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Permanent pants creases in bespoke suits?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by armscye, May 14, 2005.

  1. armscye

    armscye Well-Known Member

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    In the May GQ, there is a piece on tailor to the stars Jack Victor, in which the standard Jack Victor pant is described as having slash front pockerts, no rear pockets, and creases that are "permanent" because they are stitched in.

    I have seen military and western garments with creases defined by a row of stitching, but never a dress suit.

    Comments? Experience?
     
  2. Kent Wang

    Kent Wang Well-Known Member

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    You know, I read the same article and was similarly puzzled.
     
  3. The_Foxx

    The_Foxx Well-Known Member

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    I know the tailor is famous, but that looked/ sounded ridiculous to me-- as did his slightly-western inspired trousers, which pockets that looked like the "dress pants" made by Wrangler.....ugh. Those crazy californians.....
     
  4. Kent Wang

    Kent Wang Well-Known Member

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    Have you ever thought that GQ writes nothing but hagiography? I only recently came to this conclusion. Especially the articles covering the front cover celebrity. I only read a small fraction of the articles now and find that the ads and photos are far more useful as a stylebook than the text.
     
  5. Alias

    Alias Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, what Kent said.

    The Korean version of GQ kicks all sorts of ass in this regard. Photos upon photos upon photos.

    I doubt this "tailor" could ever do what the author claims he could do. I mean, he disses A&S for being "factory-made," for crying out loud. I wonder how his workshop differs from theirs; they're all factories in some sense.
     
  6. johnnynorman3

    johnnynorman3 Well-Known Member

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    How can Jack Taylor be called "The Best Tailor in America" when he doesn't even stitch anything?  How ridiculous.  Give me access to the finest H. Lesser fabrics, a team of "Asian women" (GQs description of Taylor's workforce), and a few stock patterns (if Taylor doesn't stitch anything, I'm doubting he's drawing individual paper patterns, or cutting anything) and I bet I could "make" some pretty nice looking and well fitting suits as well.
     
  7. novalis

    novalis Well-Known Member

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    Hehe, Mr. Taylor seems to get the same reaction from a lot of people. Â But before we all gang up on an octagenarian, let me do mention that Taylor suits are indeed bespoke in terms of an individual pattern. Â Granted, the pattern is not cut by Mr. Taylor but by his head tailor of some 20 years. Â That is called experience (and arthritis) I believe. Â Anyway, his suits looked superb when I visited. Â I wrote about my visit on AskAndy.
     
  8. Alias

    Alias Well-Known Member

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    Well, the Departures article someone linked to over at AA says that Taylor hasn't sewn a stitch in his life, and that he is something more like a stylist. $3,000 for a stylist? Bleh. Maybe that's good for people who have no idea what they want out of bespoke, but it's not for me.
     
  9. novalis

    novalis Well-Known Member

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    I think I understand where you're coming from. But I would simply suggest that the best way to judge a tailor is by the quality of the end product (e.g. the suit, jacket or the garment in question), not by what others say about the tailor or what a tailor says about other tailors.
     
  10. johnnynorman3

    johnnynorman3 Well-Known Member

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    Look, a Jack Taylor suit is worth what it's worth, regardless of whether he actually does the stitches. I just object to calling him a "tailor."
     
  11. novalis

    novalis Well-Known Member

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    Well, the problem is that people have been calling him Taylor all his life [​IMG]
     
  12. Vintage Gent

    Vintage Gent Well-Known Member

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    (johnnynorman3 @ May 18 2005,10:06) Look, a Jack Taylor suit is worth what it's worth, regardless of whether he actually does the stitches. I just object to calling him a "tailor."
    Well, the problem is that people have been calling him Taylor all his life [​IMG]
    It rather reminds one of the Seinfeld episode in which the library investigator is a Mr. Bookman. KRAMER: Bookman? The library investigator's name is actually, Bookman? LIBRARIAN: (Nodding) It's true. KRAMER: That's amazing. That's like an ice cream man named Cone.
     

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