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lefty's random dog thread.

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by lefty, Mar 22, 2009.

  1. lefty

    lefty Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't say the mixed breeds are any less tractable than a purebred working breed (as any circus performing dogs will attest), but obviously you have greater odds of finding a decent animal in an established line of working dogs. This is an interesting video of high jumping Malinois in China. The athleticism of these dogs is amazing.
    IMPORTANT NOTICE: No media files are hosted on these forums. By clicking the link below you agree to view content from an external website. We can not be held responsible for the suitability or legality of this material. If the video does not play, wait a minute or try again later. I AGREE

    TIP: to embed Youtube clips, put only the encoded part of the Youtube URL, e.g. eBGIQ7ZuuiU between the tags. And speaking of canine athletes, this is Faith. [​IMG] Three-legged dogs can get on quite well, especially if the dog retains his front legs as they bear the majority of his weight and the rear legs are mostly used for locomotion. But a dog with no front legs? My gut reaction as a dog guy would be to cull the puppy. When people ask my advice about when to put their dogs down I rely on an old dogman saying ... you put a dog down when there's still something left of him other than his wounds. But if a puppy doesn't know he's wounded ... http://www.faiththedog.net/videos/CoolDog.wmv lefty
     
  2. nootje

    nootje Well-Known Member

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    quite amazing to see that, and it does make me smile.. allthough the dogs spine and hips should get into problems with that posture, but I guess as long as the dog is still having a good life..
     
  3. lefty

    lefty Well-Known Member

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    quite amazing to see that, and it does make me smile.. allthough the dogs spine and hips should get into problems with that posture, but I guess as long as the dog is still having a good life..

    I'm a little surprised he's lasted for seven years without rupturing his ACL.

    Hell of a thing,

    Then there's this ... no dog left behind:

    IMPORTANT NOTICE: No media files are hosted on these forums. By clicking the link below you agree to view content from an external website. We can not be held responsible for the suitability or legality of this material. If the video does not play, wait a minute or try again later. I AGREE

    TIP: to embed Youtube clips, put only the encoded part of the Youtube URL, e.g. eBGIQ7ZuuiU between the tags.

    lefty
     
  4. Chiaroscuro

    Chiaroscuro Well-Known Member

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    She had been returned to her breeder because she had killed and partly eaten the neighbor's 100-pound Akita. I think the Akita must really have pushed her because she was pleasant and gentle, maybe even a bit shy, around other dogs she encountered with me.

    [​IMG] I am a fan of Akitas, and am looking forward to owning one. I know Akitas can be dog aggressive but they usually have a respect for dogs of equal or larger size.

    [​IMG] I've heard of the Hyenas appetite as well, it is a monstrous thing. I wonder exactly how much it would cost to feed one a day.

    I remember the first time I saw the Belgian Malinois vid. My jaw literally dropped. It is a truly deceptive dog. When they do pair work its even more amazing.
     
  5. lefty

    lefty Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG] I am a fan of Akitas, and am looking forward to owning one. I know Akitas can be dog aggressive but they usually have a respect for dogs of equal or larger size.

    The Akita is a beautiful dog. While they did have their day in the fighting rings of Japan, I don't think I would consider them any more dog aggressive than any other breed in that males will posture and fight but it should be easy enough to control.

    Another breed that has been screwed up by show breeders:

    "On June 1, 1999, the FCI decided to divide the Akita into two separate "breeds" worldwide . One breed is the Japanese Akita. The other breed has been named the "Great Japanese Dog" or "GJD". The GJD consists of Akitas originally exported after WWII whose features were grossly altered by European and American breeding. The Akita standard set by the Japanese Akiho breeders has largely been ignored in the USA. The AKC (American Kennel Club) worsened the situation by refusing to register imported Japanese Akitas beginning in the seventies. This left a small gene pool of nonstandard Akitas from which the present day Akita in the USA has been inbred. "

    Japanese Akita:

    [​IMG]

    US Akita:

    [​IMG]

    Here is a damning BBC documentary of the state of the purebred dog in the UK:

    http://vids.myspace.com/index.cfm?fu...deoid=44215931

    It's flawed and I disagree with some of the points but the premise is bang on - when you breed for ridiculous physical traits such as skulls that are too small to hold a dog's brains, don't be too surprised when neurological problems arise.

    lefty
     
  6. JLibourel

    JLibourel Well-Known Member

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    Regarding the disparity between the more gracile Japanese Akita and the bulkier American version of the breed, I have heard the story that that some Japanese tried mixing Akitas with Tosas to improve the fighting qualities of the Akita while preserve an essentially Akita-like dog. As it turned out, the Akita-Tosa crosses were non-competitive with the Tosa in the octagon, and many of these Akita mixes were fobbed off on American servicemen who wanted Akitas, and that's why the American Akitas tend to have broader skulls, wrinkle, etc. As I recall, Semencic tells this story in one of his books.

    However, I can't help suspecting that the disparity is more the result of American show breeders' obsession with size and "bone." I have never understood this "bone" business. If the dog has an adequate skeletal structure without weakness or deformity, why does the line need more "bone"? I note that the breeders of ADBA performance dogs don't seem to worry any about "bone."
     
  7. lefty

    lefty Well-Known Member

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    I agree with you about this "bigger is better" obsession. It runs the other way in that some breeds lose size and substance and become too elegant. The US Boxer is a good example.

    We are our worst enemies when it comes to breed refinement.

    The Bulldog skull:

    [​IMG]

    My guess is that a modern Bulldog would be even more brachycephalic.

    GSD then and now:

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Basset Hound circa 1930 and now:

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    On the plus side there is a movement within the show world to move away from extreme unhealthy standards:

    "The classic British bulldog, a symbol of defiance and pugnacity, is to disappear. A shake-up of breeding standards by the Kennel Club has signalled the end of the dog's Churchillian jowl. Instead, the dog will have a shrunken face, a sunken nose, longer legs and a leaner body.

    The change has angered the British Bulldog Breed Council and it is threatening legal action against the club. Robin Searle, the chairman, said: "What you'll get is a completely different dog, not a British bulldog."

    New breeding standards for 209 dog species have been brought into immediate force after the furore over breeding practices shown on a BBC One documentary, Pedigree Dogs Exposed, last summer. Breeders have until the end of June to lodge any objections. "


    Article here.


    lefty
     
  8. centrix

    centrix Well-Known Member

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  9. lefty

    lefty Well-Known Member

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    on that note, any thoughts on the german shepherd dog?

    http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/images17...jak5months.jpg

    vs

    http://www.pioneergermanshepherds.com/greta.jpg

    notice the roach back of the current breed type?


    The first dog is a puppy, so it's hard to say what he will turn out to be, but with his roached back, over-angulated rear end and slanting croup he would be considered a cripple in any other breed.

    I don't like the other dog at all. While she has a better overall balance, the dog reminds me of the Shiloh Shepherds that were popular about 15 years ago. An attempt to resurrect the old GSD, they went too far and bred for over-sized dogs with a soft temperament. An big GSD with no fire is not a GSD no matter how lovely his conformation.

    lefty
     
  10. centrix

    centrix Well-Known Member

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    An big GSD with no fire is not a GSD no matter how lovely his conformation. lefty
    elaborate please i am seriously considering getting one
     
  11. crazyquik

    crazyquik Well-Known Member

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    elaborate please

    i am seriously considering getting one


    A lot (well, a significant minority) of GSDs are people-shy. And a people-shy GSD doesn't really have the temper of a GSD. I've had 3.
     
  12. lefty

    lefty Well-Known Member

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    A lot (well, a significant minority) of GSDs are people-shy. And a people-shy GSD doesn't really have the temper of a GSD. I've had 3.

    And a shy/sharp GSD can be a real liability.

    I don't know what your needs or expectations are, but the good news is that there is enough genetic diversity in the GSD to have a reasonable shot at acquiring the dog you want. The bad news is that you'll have to wade through hundreds and hundreds of animals to find him.

    What are you after in a dog? Where are you located?

    lefty
     
  13. centrix

    centrix Well-Known Member

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    actually not too sure, this is gonna be retarded but ill be migrating to new zealand in a few years time (hopefully). im hoping to find a nice apartment to live in, ill be looking for a small dog for that. but if i have to move into a landed property, i really want to get a german shepherd
     
  14. lefty

    lefty Well-Known Member

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    actually not too sure, this is gonna be retarded but ill be migrating to new zealand in a few years time (hopefully). im hoping to find a nice apartment to live in, ill be looking for a small dog for that. but if i have to move into a landed property, i really want to get a german shepherd

    Okay. There may be a quarantine law in NZ, so you have to consider that if you're bringing a dog

    However, if you like the GSD I would spend some time visiting breeders and Schutzhund events to get a better idea of what you realistically can expect and handle.

    If you are anywhere near Lansing MI, I would send you over to Cheryl Carlson who will give you the straight skinny on her dogs. They seem to be what you're after.

    lefty
     
  15. JLibourel

    JLibourel Well-Known Member

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    Aren't a lot of GSDs from Schutzhund/performance bloodlines way too much dog for most owners?

    I once helped place a shep that was just terrorizing the family that "owned" him, he was so dominant to them. Interestingly, when my friend, a burly former Marine DI, came to pick him up, the dog recognized a more dominant being and turned and ran! He was placed with a man who lived right on the Mexican border and wanted a property guardian to deter the illegals who had been crossing his land. However, he was eventually returned to the trainer because he would redirect and bite his owner when excited. When I met the dog, which was after that, he seemed fairly tractable to me.

    A lot of GSDs come across (to me, anyway) as hysterically aggressive. There was one that would just go insane with hysterical rage whenever my Tosa Dempsey and I passed her yard. One neighbor expressed a wish that Dempsey would kill the GSD, that dog was such a terror. However, Dempsey would totally ignore the GSD, much to my surprise. I later learned that she was a bitch, which explains Dempsey's indifference to her carryings-on.
     
  16. crazyquik

    crazyquik Well-Known Member

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    I've known several GSD trainers and they all agreed that it takes longer to train the owners than it does to train the dogs. I suppose that's true with most dog-owners though.

    They do (well, my 3 have) markedly respond(ed) differently to assertive vs. timid people.
     
  17. lefty

    lefty Well-Known Member

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    Aren't a lot of GSDs from Schutzhund/performance bloodlines way too much dog for most owners?

    .


    Yes.

    But it would be nearly impossible for the fellow to access a serious working GSD, so I'm not too concerned with potential problems. And I'd rather him go to a few protection events where dogs are working under control. Better that than meeting a pet breeder who tells him that his dogs are sweethearts and 11 months later the fellow has an out of control 95 lb. GSD with the potential to inflict real damage.

    Along those lines, this dog was sold a few times for being out of control until he landed in the hands of a decent trainer.

    http://www.metacafe.com/watch/983079..._jack_russell/

    crazyquick, where are your dogs from?

    lefty
     
  18. centrix

    centrix Well-Known Member

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    mmm i actually dont think id be interested in a puppy
     
  19. robin

    robin Well-Known Member

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    I think the history of the major GSD bloodlines is an interesting story in how it relates to Europe's history over the past 100 years.

    An interesting quote from von Stephanitz:

    "The shepherd dog is a working dog; he was born so, and only as such can he remain a 'shepherd dog'; the dog which we value and love. His abundance of joy in life must be used and he must be allowed to work even when kept by an amateur."
     
  20. romafan

    romafan Well-Known Member

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    I just passed two dog walkers outside. One was telling the other that a dachsund would be joining her group. She pronounced it dahsh-und. I've always heard it said dahx-und? [​IMG]

    Is this a to-may-toe vs. to-mah-toe type thing?
     

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