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Now that Apple is Windows-compatible, to switch or not to switch to Mac?

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by von Rothbart, Apr 5, 2006.

  1. Tokyo Slim

    Tokyo Slim Well-Known Member

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    Apple has just "updated" the brightness and contrast ratio on the 30 inch ACD to match the Dell. Like last week.

    I might be mistaken, but I remember the 17" Apple Cinema display started out as a 1024x640 but then switched to 1600x1024 native a while before it was discontinued. I have the feeling they changed out the entire LCD package halfway through its short run. I remember looking at a 1024x768 and asking myself why the hell anyone would buy a $1500 monitor with no better than average resolution for its time.

    I can probably find other examples if I look hard enough, I'm just lazy.
     
  2. Tokyo Slim

    Tokyo Slim Well-Known Member

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    People with such panels can just get a new one under warranty.

    Yeah, if apple admits that there is a problem with them, which they didn't for quite a while obviously, judging by the way people on Mac forums are STILL talking about it. Look it up. I guess quite a few people were just hung out to dry on the whole deal.
     
  3. SGladwell

    SGladwell Well-Known Member

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    I might be mistaken, but I remember the 17" Apple Cinema display started out as a 1024x640 but then switched to 1600x1024 native a while before it was discontinued.

    I believe you are mistaken. Apple's 17" LCD's were always 100dpi or 1280x1024 (4:3 aspect ratio Studio display)/1440x990 (16:10 aspect ratio Cinema standalone display and every 17" iMac display beginning with the G4 "iLamp" model). Though on second thought I'm not sure they've ever sold a standalone 17" widescreen ("Cinema") display. I just remember the 4:3 Studio model, though I could be wrong.

    Apple (rightly, IMO) has long considered around 100dpi to be the optimal pixel density for a computer monitor. The current MacBook Pro has tighter pixel density, more and it's far more fatiguing to look at than a 100dpi monitor for my eyes.
     
  4. Babar

    Babar Well-Known Member

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    I believe you are mistaken. Apple's 17" LCD's were always 100dpi or 1280x1024

    This is correct
     
  5. skalogre

    skalogre Well-Known Member

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    First of all, I have to say that I find Cringely to often be a biased windbag - however he has some interesting things to say about Boot Camp on his latest article. Not that surprising, perhaps but nonetheless...

    http://www.pbs.org/cringely/pulpit/pulpit20060406.html
     
  6. SGladwell

    SGladwell Well-Known Member

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    Stats from Intel:

    35-40% of its processors sold do NOT go to major PC vendors. (Dell, HP, Sony, Apple) But to custom builders, and local parts shops.

    Seems like I represent a larger peice of the pie than you would like to believe...


    Not really. All that means is that the major vendors control 30+% of the market worldwide PC market - probably more than that in the West, and closer to 1% in many developing countries - but that store brands, "white box" machines, (on a much smaller scale) outfits that cater to gamers, and the like represent the majority of the market. DIYers I think would be lucky to be 0.2-0.3% of the market. That's still a relatively large number of people, to be sure, but nowhere near the importance you seem to ascribe to them.
     
  7. Brian SD

    Brian SD Well-Known Member

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    Audi sucks.
     
  8. Tokyo Slim

    Tokyo Slim Well-Known Member

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    Not really. All that means is that the major vendors control 30+% of the market worldwide PC market - probably more than that in the West, and closer to 1% in many developing countries - but that store brands, "white box" machines, (on a much smaller scale) outfits that cater to gamers, and the like represent the majority of the market. DIYers I think would be lucky to be 0.2-0.3% of the market. That's still a relatively large number of people, to be sure, but nowhere near the importance you seem to ascribe to them.
    Now this is confusing. Can you explain this, because what I'm reading makes no sense. The fact that major computer manufacturers use 35-40% of the total Intel chips made, leads you to believe that Comp USA, mom and pop computer stores, and custom gaming sites take up 60-65% of the world's Intel processors? I somehow find this logic faulty.Especially when I know for a fact that "dedicated gaming computers" are only between 5 and 10% of computers sold. The world's most successful gaming computer company Alienware, is now owned by Dell and I would include that in the Major PC manufacturers category. I think more standalone processors are sold to consumers than you realize. Intel is by far the largest consumer CPU manufacturer BTW, AMD (which I have been using almost exclusivly for the last uh... 5 years or so... only has between 17-19% market share. I don't know where you are getting the two tenths of a percent of people build or upgrade their computers thing, cause I think you are seriously underestimating the numbers. Hell, most of the people on THIS BOARD have upgraded their computer, Mac or no. I know that PC Stop, Fry's, CompUSA and online retailers like mwave and directron sell a whole lot more retail box or OEM processors than you think they do.
     
  9. mussel

    mussel Well-Known Member

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    Audi sucks.

    Acceleration Under Demonic Influence.
     
  10. imageWIS

    imageWIS Well-Known Member

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    Audi sucks.

    Actually it blows...







































    ...away the competition.

    Jon.
     
  11. imageWIS

    imageWIS Well-Known Member

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    Acceleration Under Demonic Influence.

    That would be the Audi RS4. (or me driving [​IMG] )

    Jon.
     
  12. SGladwell

    SGladwell Well-Known Member

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    The fact that major computer manufacturers use 35-40% of the total Intel chips made, leads you to believe that Comp USA, mom and pop computer stores, and custom gaming sites take up 60-65% of the world's Intel processors?

    Yes.

    The vast majority of those Intel chips not sold to the majors go to the minors (i.e. store house brand computers, the "white box" computers that dominate much of the international market, and so on) with hobbyists accounting for basically nothing. Keep in mind that most of those "loose" chips that are sold in the USA end up getting exported to someplace like India, South Africa, or Poland and turned into white box computers for their domestic markets. The majors have almost no presence outside of the West, and even then their position in the US is far stronger than it is in Europe. The world's largest one-day volume of computer turnover in history (about a quarter million machines in one German workday, or about 35 minutes [​IMG] ) was a bunch of white boxes sold by the supermarket chain Aldi in 2001 or 2002.

    It may seem like a large number to you, because perhaps lots of people in your circles do that sort of thing. And on an absolute scale 0.2% of chips produced is a pretty large number. But that is not representative of the population at large by any means.
     
  13. von Rothbart

    von Rothbart Well-Known Member

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    Acceleration Under Demonic Influence.
    That would be the Audi RS4. (or me driving [​IMG] )

    Jon.



    Jon, you may be too young to remember. It's a reference to late 80's during which Audis reportedly lunged forward when shifting from parking postion, causing fatalities, injuries and of course law suits ensued. However, the Highway Safety didn't find anything wrong. Audi sales nose dived and it took them many years and 2 generations of resign to recover.
     
  14. ATM

    ATM Well-Known Member

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    Jon, you may be too young to remember. It's a reference to late 80's during which Audis reportedly lunged forward when shifting from parking postion, causing fatalities, injuries and of course law suits ensued. However, the Highway Safety didn't find anything wrong. Audi sales nose dived and it took them many years and 2 generations of resign to recover.
    Wasn't it determined that the pedals were closer together than in other cars which caused some people to put their foot on the gas instead of (or in addition to) the brake when shifting from park to drive?
     
  15. imageWIS

    imageWIS Well-Known Member

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    Wasn't it determined that the pedals were closer together than in other cars which caused some people to put their foot on the gas instead of (or in addition to) the brake when shifting from park to drive?
    Yes. That’s exactly what happened (I’m not to young to remember the incident, although the catch phrase is a new one on me, but it’s very cool nonetheless, esp. with the S4 & RS4). The automatic cars were made like manual cars, but instead of three pedals, they simply removed the clutch. But, on a manual car, the break pedal is a lot smaller to accommodate the clutch, so people (idiots) confused the break pedal for the gas pedal, and well… Most automatic cars (including modern Audi’s) have large break pedals which differentiate them from the gas pedal. Jon.
     
  16. Tokyo Slim

    Tokyo Slim Well-Known Member

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    Yes. The vast majority of those Intel chips not sold to the majors go to the minors (i.e. store house brand computers, the "white box" computers that dominate much of the international market, and so on) with hobbyists accounting for basically nothing. Keep in mind that most of those "loose" chips that are sold in the USA end up getting exported to someplace like India, South Africa, or Poland and turned into white box computers for their domestic markets. The majors have almost no presence outside of the West, and even then their position in the US is far stronger than it is in Europe. The world's largest one-day volume of computer turnover in history (about a quarter million machines in one German workday, or about 35 minutes [​IMG] ) was a bunch of white boxes sold by the supermarket chain Aldi in 2001 or 2002. It may seem like a large number to you, because perhaps lots of people in your circles do that sort of thing. And on an absolute scale 0.2% of chips produced is a pretty large number. But that is not representative of the population at large by any means.
    I would like to see some hard data on this if you can find some. I worked in the PC sales industry for a year or two and have never heard of such obscene numbers. I doubt one good day in Germany is enough to account for it. (there are only about 28 Million computers in Germany BTW, according to the International Telecommunications Union) 60% of the desktop/server chips Intel sold in 2005 would come to about eleven and a half billion dollars. I have a hard time believing that the U.S. with the second highest percentage of computers per capita in the world (San Marino is the highest) and BY FAR the most amount of PC's in the world (161 million +, Japan is second with 40 million) is sending MOST of its Intel processors overseas. We are by far the largest computer market in the world. China is gaining speed, but not really that close, Japan is closer, but isn't gaining much ground due to saturation and personal space issues. So Where do we send that eleven and a half billion dollars worth of CPU's?
     
  17. SGladwell

    SGladwell Well-Known Member

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    Wasn't it determined that the pedals were closer together than in other cars which caused some people to put their foot on the gas instead of (or in addition to) the brake when shifting from park to drive?

    No. To be more specific, the pedal spacing in the Audi 5000 was only closer than that of inferior cars, which is to say American boats designed from the ground up to be crippled with slushboxes rather than good cars designed to have three pedals on the floor. The contemporary Honda Civic had pedal size and relative placement almost identical to the 5000's.

    Even though that 60 Minutes story was probably one of the worst in American journalistic history that did not lead to a war - see "Sinking of the Maine" or "WMD in Iraq" for truly serious examples of American journalistic failure - my own thoughts are that anyone who bought a slushbox Audi 5000 deserved to suffer anyway.
     
  18. mussel

    mussel Well-Known Member

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    Another free program, Parallels, let you run both Windows and OS X. What's different from Boot Camp is that this one let you run both simulteously. The beta program is free while the final version is not.
     
  19. A Y

    A Y Well-Known Member

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    Another free program, Parallels, let you run both Windows and OS X. What's different from Boot Camp is that this one let you run both simulteously. The beta program is free while the final version is not.

    This is what Apple should have introduced. I really don't understand the big deal everyone seems to have made about Boot Camp --- rebooting is ridiculous, not to mention the fact that you can't even share data between Windows and OS X with Boot Camp. VMware has been doing virtualized OSes for a while on Pentiums, and the Pentium chips have had hardware assistance for virtualization since, arguably, forever.

    --Andre
     
  20. Manny Calavera

    Manny Calavera Well-Known Member

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    This is what Apple should have introduced. I really don't understand the big deal everyone seems to have made about Boot Camp --- rebooting is ridiculous, not to mention the fact that you can't even share data between Windows and OS X with Boot Camp. VMware has been doing virtualized OSes for a while on Pentiums, and the Pentium chips have had hardware assistance for virtualization since, arguably, forever.

    --Andre


    BUT. But, does Parallels let you triple boot to include Linux?
     

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