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lefty's random dog thread.

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by lefty, Mar 22, 2009.

  1. JLibourel

    JLibourel Well-Known Member

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    ^Interesting that the Bullmastiff/Fila cross was "as sweet as can be." I have found Filas to be very variable in temperament. I have seen some that were complete psychos, others that were very pleasant. A friend of mine had a Fila, and the first time I met the bitch, an adult at the time, within 20 minutes she was up on my lap playing kissy face with me--something my Tosas have never done with me and most certainly not with any stranger.

    A friend of mine had an accidental Rott-Fila litter. He drowned the puppies at birth. He said, "They might have been great dogs, but I just didn't care to find out." He had earlier made a deliberate breeding between his Pitt Bull and a Rottweiler. Those dogs were so high-dominance and potentially human aggressive that they were all destroyed between the ages of two and three. One of them killed his sire, the Pit Bull, in a fight (accidental, not a match). Another (or maybe it was the same dog) on meeting a stranger, sprang up, gently mouthed the man's throat, then sat down and smiled. He was saying, "I can kill you if I want to." Cross-breeding high-dominance, potentially aggressive dogs has always struck me as sort of like juggling nitroglycerine!
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2015
  2. NorCal

    NorCal Well-Known Member

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    yeah, I was a little surprised as well. What's more, I was petting the dog through a window in the back of a truck. She was not protective or aggressive at all.
     
  3. JLibourel

    JLibourel Well-Known Member

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    Sometime back I discussed the "American Bully" breed. Yesterday, for the first time, I encountered the "Pocket" or "Mini" version of the American Bully. It was not a bad looking little dog. However, some on-line photos of these dogs look much more exaggerated. They look as if their bellies were dragging on the ground! In any event, I am not sure what these dogs bring to the table that you couldn't get with a Staff Bull, especially since most Staff Bull breeders seem to be intent on breeding "bully type," with exaggerated heads and broad, squatty bodies.
     
  4. dcg

    dcg Well-Known Member

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    Thinking about adding a second dog in a few months when we move from my townhouse to a single family home on a bit over an acre. Fiancé would like a dog that doesn't shed much, is good with kids, and that'll run with her (the pit mix is scary fast but has never done well as a running companion at human speeds). I need something that doesn't bark/howl/whine much, as I work from home and am on calls most of the day. 50-80 pounds. Any suggestions? I'd be fine going the adoption route again but would prefer at least a young adult dog if we do so. Fiancé has her heart set on a puppy, and if we go that direction I may go breeder to hopefully get a better handle on eventual personality.
     
  5. lefty

    lefty Well-Known Member

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    ^^ They're pretty shitty looking dogs, Jan. Surprised you saw a good one.

    ^ How far does she run? Shedding is shedding; short single hair breed are just less noticeable.

    Any short-haired, medium-sized sporting, herding or working will do: Boxer, Vizsla, GSP, Aus Cattle Dog (double coat) or a mix that has the physical attributes you're after.

    How's your dog?

    lefty
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2015
  6. Find Finn

    Find Finn Well-Known Member

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    How about a collie, either a bearded or a border, the bearded doesn't shed much, but needs grooming.
     
  7. lefty

    lefty Well-Known Member

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    Border is a good dog, but a lot of work. Beardy is cool until you need to let him out in the rain and mud.

    Something unusual, short hair though a little aloof with stranger are the sighthounds - specifically the Basenji, Pharaoh and Ibizan.

    lefty
     
  8. Find Finn

    Find Finn Well-Known Member

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    I've had a bearded and have a Havanese now, so I know all about wet dog syndrom.

    The collies need a lot of work, but they are also very willing to work and are very intelligent.
     
  9. lefty

    lefty Well-Known Member

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    Nice dogs, but I think the ACD gives him tractability AND a little bad assery. That double coat will blow once a year though.

    Ask Matt, his dog gave him so much cred he had to leave SF.

    lefty
     
  10. Find Finn

    Find Finn Well-Known Member

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    I don't know about that a bearded on a windy day is pretty damn bad ass.
     
  11. dcg

    dcg Well-Known Member

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    Dog's doing well, thanks for asking. She just turned 7. Has calmed down a bit but still has her moments :)

    Runs probably in the 3 mile range. I'm personally not to worried about the shedding, but do want to avoid breeds that would blow their coat a couple times per year. Viszla was high on my list. Really like the idea of an ACD, but worry they might be too high energy. Need to balance her desire for a running partner with my need for some quiet and sanity during the work day. I don't want to get too attached to any one breed as much will depend on what's available in my area, but would like to come up with a few good options. Also not sure if I'm likely to have better luck adding an older dog or having a pup grow up with the current dog.

    For no reason in particular, I've just been reading up on schnauzers. Any thoughts (whether standard or giant)?
     
  12. dcg

    dcg Well-Known Member

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    Gaining approval for a long haired breed would be an uphill battle, and not one I'm all that interested in fighting. :) I like the Collies, but the impression I have is that the ACD would give me most of their benefits in (to me) a more interesting looking package with shorter hair. And if the longer hair were an option, I might lean Australian Shepherd. Happy to be corrected if that impression is inaccurate. Still worried they might be too much work.
     
  13. Find Finn

    Find Finn Well-Known Member

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    Border and Australian Shepard to me at least seem like they are very much a like in temper and training need. Their coats are also self cleaning, which is a plus and I wouldn't call them long haired, mid maybe.







    This is long hair.

    [​IMG]
     
  14. lefty

    lefty Well-Known Member

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    Vizslas are cool dogs and there is a wirehaired version that to my mind looks better. They also tend to have more substance that the short hair.

    [​IMG]

    A similar breed would be the WH GSP.

    [​IMG]

    These coats need to be stripped much like a terrier, but that allows you to control shedding to some extent. If you like these looks then consider the Airedale. This gives you size and toughness - something you may want to consider if your wife runs at night.

    [​IMG]

    I don't know a lot about Schnauzers other than the Giant will come with typical large dogs issues.

    [​IMG]

    Another good overall breed with size and athletic ability would be the Standard Poodle. Strong, smart, tractable and can have an easy care coat.

    [​IMG]

    Puppy or adult depends on so many things it's hard to say how it will turn out. Most dogs tend to be pretty tolerant of puppies though. If you go with an adult, the best way to introduce is outside on a long walk and on-lead training session. You want them to focus on you and understand that they can work alongside the other do without the world coming to an end. Short on-lead play sessions with each other can be tolerated as long as you break back to work. Tired dogs are calm dogs.

    You'll be fine.

    lefty
     
  15. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Well-Known Member

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    Norbert acquired a brother. A kelpie who is now 5 months old. He is awesome, but wow. He is already working sheep, having a great time with it.
     
  16. lefty

    lefty Well-Known Member

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    I know little about them other than this which is pretty cool:

    [​IMG]

    Did you buy some sheep?

    lefty
     
  17. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Well-Known Member

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    They basically work like border collies. More stamina and tougher, but less intense about non sheep things. More naturally social. Not golden retrievers, but they had to work huge sheep sales and shearings, so they culled dogs that were not generally social. They are basically the same breeding stock as bcs, but the farm collies who went to Australia from Scotland. They just selected for different traits. Also, there really only are working lines, so no weird sport dogs or show lines.
     
  18. djblisk

    djblisk Well-Known Member

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    Any advice on my 10 month old rescue pooch. Started limping in july from her front left leg, xrays were negative. Vet put her on ant-inflammtories and 2 weeks rest. She was fine. About 1.5 ago, started limping again. The vet didn't take xrays this time because she did not exhibit any pain when they test her legs. Now she is on 3 weeks rest and anti-inflammatories.

    The dang dog still has a limp after a week of rest! I think its a muscle or tendon strain but for a 10 month old? Shouldn't it be healing faster?

    Alas, I'm probably going to take her to an Ortho Vet in the bay area (if anyone knows of a good vet, let me know).
     
  19. lefty

    lefty Well-Known Member

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    If your vet has ruled everything else out then time is all you've got to work with. Her exercise sessions should be on lead only with a lot of crate time inside. Have patience.

    lefty
     
  20. dcg

    dcg Well-Known Member

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    All, thanks for the advice. Sorry I haven't replied sooner; was traveling all week for work with a hectic schedule.

    German Shorthaired Pointer seems to have a lot in common with the Vizsla. I like them both, and their wirehaired varieties. Also still interested in the ACD.

    I'm very much a fan of Airedales and am liking the Giant Schnauzers, but the fiancee not so much, sad to say. I like the Australian Shepherd as well, but she's pretty set on something with short hair.

    Lefty, I'm aware that the poodle is a fine breed, but they just don't do it for me.

    Will have to try to get some time with the above breeds over the next few months.
     

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