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Microsoft Surface

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Douglas, Oct 22, 2012.

  1. Rambo

    Rambo Well-Known Member

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    Why?
     
  2. GQgeek

    GQgeek Well-Known Member

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    Control and security mostly. It runs windows 8 pro so you can join tham to an Active Directory domain and tightly control what can/can't be done on it, keep it updated and secure, implement network access control policies, etc. It ties in with all the management capabilities of the MS ecosystem which go far beyond wiping exchange accounts and requiring a password. It's got full device encryption which is essential to a lot of businesses (and government) for portable devices. Think about hospitals or anyone with sensitive information. There are strict compliance regulations that govern how you can access certain types of information and what controls must be in place to prevent that information being compromised.

    And the USB port is very important. Think payment terminals, diagnostic tools, handheld scanners, and lots of other crap. These peripherals will vary by industry but many have some devices they'd like to attach to their tablets.
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2012
  3. Jr Mouse

    Jr Mouse Well-Known Member

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    You just stated that the iPad and Surface RT are too heavy. At 1.44 pounds for the iPad 3 and 1.5 pounds for the RT, I agree. Not a day goes by that I dont wish my iPad 3 was lighter and I couldn't imagine it being comfortable in use if it weighed more. The Surface Pro is around 33% heavier. At 2 pounds it's not a "good enough" tablet replacement. The size, aspect ratio and weight indicate to me no one is going to use this device as a tablet and thus will still want to own a secondary device to use as such.

    The Surface Pro doesn't make a lot of sense in context of how MS is marketing the device and wants you to use it.
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2012
  4. GQgeek

    GQgeek Well-Known Member

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    I said it's they're too heavy for one-handed use for extended periods of time. Most people aren't using tablets one-handed and suspended in the air for 45 minutes though. I think that most use it in bed, on the couch, at a conference table, in their lap, etc. Most of the time, the bulk of the weight would be supported by something other than a hand. That's not to say I wouldn't love to see something like this a pound lighter but it's not going to happen for another 2-3 years so for now it's about choosing the right set of tradeoffs.
     
  5. Jr Mouse

    Jr Mouse Well-Known Member

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    A two pound tablet that gets 5 hours of battery life and costs a grand is not the right trade off this year or any year. This is not a compelling device as its been designed and marketed to be used.

    We can keep going in circles here, but unless you have a better arguement I am going to continue to disagree on this.
     
  6. Jr Mouse

    Jr Mouse Well-Known Member

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    There has also been a lot of talk about high levels of returns for the RT. if that's true, I wouldn't be surprised. MS has done a poor job of communicating what the RT is and the simple fact it can't run legacy apps. I kind of like the RT and all this disappoints me as I would like to see the platform take off. Hopefully these rumors are FUD.

    I came to a realization last night on how MS could have handled RT and Wimdows 8 differently and avoided much of the critical reception they have received. I'll try and share it later as I am curious what everyone's thoughs would be on it.
     
  7. Rambo

    Rambo Well-Known Member

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    was this before or after the third glass of wine?
     
  8. Jr Mouse

    Jr Mouse Well-Known Member

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    Before, but the wine helped me flesh it out.
     
  9. GQgeek

    GQgeek Well-Known Member

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    People get lazy in blog posts and have been calling it the Surface RT, but they're actually called Surface with Windows RT and Surface with Windows Pro. Do you think that's a clear enough distinction? I suppose I'm not a regular consumer, but can probably can guess at what Windows 8 is but if they've got any brains at all, wouldn't they be prompted to question what Windows RT was and a) ask a sales rep for details or b) google it? It would then be immediately clear which did what.

    I'm not sure if MS is deliberately trying to blur the line and it'll end up costing them. I really think that on their product comparison page they need to be explicit that the Surface with Windows 8 Pro runs all your old windows programs but that the RT only runs Metro style apps. I've always thought calling it RT was stupid. It's a meaningless name to anyone that's not a developer and the easiest way to convey what it was would have been through its name.
     
    1 person likes this.
  10. Dbear

    Dbear Well-Known Member

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    What does RT stand for? Real time?
     
  11. GQgeek

    GQgeek Well-Known Member

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    No, Runtime. It's basically an API. All of the new Metro-styled apps must use it. So yeah, it's a stupid name for a consumer OS.
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2012
  12. Dbear

    Dbear Well-Known Member

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    Surface and Surface Pro would have been fine...lol
     
  13. Jr Mouse

    Jr Mouse Well-Known Member

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    Here's a crazy idea. Don't call them both Surface. That indicates they are the same products with the Pro version being an upgrade. That's not the case at all.

    I find it incredible they thought this was smart product branding.
     
  14. Dbear

    Dbear Well-Known Member

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    That's not the case? Well, then, marketing fail.
     
  15. Jr Mouse

    Jr Mouse Well-Known Member

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    RT is not a computer like Pro is, but a mobile computing device like the iPad or Galaxy 7. The version of Windows that has been coded for RT is limited and runs on completely different hardware architecture. Pro and RT are not fully software compatible and are running different operating systems even if they look the same on the surface (yup that's a pun!).

    Paul Thurrott who has basically built a career out of writing about Windows and MS' products has a nice write up about this and why it's such a huge problem. It's no one's fault by MS' own. http://winsupersite.com/article/windows8/windows-rt-redmond-problem-144554
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2012
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  16. Dbear

    Dbear Well-Known Member

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    Gotcha, it just seems like the more time it takes to explain the differences, the larger the chance you have just lost the consumer.
     
  17. dah328

    dah328 Well-Known Member

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    I think you mean the Nexus 7. In either case, that article is pretty helpful in its discussion of what software will and will not be initially available on both devices, but his assertion that you restated above that the Surface RT is not a computer like the Surface Pro is overly simplistic and wrong. In any meaningful sense of the word, the Surface RT is a computer. It just does not run the same version of Windows that the Surface Pro does. Obviously, that limits the number of apps that it can run, but that does not make it something less than a "computer" any more than a Linux desktop's inability to run Outlook makes it less than a computer. From the perspective of hardware or intrinsic device capability, there is nothing that prevents Outlook or any other Windows app from being ported in the future to Windows RT. They are simply devices targeted to different kinds of end users, though confused by Microsoft's typical marketing ineptitude.
     
  18. Jr Mouse

    Jr Mouse Well-Known Member

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    Yes I meant the Nexus 7 of course.

    We as a society have decided to classify mobile computing devices like the iPad differently then we do desktops and laptops. Under a broad definition the iPad and most smartphones are also computers, but it's helpful to have these sub categories. The point being made is that the Surface RT falls under the same sub category that the iPad does. For the sake of clarity and to prevent confusion, these different classifications are used even if all these devices are "computers" at the end of the day.
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2012
  19. GQgeek

    GQgeek Well-Known Member

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    I think Surface is a great name, so I can totally understand why they wanted to use it for both but they need to be more explicit about which does what. I think that they are being deliberately vague about the fact that the RT doesn't run x86 code and that's not helping them. Even with a different name though, the problem is that they look the same, both physically and at the OS level. And the fact that they do look/work the same (aside from the incompatability with all x86 apps on the RT), is actually a big plus. But explaining the difference to consumers is not an easy problem to solve. Maybe they will be more willing to illustrate the differences when the pro is actually available? It's hard to say... I think both should have been launched at the same time. Having said that, we're a month in and this is version 1 of the product. By the time version 2 comes out there will be a ton of apps and hopefully they'll have figured out their message.
     

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