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Kitchen Knives

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Manton, Sep 15, 2007.

  1. indesertum

    indesertum Well-Known Member

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    can anybody chime in for tojiro? i've been wanting a good value chef's knife or a santoku
     
  2. Thomas

    Thomas Well-Known Member

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    can anybody chime in for tojiro? i've been wanting a good value chef's knife or a santoku

    I've heard positive things about Tojiro, but I opted for Togiharo which (according to the folks at Korin) has a larger handle and better fit & finish, for nearly the same price.
     
  3. ama

    ama Well-Known Member

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    I started with a Togiharo. Great knife for the $.
     
  4. Kd88

    Kd88 Well-Known Member

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    Shun Classics are the way to go. The Ken Onion and Kaji line are overpriced.

    If anyone lives in the Sacramento area I get a pretty big discount on knives, just pm me.
     
  5. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Well-Known Member

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    Just spent about 30 minutes cutting stuff up for dinner with my new south paw Shun santoku. Wonderful knife, I'm probably going to go back to the store to get the chef's knife now too.
    Plz get a couple good stones and a ceramic honing steel if you've already got a good Japanese blade. Nothing will fuck up your beautiful edge more than a shitty metal steel.
    Shun Classics are the way to go. The Ken Onion and Kaji line are overpriced.

    If anyone lives in the Sacramento area I get a pretty big discount on knives, just pm me.


    The Elite line is better than the Classic, by enough to compensate for the price. Not only aesthetically, but in the quality of the steel and the ability to hold an edge. I agree that the Ken Onion are bad, and gimmicky at that.
     
  6. indesertum

    indesertum Well-Known Member

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    which togiharus do you have?

    i've heard a lot about togiharu moly cores, but i've also heard that tojiros are much less maintenance. i try not to be, but i do get a bit lazy sometimes and leave the knife out overnite especially if i'm in a hurry.

    maybe i should just get togiharu and be more careful?
     
  7. Manton

    Manton Well-Known Member

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    Kwilk, how does it work in your restaurant? Does everyone bring their own knives? All their own tools, or just knives? Not even knives?

    If knives, do they bring the good stuff, or do they use "beaters"?
     
  8. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Well-Known Member

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    Kwilk, how does it work in your restaurant? Does everyone bring their own knives? All their own tools, or just knives? Not even knives?

    If knives, do they bring the good stuff, or do they use "beaters"?


    Everybody brings their own knives and steels, but nothing else. Sharpening stones and all other tools can be found in the restaurant somewhere.
    We all bring our good stuff, and don't you fucking DARE touch someone else's knife without their explicit permission. That's no joke. There is no faster way to become the kitchen bitch than to grab someone's knife without permission.
    They all definitely bring some good stuff. My knife is the smalltimer of the kitchen, which honestly blows my fucking mind. I [​IMG] it though. It makes me happy to work with.
     
  9. Manton

    Manton Well-Known Member

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    What are these people using?
     
  10. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Well-Known Member

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    What are these people using?

    Almost solely Japanese steel, usually handmade. Most of them are non-brand names and are handmade to order by a few different Japanese companies. All I know is that if you want a knife, talk to our special knife Chef with the hookups and he'll get you something incredible for a few hundred bucks.
     
  11. GrillinFool

    GrillinFool Well-Known Member

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    I can't wait till someone buys the two Shuns my fiancee and I registered for - 10 inch chef and 9 in slicer. I keep checking on Williams Sonoma in hopes these are the first items to be bought.

    The associate who helped us mentioned you can send back Shun knives to the distributor and they will sharpen them for free, you jsut have to pay for shipping.

    Looks like I will just have to wait until next April until our wedding, and in the meantime use our Henckels. We just had these handsharpened at Stoddard's so they are having a bit of a renaissance in our kitchen.


    The wife and I registered at WS just for the knives basically. Bed Bath and Beyond carried them but I couldn't play with them. And I like to play with new toys before I buy them. I went to WS to use the three big names and liked the Shuns the best. I got the 7 inch Santoku as an engagement party gift, the 8 inch Chef and the paring knife for wedding gifts and the 6 inch utility and 6 inch tomato (identical knives but one is serated).

    I also got the whet stone to sharpen them which I do about twice a year...
     
  12. Invicta

    Invicta Well-Known Member

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    Dec 16, 2008
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    On High
    Shun Classics are the way to go. The Ken Onion and Kaji line are overpriced.

    The Elite line is better than the Classic, by enough to compensate for the price. Not only aesthetically, but in the quality of the steel and the ability to hold an edge. I agree that the Ken Onion are bad, and gimmicky at that.

    Personally, having owned the Classics and now owning the Ken Onion line, I vastly prefer the KOs. They hold an edge much longer than the Classics and the blades are aesthetically pleasing to mine eye. While I can't really refute the "gimmiky" portion of your statement, the idea that the knives themselves are "bad" is laughably wrong. Probably because I am an Amature (note the capital "A"), but I find the handle of the Ken Onions much easier on my hands, especially on long jobs, say a 10lb. sack of potatoes. YMMV, but if you can get a deep discount on them (They ARE overpriced[​IMG]) I heartily reccomend them.
     
  13. Thomas

    Thomas Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    29,119
    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2006
    Location:
    Texas
    which togiharus do you have?

    i've heard a lot about togiharu moly cores, but i've also heard that tojiros are much less maintenance. i try not to be, but i do get a bit lazy sometimes and leave the knife out overnite especially if i'm in a hurry.

    maybe i should just get togiharu and be more careful?


    I have the Togiharu moly and find it quite easy to deal with. Then again, I've made it a point to wash every knife as I finish its task, before I move on to something else.
     
  14. Thomas

    Thomas Well-Known Member

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    Texas
    (...)

    They all definitely bring some good stuff. My knife is the smalltimer of the kitchen, which honestly blows my fucking mind. I [​IMG] it though. It makes me happy to work with.


    On one level it blows my mind as well. On another level...it still blows my mind. But, knowing what I now know about custom knife-smiths...I'd imagine it worth the expense to get something exactly as you want it - handle, blade width, hardness, bevel, weight, balance, etc.
     
  15. Douglas

    Douglas Well-Known Member

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    OK, I read this whole thread, and like many things on SF I am now not only more confused than when I started, and many questions remain unanswered, but worst of all I feel like shit about what I currently own. [​IMG] Here's my question - I always thought the Japanese knives were meant to be used differently than Western knives, i.e. Westerners are supposed to cut with a push stroke, and the Japanese knives are designed to cut on the pull - much like western vs. Japanese saw blades, and that the different sharpening angle (~30 degrees on a western vs. ~20 degrees on a Jap knife) was designed to accommodate this. Sounds like that may be a bunch of bunk. Also sounds like I'm not supposed to rock the blade? How else would I mince garlic or parsley or any other herb? I am suffering through with some Wusthofs that have served me well but could really use a sharpening - it's been a few years. I probably kill them when I hone them but it does seem to make a difference - I'm honing by hand and probably not at the perfect angle but it's definitely easier to cut after I've done so. I also can't imagine not having a full bolster, as I've become accustomed to using my thumb and forefinger to "pinch" the blade just on the business end of the bolster, and that really seems to help with precision and balance. Am I just an idiot? All you Michelin guys would likely think I'm a philistine if you saw my Julienne. I can see how less belly would be much better for slicing an onion, or julienne for example, or certainly for skinning a fish (impossible with my knife). I apparently suck [​IMG]
     
  16. Thomas

    Thomas Well-Known Member

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    ^^^ short reply...

    your Wusthofs are fine - just need to practice your freehand sharpening. Flatten your stone if it seems to have dished. I think there's a sharpening thread around here that should help you out.

    Japanese knives are wonderful, but the only one I use is a Gyotou, which is their version of the western Chef's knife. The rest are specialized and I wouldn't know where to start with them. Probably put an eye out or something.

    If you and your family/friends/guests like what you put on the plate - you don't suck.
     
  17. BP348

    BP348 Well-Known Member

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    I have a set of Wusthof I got on ebay. I really like them.
     
  18. Huntsman

    Huntsman Well-Known Member

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    Almost solely Japanese steel, usually handmade. Most of them are non-brand names and are handmade to order by a few different Japanese companies. All I know is that if you want a knife, talk to our special knife Chef with the hookups and he'll get you something incredible for a few hundred bucks.
    Awesome. I'd love to know if you know any of the makers....
     
  19. Rambo

    Rambo Well-Known Member

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    I'M IN MIAMI, BITCH
    I am suffering through with some Wusthofs that have served me well but could really use a sharpening - it's been a few years. I probably kill them when I hone them but it does seem to make a difference - I'm honing by hand and probably not at the perfect angle but it's definitely easier to cut after I've done so.
    Wusthof's are great knives. Sharpen them up and they'll be good as new. Like Thomas said, if the cooking is good, who gives a fuck what type of knife you use? I split time between a $30 Forschner and a $120 Global and I've found no difference except for the handle shape and weight.
     
  20. Dmax

    Dmax Well-Known Member

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    Personally, having owned the Classics and now owning the Ken Onion line, I vastly prefer the KOs. They hold an edge much longer than the Classics and the blades are aesthetically pleasing to mine eye.
    Do you own the standard Shun Ken Onion or the Shun Ken Onion Elite? The standard Ken Onion use the same steel as the Shun Classics (VG-10 @ RC59-61) so the edge retention should be identical, provided they are sharpened at the same angle. The Ken Onion Elite use SG2 steel @ (claimed) RC64 which should offer better edge retention than VG-10. SG2 is also used on the standard Shun Elite, the Shun Kaji, and the Shun Bob Kramer Meiji lines.
     

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