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Military Boot Camp for Civilians?

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by tiecollector, Apr 1, 2008.

  1. tiecollector

    tiecollector Well-Known Member

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    Breakthrough the anger. Didn't know I had so much of that.
    You still seem like you got some left over [​IMG]. Pretty crazy though. I'm not ruling it out either. This last year has been rough for me, believe it or not the only thing that kept me sane was my cat, no joke. I think a lot of people get into tough times and do what you did or join the military or something like that.
     
  2. johnapril

    johnapril Well-Known Member

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    You still seem like you got some left over [​IMG]. Pretty crazy though. I'm not ruling it out either. This last year has been rough for me, believe it or not the only thing that kept me sane was my cat, no joke. I think a lot of people get into tough times and do what you did or join the military or something like that.
    Well, the "anger" now has no real power left in it. For the most apart arguing on this board has done nothing but inform me and help me work on my arguing strategies when I brush with politics at work. I basically feel like the least informed person around here, and I soak everything up. But the anger I feel now is nothing like when I was 24. Frankly, I think aging helped more than the meditation, in this regard. Being married has also been a mollifying influence. The main thing is that I had an experience where I found myself free of the weight of the anger, whereas before that experience, I thought anger was inescapable. I have siblings and colleagues who are burdened by anger in ways I will never be because I had a reality check while sitting on a hard floor.
     
  3. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Well-Known Member

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    Was it a hard adjustment coming back to civilian life in the States?

    It seems like it'd almost be hard to re-assimilate yourself into such a fast-paced, frantic culture after something like that.
     
  4. johnapril

    johnapril Well-Known Member

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    Was it a hard adjustment coming back to civilian life in the States? It seems like it'd almost be hard to re-assimilate yourself into such a fast-paced, frantic culture after something like that.
    It was horrific. I lived alone in a mountain cabin for 2 years, then wandered around Asia alone on $5/day for another year before settling back in the Midwest where my American roots are. Another year to find a job that I could sink my teeth into; that was perhaps the most difficult part of reassimilating. Terrifically humbling to find yourself a grocery store clerk doing the night shift at 29 years old. Finally found a position I could sink my teeth into in pharma, and never looked back.
     
  5. GQgeek

    GQgeek Well-Known Member

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    I had to relearn. It took me three years to re-enter society.

    And that's when you started posting on SF? For a long time your posts made absolutley no sense. [​IMG]
     
  6. globetrotter

    globetrotter Well-Known Member

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    When the war started I almost joined the military but for reasons I won't go into here I'm glad I didn't. I would, however, still like to experience boot camp, especially a Navy SEAL type thing. Is there anything available for civilians? Will the military let you visit just to kick your ass for a few weeks?

    TC,

    looking back, my earlier post was harsh - I have to stop posting from my blackberry from moving taxis.

    I honestly don't think that the specific thing you are looking for is such a good idea. but there are other options


    1. outward bound type camps - not just by OB, there are various organizations that will take you out to the wilds and run you around. very challenging

    2. there are thai camps that do 6 hours a day or muey thai - also very challenging, but you get to have thai food every night, and spend a few hours recuperating on the beach

    3. apalachian trail (or other treks) walk 8 hours a day. build a fire, sleep, repeat every day for months. very challenging

    4. the IDF base that teaches krav maga is also a sports college - called wingate. they have various camps that teach krav all day for 2 weeks, or several weeks. it is on the beach, but not the nice, hot chicks and umbrella drinks type of beach but the nasty, running on the beach and getting sand in everything while you puke type of beach. that may be the closest thing to what you are looking for.
     
  7. johnapril

    johnapril Well-Known Member

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    Spinning off Zach's suggestions:

    The walk to Everest base camp is terrifically challenging, especially the foothills, as you are not walking up a river valley but rather over the ribs of a foothill range, up and down for about 2 weeks.
     
  8. tiecollector

    tiecollector Well-Known Member

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    TC,

    looking back, my earlier post was harsh - I have to stop posting from my blackberry from moving taxis.

    I honestly don't think that the specific thing you are looking for is such a good idea. but there are other options


    1. outward bound type camps - not just by OB, there are various organizations that will take you out to the wilds and run you around. very challenging

    2. there are thai camps that do 6 hours a day or muey thai - also very challenging, but you get to have thai food every night, and spend a few hours recuperating on the beach

    3. apalachian trail (or other treks) walk 8 hours a day. build a fire, sleep, repeat every day for months. very challenging

    4. the IDF base that teaches krav maga is also a sports college - called wingate. they have various camps that teach krav all day for 2 weeks, or several weeks. it is on the beach, but not the nice, hot chicks and umbrella drinks type of beach but the nasty, running on the beach and getting sand in everything while you puke type of beach. that may be the closest thing to what you are looking for.



    These are good suggestions especially #2,4. My objective was never to pretend I was an actual soldier. I had thought pretty hard about the USAF Reserves for a while and still might sign up. I'll have to research more about it. I think my biggest hesitation is being put in with standard ground troops when I'm highly trained in engineering.

    Is the Air National Guard too pussy?
     
  9. dl20

    dl20 Well-Known Member

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    This last year has been rough for me, believe it or not the only thing that kept me sane was my cat, no joke.

    Ok this you are going to have to explain

    dl
     
  10. Nonk

    Nonk Well-Known Member

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    I think my biggest hesitation is being put in with standard ground troops when I'm highly trained in engineering.

    Is the Air National Guard too pussy?


    Surely the various reserve formations must have some sort of specialist units where your civilian skills can be utilised. In the UK we rely heavily on our Reserves and the in many cases unique skills they bring from civvy life.
     
  11. globetrotter

    globetrotter Well-Known Member

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    These are good suggestions especially #2,4. My objective was never to pretend I was an actual soldier. I had thought pretty hard about the USAF Reserves for a while and still might sign up. I'll have to research more about it. I think my biggest hesitation is being put in with standard ground troops when I'm highly trained in engineering.

    Is the Air National Guard too pussy?


    don't worry about that, not everybody is sharp end. the benifits you gain from serving, from being part of a bigger organization, from putting your own ego aside to serve a group goal - these are things that you get whether you are an infantryman or a air controler. but you may be suprised, you might find something that you really enjoy.

    also, every infantry unit has an engineering team - I don't know exactly how it works in the US, but every IDF battalian has an engineering team, adn every brigade has an engineering company. that is a very cool job - when an army needs to move someplace they need to clear the roads, build bridges, etc. just an idea, but that might be an available option.
     
  12. rnoldh

    rnoldh Well-Known Member

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    Wow, this sounds like a lot of fun:[​IMG]

    (From the seal website)

    First Phase (Basic Conditioning)

    First Phase is nine weeks in length. Continued physical conditioning in the areas of running swimming, and calisthenics grow harder and harder as the weeks progress. Students will participate in weekly four mile timed runs in boots, timed obstacle courses, swim distances up to two miles wearing fins in the ocean, and learn small boat seamanship.

    The first five weeks of First Phase prepare you for the sixth week, better known as "Hell Week." During this week, students participate in five and one half days of continuous training, with a maximum of four hours of sleep. This week is designed as the ultimate test of one's physical and mental motivation while in First Phase. Hell Week proves to those who make it that the human body can do ten times the amount of work the average man thinks possible. During Hell Week, you will learn the value of coolheadedness, perseverance, and above all, TEAMWORK. The remaining three weeks are devoted to teaching various methods of conducting hydrographic surveys and how to conduct a hydrographic chart.


    Obviously not for everyone though.
     
  13. globetrotter

    globetrotter Well-Known Member

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    Wow, this sounds like a lot of fun:[​IMG]

    (From the seal website)

    First Phase (Basic Conditioning)

    First Phase is nine weeks in length. Continued physical conditioning in the areas of running swimming, and calisthenics grow harder and harder as the weeks progress. Students will participate in weekly four mile timed runs in boots, timed obstacle courses, swim distances up to two miles wearing fins in the ocean, and learn small boat seamanship.

    The first five weeks of First Phase prepare you for the sixth week, better known as "Hell Week." During this week, students participate in five and one half days of continuous training, with a maximum of four hours of sleep. This week is designed as the ultimate test of one's physical and mental motivation while in First Phase. Hell Week proves to those who make it that the human body can do ten times the amount of work the average man thinks possible. During Hell Week, you will learn the value of coolheadedness, perseverance, and above all, TEAMWORK. The remaining three weeks are devoted to teaching various methods of conducting hydrographic surveys and how to conduct a hydrographic chart.


    Obviously not for everyone though.





    but here is the thing - you get through this type of thing, and for the rest of your life you remembe that you achieved it. everything else is relativly easy.
     
  14. Violinist

    Violinist Well-Known Member

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    Join the foreign legion and be done with it.
     
  15. Manton

    Manton Well-Known Member

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    The SEALs, IIRC, have the highest washout rate of any SOF units in the US armed forces.
     
  16. Mblova

    Mblova Well-Known Member

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    ^^^^+1.

    The average class size for BUD/S starts out at around 60-80 and by the time hell weak rolls through they are down to about 30-40 and then once graduation rolls along anywhere from 15-20 graduate.
    Plus before BUD/S they have a new screener program that screens out people that they think are not even ready for BUD/S.
     
  17. globetrotter

    globetrotter Well-Known Member

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    Join the foreign legion and be done with it.

    FL is a combat organization - the vast majoirty of the units aren't as tough as a light infantry/special forces unit.
     
  18. globetrotter

    globetrotter Well-Known Member

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    The SEALs, IIRC, have the highest washout rate of any SOF units in the US armed forces.

    it is very hard to understand, no matter how athletic you are, how hard the training will be. in the IDF, there were about 7 light infantry units, and the seal equivelant was considered the hardest. the one I was in was considered about the 4rth hardest (or course, we liked to say we were third hardest, and some of the others liked to say we were 5th hardest, its not an exact science) . we had 125 applicants for every position with half of the people who started finishing training, I would say that the seals had significanlty more. so I can't talk for the level of difficulty of the seals, except that it was significantly harder than what I experienced.

    some guys broke down completly, even people who had done very well in civillian athletic challenges. its just not something that you know before hand how you will handle it.
     
  19. Nonk

    Nonk Well-Known Member

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    ^^^^+1.


    Plus before BUD/S they have a new screener program that screens out people that they think are not even ready for BUD/S.


    In the UK we have a similar system now for our combined Special Forces selection (SAS and SBS).

    There is a pre-selection to give candidates an idea of what to expect.

    A friend of mine passed that and the hills phase a year or two ago, only to fail on officers week, poor lad!

    Even then most go on to fail in the remainder of the selection, its unbelievably demanding.

    We have had a year in which not one candidate passed selection, (run twice yearly) although allegations of 'creeping excellence' abound.
     
  20. globetrotter

    globetrotter Well-Known Member

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    In the UK we have a similar system now for our combined Special Forces selection (SAS and SBS).

    There is a pre-selection to give candidates an idea of what to expect.

    A friend of mine passed that and the hills phase a year or two ago, only to fail on officers week, poor lad!

    Even then most go on to fail in the remainder of the selection, its unbelievably demanding.

    We have had a year in which not one candidate passed selection, (run twice yearly) although allegations of 'creeping excellence' abound.


    Nonk,

    in the UK the special forces are selected from seasoned troops, no? or do they feed from conscripts, as well?
     

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