, a jazz saxaphonist with a classic style. He plays with bands ranging from traditional bop to hip-hop fusion to Aretha Franklin, but he prefers to wear tailored clothes when he does it, and explains why.

    And in our Q & Answer segment, find out how to pack your suit for travel. We'll show you a fold to keep it neat inside a rolling carry-on or suitcase, and we'll show you how to keep your trousers on the hanger inside a garment bag.
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2012
    1 person likes this.
  3. StarterStyle

    StarterStyle Well-Known Member

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    And I thought Jesse Thorn looked like a sartorial vampire before he poured cultured milk on his head.
     
  4. YoungAmerican

    YoungAmerican Well-Known Member

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    I think after the kefir I look like some kind of crazy reverse Al Jolson.
     
  5. matty long legs

    matty long legs Well-Known Member

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    Great stuff as always, Jesse.
     
  6. Thrifter

    Thrifter Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Jesse! Great stuff as always.
     
  7. YoungAmerican

    YoungAmerican Well-Known Member

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    [VIDEO][/VIDEO]


    The Lo Heads


    [VIDEO][/VIDEO]


    Q & Answer: How to Pack & Fold a Suit for Travel


    [VIDEO][/VIDEO]


    PTO Place: Worth & Worth



    [VIDEO][/VIDEO]


    PTO Man: Jason Marshall
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2012
  8. clapeyron

    clapeyron Well-Known Member

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    the first 30secs reminded me of this:
     
  9. NORE

    NORE Well-Known Member

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    @Jesse: :slayer:
     
  10. ThinkDerm

    ThinkDerm Well-Known Member

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    same damn 'lo sweater, times is tough, and rough - like leather. :slayer:
     
  11. Thrifter

    Thrifter Well-Known Member

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    Always wondered what that meant. Thanks for making that connection for me.
     
  12. NORE

    NORE Well-Known Member

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    I'm still looking for the teddy bear wearing the RLPL suit sweater :slayer:
     
  13. ThinkDerm

    ThinkDerm Well-Known Member

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    :slayer:
     
  14. YoungAmerican

    YoungAmerican Well-Known Member

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    Thanks guys.

    We had a segment about the Polo Bear that almost made the cut, but we dropped it in the final edit.
     
  15. YoungAmerican

    YoungAmerican Well-Known Member

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    [VIDEO][/VIDEO]

    If anyone's hearing impaired, we added captions to the YouTube version of the video.
     
  16. NAMOR

    NAMOR Well-Known Member

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    been had polo
     
  17. NAMOR

    NAMOR Well-Known Member

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    but seriously, great tip on folding jackets. best one ive seen to date. same with the pants. thanks!
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2012
  18. NORE

    NORE Well-Known Member

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    :cloud:
     
  19. YoungAmerican

    YoungAmerican Well-Known Member

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    Here's something I wrote on the site today, in part to reply to the folks who've been asking me why we covered the Lo Heads in our first episode, when they're so far outside of our usual aesthetic.

    Learn to Speak the Language:

    Why the ‘Lo Heads are Masters of Sartorial Discourse

    Would I wear a sweater with a picture of a teddy bear wearing Polo business clothes? Or a Polo Golf tie with an illustration of a golfer on it? Or a black leather Polo suit? No way. A jacket that says “SNOW BEACH” on it? Absolutely not.

    So why did we feature ‘Lo Heads in our first episode? Wearing clothes that I wouldn’t wear myself, in ways I wouldn’t wear them?

    Dressing is a fundamentally discursive act. The most sophisticated dressers are engaged in a three-way conversation - between the creator of their clothing, themselves, and the people they interact with while dressed. This happens in the context of a broad set of only semi-shared cultural values. The designer intends one meaning, the wearer recombines it, recontextualizes it, and gives it new meaning, and then that meaning is interpreted by the people the wearer interacts with in ways that the wearer could never have conceived.

    I think that these guys, deeply immersed in this ‘Lo Heads culture, are incredibly fluent at this discourse. They’re living it. Any of us, no matter what our personal sense of aesthetics, or our personal goals for can learn from their example.

    So let’s break it down a little.

    The first level: there’s an interesting statement made, of course, when a black or Puerto Rican guy from the hood wears clothes that are self-consciously associated with activities (yachting, skiing, golf) that have powerful ties to whiteness and richness. The guy from the hood is subverting those values. His act is a thumb in the eye to the rich (and white) that says that not only can those symbols of privilege be appropriated by the downtrodden, the downtrodden can rock that shit better.

    Dallas describes the Polo-obsessed culture as a function of “Aspirational Apparel.” I think that’s part of it. When you’re “sick and tired of being sick and tired,” as one guy put it, you want to represent something for yourself that’s more than that. But here’s the limitation of that description: this is not a literal act. These are not poor people striving to be as much like rich people as possible. This is a symbolic act.

    We asked person after person, “would you get on a yacht?” “Have you ever been skiing?” “Do you like golf?” and to a man, the answer was a laughing “HELL no.”

    In other words: these folks don’t aspire to be the rich. They aspire to success, sure, like any of us, but they aren’t supplicating themselves before upper-class white culture, asking to be let in. They don’t aspire to join the club. They aspire to take the symbols of privilege and give them new meaning. To rock them better.

    In fact, if the clothes are worn in new ways - think of Dallas’ tie-outside-sweater look - all the better. Like hip-hop slang, the goal is to create an insider’s argot, a way of recombining these symbols of privilege into something with one meaning for people who “get it” and one meaning for people who don’t. Alienating the outsiders is part of creating an insider culture.

    There’s also something fascinating to me about the specific preferences that Polo collectors demonstrate. I was wearing a corduroy Polo blazer the night we recorded at Lo Goose on the Deuce (“all eras, all styles welcome,” it said on the invite). Needless to say, there weren’t a lot of other guys there rocking corduroy blazers - despite the fact that corduroy has a rich sporting heritage.

    Polo collectors like stuff with graphic and textual representations of the abstract class ideas they’re pursuing. Abstractions of abstractions. Ties with pictures of golfers. Jackets with pictures of skiiers. The Polo Bear.

    The Polo Bear is the perfect collectible for Lo Heads. He’s a brand icon who appears mostly on annually-released sweaters. A teddy bear who wears Polo clothes. That makes the Polo Bear sweater a representation of a representation of class, through an icon (a teddy bear) that’s completely non-human, for maximum abstraction.

    The reason the Polo fans love Ralph Lauren is that while he has always admired the aesthetics of English schools and Great-Gatsby Americana, he himself was a poor, Jewish New York kid. His name and brand were made up from whole cloth. His creations are fundamentally (and shamelessly) inauthentic. Their value is in how perfectly they celebrate an idea of Americanness that is both tied to race and class and somehow self-consciously cut off from it. The premise of his work is that he’s going to grab the symbols and aesthetics and rock them better.

    I don’t want to get too semiotic on you, but our clothes have very limited inherent values. Warm/not-warm and keeps the sun off are pretty much it. Maybe some portion of our aesthetic values are in-born, that’s an argument for a different day. Everything else about getting dressed is symbolic. You’re participating in a conversation. Learn to speak the language.
     

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