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Punch Resistance

Discussion in 'Health & Body' started by TyCooN, Feb 18, 2010.

  1. TyCooN

    TyCooN Well-Known Member

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    Anyone know the science behind this? Boxers can take punishment from combos from hard hitters like Tyson, Hearns, etc, but why do so many people get dropped by one hit out on the streets? Those random people can't hit as hard as guys who get paid to beat people up for a living.[​IMG]
     
  2. dhaller

    dhaller Well-Known Member

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    Anyone know the science behind this? Boxers can take punishment from combos from hard hitters like Tyson, Hearns, etc, but why do so many people get dropped by one hit out on the streets? Those random people can't hit as hard as guys who get paid to beat people up for a living.[​IMG]

    The obvious answer is defensive training and conditioning - there's a big difference between a boxer anticipating a punch and reacting defensively and some Joe Average on the street with zero reflexes who pretty much just stands there and absorbs the full impact of a punch. Ouch.

    As to "punch resistance" (which is the measure by which a fighter avoids a KO), there are three factors:
    i. Thickness of skull - this is genetic, obviously
    ii. Neck strength: A KO is caused by a blow which causes the brain to bounce around (it's suspended in a fluid matrix), bruising the surface. A stronger neck can act literally as a shock absorbed for the head, so that less force is transmitted to the brain (hence less rattling around in the skull).
    iii. Dehydration: Boxers dehydrate to hit their weight class, and dehydration reduces the level of fluid in the skull; less fluid - less brain-bounce = fewer KOs. Obviously, dehydration carries its own risk, but it does enhance punch resistance.

    DH
     
  3. theyare

    theyare Well-Known Member

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  4. Gradstudent78

    Gradstudent78 Well-Known Member

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    There is something to be said for being in a ring, knowing your going to get hit (being prepared for it), and knowing what it's generally going to feel like.

    That said, I've also seen plenty of boxers in golden gloves matches get a hard, direct hit and basically have the fight be over. Most of the time boxers are covered, moving, and absorbing the forces coming in from a punch. Majority of people on the street aren't doing these things.


    Also: You'd be suprised how hard a random person can hit with one punch and their entire body behind it, especially a fairly big guy. However, their ability to actually do it over and over again while keeping a defensive posture is severely lacking.
     
  5. iampeter

    iampeter Active Member

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    padded gloves?


    padded gloves are really just there to protect your hands, not your opponent [​IMG]

    they may reduce lbs per sq/inch but i doubt it makes a difference in the sport
     
  6. Tck13

    Tck13 Well-Known Member

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    Training to get hit helps the body to get used to getting hit. After the first three months of Muay Thai training or boxing or whatever the body gets used to being hit.

    It hurt like hell for the first couple of months of sparring but I got used to it after a while. The body adjusts.
     
  7. ter1413

    ter1413 Well-Known Member

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    Training to get hit helps the body to get used to getting hit. After the first three months of Muay Thai training or boxing or whatever the body gets used to being hit.

    It hurt like hell for the first couple of months of sparring but I got used to it after a while. The body adjusts.


    Conditioning and movement. Also, no Jagermeister in the system of the knocked out guy!
     
  8. bimmernate

    bimmernate Well-Known Member

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    i would probably build up some physical resistance via muscular development to the neck since I have heard a knockout is sudden energy exerted onto the brain stem in a way that literally shuts off your consciousness
     
  9. HgaleK

    HgaleK Well-Known Member

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    Anyone know the science behind this? Boxers can take punishment from combos from hard hitters like Tyson, Hearns, etc, but why do so many people get dropped by one hit out on the streets? Those random people can't hit as hard as guys who get paid to beat people up for a living.[​IMG]

    KO resistance or simple punch resistance? The first "fight" I ever got in to I hardly felt more than impact when I was hit for the most part. The exceptions were my nose and ear (the later of which hurt like a bitch). 8-10 minutes after the fight was when it started to hurt. It was the same in boxing. When adrenaline is pounding through you, only certain really sensitive spots (I've been told that the legs feel it from a buddy of mine who kick boxes) feel the same sting that you do when you're hit in other circumstances.

    KO resistance can be built with neck strength, but the boxing coach said that it was one of those things that you either had or you didn't, and that there wasn't much that could be done for it. I haven't seen to many knockouts in boxing though, and most of those that I have were by the time the guy was so exhausted that he could hardly stand anyway.
     
  10. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member

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    padded gloves are really just there to protect your hands, not your opponent [​IMG]

    they may reduce lbs per sq/inch but i doubt it makes a difference in the sport


    Actually, padded gloves do a lot. The impact is absorbed over a larger area. You just don't get the same sudden jarring that you get when you get hit with a bare fist or a light (MMA style = 4 ounce) glove, although the total energy absorbed is the same. This is one of the reasons brain stem KOs happen in MMA so much more than in boxing.

    Of course, over time, those repeated shots really take it out of you, which is why MMA is often considered much less damaging to the brain than boxing. Having competed in both MMA and kickboxing, I'd agree with the assessment.

    And yeah, a fairly big guy can still hit, even if he has no training. His form, etc... will be completely off - he will probably load up his right and then drop it to swing from his hips, but if he catches you... ouch...
     
  11. bBoy JEe

    bBoy JEe Well-Known Member

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    Actually, padded gloves do a lot. The impact is absorbed over a larger area. You just don't get the same sudden jarring that you get when you get hit with a bare fist or a light (MMA style = 4 ounce) glove, although the total energy absorbed is the same. This is one of the reasons brain stem KOs happen in MMA so much more than in boxing.

    Of course, over time, those repeated shots really take it out of you, which is why MMA is often considered much less damaging to the brain than boxing. Having competed in both MMA and kickboxing, I'd agree with the assessment.

    And yeah, a fairly big guy can still hit, even if he has no training. His form, etc... will be completely off - he will probably load up his right and then drop it to swing from his hips, but if he catches you... ouch...


    I like to swing from the hips. It makes it that much easier to hit your opponent in the 'nads. JYT taught me that one! [​IMG]
     
  12. TyCooN

    TyCooN Well-Known Member

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    The first "fight" I ever got in to I hardly felt more than impact when I was hit for the most part. The exceptions were my nose and ear (the later of which hurt like a bitch). 8-10 minutes after the fight was when it started to hurt.
    For sure bro. I've been hit in the eyes, head, and nose in school fights but I didn't feel the bruises until a few days later. The first real punch that actually snapped my head was a leaping right hook while sparring.
    KO resistance can be built with neck strength, but the boxing coach said that it was one of those things that you either had or you didn't, and that there wasn't much that could be done for it. I haven't seen to many knockouts in boxing though, and most of those that I have were by the time the guy was so exhausted that he could hardly stand anyway.
    IMPORTANT NOTICE: No media files are hosted on these forums. By clicking the link below you agree to view content from an external website. We can not be held responsible for the suitability or legality of this material. If the video does not play, wait a minute or try again later. I AGREE

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  13. West24

    West24 Well-Known Member

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    its pretty much knowing that youre going to get hit. as the saying goes, its the one you didnt see coming. thats what generally knocks out boxers and people in the street. obviously being hit many times and practicing helps when taking a punch. as was said above someones "chin" has a huge deal to do with it. some people are extremely hard to knock out, and some people have glass chins. ive only ever been knocked down once in boxing, (knock on wood) and that was with a straight shot to the solar plexus. its funny how you can still try to stay up and man up when hit with a good shot to the head, but a good shot to the body and youre paralyzed. no matter how much heart, or will etc the person is going down.
     
  14. TyCooN

    TyCooN Well-Known Member

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    its pretty much knowing that youre going to get hit. as the saying goes, its the one you didnt see coming. thats what generally knocks out boxers and people in the street. obviously being hit many times and practicing helps when taking a punch. as was said above someones "chin" has a huge deal to do with it. some people are extremely hard to knock out, and some people have glass chins. ive only ever been knocked down once in boxing, (knock on wood) and that was with a straight shot to the solar plexus. its funny how you can still try to stay up and man up when hit with a good shot to the head, but a good shot to the body and youre paralyzed. no matter how much heart, or will etc the person is going down.
    This is true. Worse place to get hit is the liver.
     
  15. Nil

    Nil Well-Known Member

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    Agreed. I only spar but the closest I ever went to going down was a hard hook to the midsection. My legs instantly turned to jello and all my energy was zapped out of me.
     
  16. TyCooN

    TyCooN Well-Known Member

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    Agreed. I only spar but the closest I ever went to going down was a hard hook to the midsection. My legs instantly turned to jello and all my energy was zapped out of me.
    Just AZZk Oscar:
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  17. CDFS

    CDFS Well-Known Member

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    For sure bro. I've been hit in the eyes, head, and nose in school fights but I didn't feel the bruises until a few days later. The first real punch that actually snapped my head was a leaping right hook while sparring.
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    TIP: to embed Youtube clips, put only the encoded part of the Youtube URL, e.g. eBGIQ7ZuuiU between the tags. There's an example. Fast forward to 0:22. His legs give with that left hook.

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    It's not hard. [metube]TjX-_JtV5Ss[/metube]
     
  18. HgaleK

    HgaleK Well-Known Member

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    For sure bro. I've been hit in the eyes, head, and nose in school fights but I didn't feel the bruises until a few days later. The first real punch that actually snapped my head was a leaping right hook while sparring.


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    There's an example. Fast forward to 0:22. His legs give with that left hook.


    It seems like it's always a good hook that does it. I wasn't saying that knockouts don't happen in boxing, but that I haven't seen too many in person and that I've never had one in the ring. In high school it came down to cardio and form- not many people had the muscle or the experience to land a knockout hit with gloves. I'd be interested to know how most pro matches end though.
     
  19. Tck13

    Tck13 Well-Known Member

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    And yeah, a fairly big guy can still hit, even if he has no training. His form, etc... will be completely off - he will probably load up his right and then drop it to swing from his hips, but if he catches you... ouch...

    That's what happened the night that I had my first fight. Another member of my gym was easily winning the fight but at the end of the first round his opponent caught him with a wild punch and knocked him down/out. He got up and was ok after the 8 count but they stopped the fight anyway.

    It really sucked because the other guy was just not as good but he got lucky.

    its pretty much knowing that youre going to get hit. as the saying goes, its the one you didnt see coming. thats what generally knocks out boxers and people in the street. obviously being hit many times and practicing helps when taking a punch. as was said above someones "chin" has a huge deal to do with it. some people are extremely hard to knock out, and some people have glass chins. ive only ever been knocked down once in boxing, (knock on wood) and that was with a straight shot to the solar plexus. its funny how you can still try to stay up and man up when hit with a good shot to the head, but a good shot to the body and youre paralyzed. no matter how much heart, or will etc the person is going down.

    People so underestimate the body shots. They take so much energy out of the opponent. In my first fight I could tell my opponent was very tired but the body shots (knees) I took made me MORE tired...

    This is true. Worse place to get hit is the liver.

    I don't know. Liver, spleen, kidneys. They all suck. The good thing is if one hits someone there and knocks them down it usually takes about 15-20 seconds to recover which is much longer than the 10 seconds that the ref is giving them... [​IMG]
     
  20. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member

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    It seems like it's always a good hook that does it. I wasn't saying that knockouts don't happen in boxing, but that I haven't seen too many in person and that I've never had one in the ring. In high school it came down to cardio and form- not many people had the muscle or the experience to land a knockout hit with gloves. I'd be interested to know how most pro matches end though.
    One punch KOs are pretty rare. TKOs are much more common (when the ref is bad, the guy is essentially out on his feet, which is when real damage happens,) and KOs usually happen as only after a flurry of punches. In MMA, it's much more common to see a straight up KO. The canonical KO combination is an uppercut that raises the chin from the shoulder, followed by a left hook that puts the lights out.
    That's what happened the night that I had my first fight. Another member of my gym was easily winning the fight but at the end of the first round his opponent caught him with a wild punch and knocked him down/out. He got up and was ok after the 8 count but they stopped the fight anyway. It really sucked because the other guy was just not as good but he got lucky.
    I always trust the refs decision in stuff like this, especially for beginning fighters. IMO, a standing 8 is the worse thing for a boxer, and really, the main reason MMA is a much more benign sport in the long run. In MMA, there is no time for a fighter who is essentially out to recover, and the fight is over before he can really take damage that will hurt him years down the road. I dunno what you mean by "not as good," but it's pretty good strategy to brawl a better boxer. Forcing your opponent to fight your fight is sound strategy. Make him uncomfortable. If he likes to fight from the outside, make him trade in the clinch. If he likes to fight in the pocket, pepper him with jabs. If he is a beginner, but technically sound, and you are more experienced, but technically not as good, use your footwork to force him into the shooting zone, where power shots count.
    I was always taught to punish the body, punish the body, punish the body, make him want to quit.
    Head KOs, you wake up in the change room. Body KO's, you writhe on the ground. My favorite strike is a liver kick.
     

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