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Opening a bottle of Champagne. Instructional.

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by dkzzzz, Dec 21, 2006.

  1. Concordia

    Concordia Well-Known Member

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    A tea towel gives better grip. Also, rotating the bottle while holding the cork stationary gives finer control over the speed of the operation.
     
  2. cuffthis

    cuffthis Well-Known Member

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    I gotta disagree with this. Much less shaking when you hold the bottle stationary and ease the cork out with your thumb and index finger.

    I open about a dozen Champagne and other sparkling wines a day this way. Trust me, it works.

    Rotating the bottle while holding the cork stationary gives finer control over the speed of the operation.
     
  3. Concordia

    Concordia Well-Known Member

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    I gotta disagree with this. Much less shaking when you hold the bottle stationary and ease the cork out with your thumb and index finger.

    I open about a dozen Champagne and other sparkling wines a day this way. Trust me, it works.


    Practice makes perfect.

    In my imperfect world, a cork that is really jammed in is one I am not anxious to dislodge with two fingers. So when I get a nasty one, I hold on tight and twist the bottle. Prevents the worst catastrophes.
     
  4. JeffC

    JeffC Well-Known Member

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    I gotta disagree with this. Much less shaking when you hold the bottle stationary and ease the cork out with your thumb and index finger.

    I open about a dozen Champagne and other sparkling wines a day this way. Trust me, it works.


    By "easing the cork out," do you mean twist back and forth? If so, there would be less shaking with one smooth twist of the bottle.
     
  5. cuffthis

    cuffthis Well-Known Member

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    I have found that if you loosen the safety wire and then use your thumb and forefinger to lightly push up on the cork, it will gradually and slowly (and safely) come out, with little or no noise (and no spillage). The key is to hold the bottle still while you do this.

    Everyone wants to hold the cork still and turn the bottle. This CAN work but it often results in a loud pop, spillage, or in a worst case scenario, an airborne cork. Holding the bottle still takes a couple tries but it really results in a much more elegant and safe opening, IMHO.

    By "easing the cork out," do you mean twist back and forth? If so, there would be less shaking with one smooth twist of the bottle.
     
  6. Mr. Checks

    Mr. Checks Well-Known Member

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    I have found that if you loosen the safety wire and then use your thumb and forefinger to lightly push up on the cork, it will gradually and slowly (and safely) come out, with little or no noise (and no spillage). The key is to hold the bottle still while you do this.

    Everyone wants to hold the cork still and turn the bottle. This CAN work but it often results in a loud pop, spillage, or in a worst case scenario, an airborne cork. Holding the bottle still takes a couple tries but it really results in a much more elegant and safe opening, IMHO.


    It's good to be careful.
    I once represented the Portuguese concern that makes much of the world's cork for, you guessed it, putting someone's eye out.
    "Funny" in the abstract, quite gross in reality.
     
  7. Kent Wang

    Kent Wang Well-Known Member

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    Have they made synthetic corks for sparkling wines yet?
     
  8. romafan

    romafan Well-Known Member

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    It's good to be careful.
    I once represented the Portuguese concern that makes much of the world's cork for, you guessed it, putting someone's eye out.
    "Funny" in the abstract, quite gross in reality.


    GT's suggestion of placing a (nice) dishtowel over the top immediately after the safety cage is removed is a good one. No blinded eyes/shattered light fixtures/etc. [​IMG]
     
  9. Reggs

    Reggs Well-Known Member

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    About 4 mins ago I used a meat cleaver and it was flawless. [​IMG]

    Happy new year.
     

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