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MEGA PEACOAT THREAD - 61 threads merged - all Peacoat questions HERE

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by ruzzi, Mar 30, 2006.

  1. koneenrauniot

    koneenrauniot New Member

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    Nov 1, 2016
    Why doesn't anyone make kersey pea coats anymore? Is the cloth available somewhere if one wants a bespoke coat?
     
  2. Peacoat

    Peacoat Well-Known Member

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    The demand has to be there for a manufacturer to offer it. As the Navy no longer uses Kersey (to save money), there just isn't much demand for it. It has fallen by the wayside. Go vintage. There is plenty of Kersey there.
     
  3. 7_rocket

    7_rocket Well-Known Member

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    Anyone?
     
  4. ChronBong

    ChronBong Well-Known Member

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    I dont, I have a dark navy blue peacoat with a dark grey beanie.
     
  5. Peacoat

    Peacoat Well-Known Member

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    My peacoats are all vintage midnight blue, and my beanies are all navy blue or dark grey.
     
  6. 7_rocket

    7_rocket Well-Known Member

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  7. jesselostweight

    jesselostweight Member

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    Hi there!

    First post! I've been pouring over this thread in hopes of finding answers, but to no avail. It seems that most men in here are a much different shape than I am. I recently lost weight (from 265-213) and I am 6ft tall. I've been as low as 180 when I was younger, wkth next to no fat and a very broad chest and shoulders. I currently can wear a 44 jacket - though it juuuuust fits (no pulling but no room to gain weight). I wear a 35 pants. But that obviously doesn't mean my weight is a 35. I have a tummy. For anyone knowledgeable wth sizing, 44 is the very end of most large sizes. After that, XL is 46 and fits me poorly.

    I went to banana republic and got their large Peacoat. It pulled way too much. I was standing in a fabric box for the XL and the sleeves were too long. Next I went to j crew. The dock Peacoat L fit but just felt a bit smothering/restrictive and was a bit too stiff for me. Next, I received the lands end Peacoat, in size large. It was very flimsy and way too much under the arms and upper chest - which is difficult to do on me!

    So I'm right where I started! After reading this thread, I thought I'd try the bayswater, but since it would be purchased on eBay, I can't return it. It seemed that one person measured it and that there was an extra inch in the bay vs the dock but I didn't see any verification. Do they fit the same? Any extra room in the bayswater? Same fabric? I then moved on to schott. I saw that some of their jackets are numerical sizing (44). Would I order a 44? It isn't slim fit - does that mean it'll be boxy? Would a slim fit even fit me? As usual, the slim fit large goes to 44 and XL is 46 as opposed to the numerical sizing of the traditional schott 740. Is that 32oz going to feel super thick and restrictive as well?

    I really want to avoid a tailor and keep costs down.

    I don't need the thickest material. The dock was SO thick - granted trying it out in a hot mall wasn't a good idea. Are there other measurements that I could take to give people an idea of my build?
     
  8. jesselostweight

    jesselostweight Member

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    And just like that, I see a guy in eBay selling a slim large schott and he says it fits perfect (he's wears a 40 suit coat). Guess that means a large wouldn't work for me, measurements be damned!
     
  9. Peacoat

    Peacoat Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Middle Tennessee
    With a non standard body shape, you will have problems finding a peacoat (or other fitted coat/jacket) that is a good fit for you. Perhaps the below text will help you find a fit.

    Peacoats are designed to be trim fitting garments for the military physique. I have found the tag size on vintage issue peacoats is usually an accurate predictor of how the garment will fit. There are exceptions, however, and I have written this to help obtain a good fit for a peacoat bought from an online vendor, such as Ebay.

    A properly fitted peacoat will be trim without being tight. There will be enough room to wear a sweater underneath without binding. A sweater may be necessary to fill in the space between the body and the inside of the coat for really cold weather wear. It slows the flow of cold air and adds insulation. For example, my chest measures 42 inches. I wear a size 42 peacoat (pit to pit of 22.25 inches) and have enough room underneath for a sweater. For a trimmer look I can also wear a size 40 peacoat (pit to pit of 21.25 inches), but the fit is a little tighter, and there is no room for a sweater under the coat. With the fit being closer to the body, however, the size 40 is warmer than the size 42 worn without a sweater.

    I have found that the earlier the peacoat, the tighter the fit. For example, my size 42 WWII peacoat fits about 3/4 of an inch smaller in the chest than the post war models. The coats after WWII have a little more room in the chest. In fact the WWII models have a trimmer fit overall--chest, sleeves and shoulders--than the post war coats. It isn't a major difference, but it is something to be aware of if considering a WWII peacoat.

    The first step in determing proper peacoat fit is to obtain your bare chest measurement. For an accurate chest measurement, stand in front of a mirror so that your side is facing the mirror. Take a cloth tape measure and measure at the widest part of your bare chest (or wearing just a tight T-shirt). Make sure the tape is level from front to rear (this is the reason for the mirror). Do not take a deep breath and do not exhale deeply--just normal breathing will do it. You may hold your breath for a few seconds while measuring. Relax your position and do this three times. All of the slack should be out of the tape, but it should not be pulled so tight as to indent the skin. Take the best measurement--one that is the same as at least one other measurement. Or, failing a reproduced number, take the middle number.

    It is best to use a cloth tape measure as this reduces the error inherent in taking measurements. Cloth tape measures are available online, at fabric stores and probably in the fabric section of stores such as Target and Kmart. You could use a piece of string and a yard stick, but that induces error in the measurements, and the string is stretchy--even more error. We need to be as accurate as possible in our measurements.

    When I want a pit to pit measurement of the peacoat, I ask the seller to lay the coat face up on a flat surface, such as a bed. Stretch it tightly from side to side and pull the same amount of material evenly from the front and the back. Do not be concerned about any seams--disregard the seams. We want the amount of material stretched in the back to be the same as the amount stretched in the front. Then let the fabric relax and take the measurement. It should be a whole number and a fraction--such as 19.25 inches. Do not round off; we want the entire number. Try to be accurate to 1/8 of an inch. This pit to pit measurement tells us how the coat will fit in the chest, and if the stated chest size on the tag is accurate.

    To find the actual size of a peacoat in the absence of a tag, or to check the accuracy of the tag, take the number as determined above. Disregard the fraction and multiply the whole number by 2. Then subtract 2 inches from the result. This (subtracting the 2 inches) will give the actual chest size of the garment, even though the measurement is taken from the outside. It does not give the interior measurement, but only the chest size of the peacoat. As an example, I would expect a size 44 peacoat to measure a little over 23 inches across the chest--say 23 1/4 inches. Disregard the 1/4 inch and multiply the 23 by 2 = 46. Then subtract 2 inches, which gives a true size of 44. This method is helpful when there is no tag on the coat, or no chest size is stated on the tag. Keep in mind it doesn't give us an interior measurement of the coat, but only an accurate tag size of the coat, whether the original tag is present or not. In WWII models, the pit to pit number may be whole number without a fraction as they were built a little more fitted than the post war coats.

    US Navy peacoats have become larger in relation to their stated tag size over the years. The WWII models fit the snuggest. Then the vintage models get a little larger. The vintage years are from 1946 through 1979. I have found that the 1979 coats are a bit larger than the coats from late 1940s. And the current issue coats have become a little more generous in sizing than the vintage coats. The current issue years are 1980 through the current production models.

    Even though trim fitting, there is a lot of leeway in the sizing of peacoats. Even if one has lost the athletic build of youth, the coat will probably fit if the proper chest size is obtained. Of course if the measurement around the abdomen is a great deal larger than around the chest, a peacoat may not be the best choice. Keep in mind also that peacoats are, as are all garments, built for a standard body style. The closer one's body style is to the standard, the better the fit. The farther from standard, the more difficult it is to obtain a proper fit.

    For the full guide on peacoat dating see the link below:

    http://www.thefedoralounge.com/thre...-dating-the-united-states-navy-peacoat.72058/
     
  10. jesselostweight

    jesselostweight Member

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    Thanks for the info, though I'm not sure I communicated this correctly. I wear a Large shirt in BR and it fits perfectly. I don't think those are for odd shaped people. For starters, I had no idea that a 44R wasn't for a 44 inch chest - but rather a 46 inch chest. So I definitely have a 45.5 inch chest, NOT 44. The lands end measures at a 50 inch for the Large. I guess that explains why I was swimming in it. It also puts me in between a lot of sizes. A 46 inch chest will leave me barely any room (clearly not enough). My stomach isn't the problem (it's not huge). I figure a 46 inch chest (I can feel my ribs on my side) and a 38 inch waist (size 36 pants) is where I'm at. I was under the impression that an 8 inch drop is an athletic cut. I'm just in between sizes.

    I called a few places... the dock peacoat is 48 inches for the Large. Hard to tell whether it just fit or it was just the stiffness of the material. I noticed the arms were snug (I lift when I can). I would guess a 49 inch wide (24.5 chest) would be perfect....but they don't make those, do they? :)
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2016
  11. Peacoat

    Peacoat Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Middle Tennessee
    
    You have lost me. A 44 should fit a size 44 chest, but there is a lot of variation in the sizes as stated by the manufacturers. With a measured chest size of 45.5 you should get a good fit with a size 44 (23.25 p2jp) or a size 46 (p2p of 24.25). The size 46 may be a little large on you.

    Instead of having the seller give you the stated size of the coat, try having them properly measure the coat and give you the p2p measurement. This measurement will give you 1/2 of the outer diameter of the coat. You will probably want a coat with a p2p of 23" to 24.25." The latter may be too large on you. If you have a peacoat at home that is too large or too small for you, measure the p2p so you will know which way you need to go.
     
  12. jesselostweight

    jesselostweight Member

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    Ah - the variation in manufacturers explains my confusion then. I'm a 45.5 but a 44R fits me perfectly. What I was trying to say is that I thought that if I wore a 44R, that meant my chest was 44 inches - so I was surprised to measure it and see that it was 45.5 inches, despite wearing a 44R. But you cleared that up. Is chest circumference the same as P2P doubled or is circumference inner measurement vs P2P outer measurement? I called Jcrew and they told me that the Dock peacoat had a 48 inch chest circumference and the Bayswater had a 49. However, Bayswater had a 45.5 waist vs a 47 waist for Dock. I'm wondering if that extra inch that the Bayswater gives in the chest, with everything else minus the waist being equal, will be the difference in fit for me.
     
  13. Peacoat

    Peacoat Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Middle Tennessee
    
    P2P is merely the measurement of 1/2 of the outer diameter of the coat. When we know how a coat with a certain p2p will fit, we can use that as a guide in buying coats online without having to rely on the stated size as given by the manufacturer. In an earlier post I told you what p2p should give you a good fit. I think I said 23.25." Rely on that in narrowing your search.

    You also need to know that coats made of fabrics of different thicknesses (peacoats vs. leather coats, for example) will have different p2p measurements for a good fit. But for now you are looking for a peacoat.
     
  14. jesselostweight

    jesselostweight Member

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    Thank you again!!

    Someone on eBay said the bayswater is 24 p2p, but that would mean 48 inch chest and J crew states 49. The fabric being as thick as it was on the dock coat, I assume is what made it tough to move around in. But if they're both 24 p2p, then who knows.

    I'll be on the hunt. :)
     
  15. Peacoat

    Peacoat Well-Known Member

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    A p2p of 24", if measured correctly, would fit like a size 46, not a size 48 or 49.
     
  16. jesselostweight

    jesselostweight Member

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    But when they said the actual circumference is 49 inches, empirically (as opposed to the garment size), shouldn't the p2p be half of that? JCrew said there was a "team of ladies" that measure it with a tape measure to make sure it's accurate...I kid you not! So how 49 inches around would yield a p2p of 23 or 23.5 is a bit odd.
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2016
  17. Peacoat

    Peacoat Well-Known Member

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    Nov 26, 2009
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    Middle Tennessee
    Yes, the p2p should be 24.5 (if 49" is the outside measurement) which gives 46 as the actual size of the coat, irrespective of what they say the size is. If the wool shell is as thick as the wool used in the vintage US Navy peacoats, that coat will fit someone with an actual chest size of 46 fairly loosely, and with a chest size of 48 fairly closely.
     
  18. jesselostweight

    jesselostweight Member

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    So the ebayer probably didn't know how to measure the p2p, more than the size being off from what Jcrew quoted me?
     
  19. Neognosis

    Neognosis Well-Known Member

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    Aug 23, 2013
    [​IMG]


    I bought his schott peacoat almost a year ago, after much debate.

    My only regret is that I waited so long. It is fantastic and warm with just a shirt underneath down to the low 40's.
     
  20. DrYou

    DrYou Member

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    Dec 16, 2016
    First post, looking for advice, opinions. I've been looking for a Peacoat for a couple months now. I'm 6'2 240lbs, normally wear a 48R blazer. I ended up getting an L.L. Bean "Authentic Wool Pea Coat" made by "Sterlingwear", 80% wool, Oxford Grey. I preferred (only slightly) something not black or super dark navy blue as I have a blonde dog and I like the contrast of the a lighter color with dark jeans. "Regularly" $259, it was on sale for $199.99, I bought a 20% off coupon on eBay for $2, they also had a promo where you got a $10 gift card if you spent $100, after I placed my order I chatted with customer service and had them apply the gift card to my order. So all said and done I got the brand new Sterlingwear coat for $151.20, since it came from L.L Bean it's also backed by their 100% Guaranteed which I liked.

    I do like the coat, feels solid and good quality. I normally wear an XL in shirt, but I ordered the large which seems spot on, sleeves may be a hair too short, has a decent amount of room inside still, but I know a medium wouldn't fit. The one thing that bugs me is the padding in the shoulders. I own a few blazers that I like to wear with jeans, but I never grab the ones with shoulder padding cause I don't think it looks right on me, at least with a dressed down jean look. Not sure what it is, my shoulders, my large head? I guess I'm wondering if this coat really does fit well and if I'm just being self conscious about the shoulders? I'm tempted to return it and start the search again, this time looking only for Peacoats with no shoulder padding. When it comes to that path I'm having difficulty knowing which high quality ones have no padding as it's hard to tell from pictures.

    Thoughts?

    For context, the shirt I'm wearing is an XL Tall white oxford from Old Navy, so slightly longer in sleeves and torso. Coat covers torso, shirt does stick out of the sleeve, anywhere from nothing to 2 inches depending how my arm is positioned. iPhone is in the pictures cause I'm using it to trigger my camera. =)
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2016

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