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Is my coworker right?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Quadcammer, Oct 18, 2012.

  1. MyOtherLife

    MyOtherLife Well-Known Member

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    +1
     
  2. GBR

    GBR Well-Known Member

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    If he is being compelled (however politely or loosely) to attend to entertain the company's outside guests then the company must pay. If it is PURELY an internal event with no outsiders then he should pay. However the issue them will be that attendance is deemed necessary to demonstrate loyalty: If that is so then the invitation policy is wrong.
     
  3. Singlemalt

    Singlemalt Active Member

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    This.

    Which I think is basically also your opinion, Quadcammer, no?
     
  4. TM79

    TM79 Well-Known Member

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    It will look very bad if he submits a form to be reimbursed for a fairly inexpensive tux rental. Snobby shops will look down their nose and blacklist you for such a thing. Whether or not it should be that way is another matter, and not that relevant ...
     
  5. aravenel

    aravenel Well-Known Member

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    This guy needs to just buy the tux. He took the position knowing that this kind of thing is a possibility. He should consider himself lucky that he is being asked to join such a high profile event for the firm, and that he will get to network with the types of folks that frequent those events. This is a good thing for his career.

    Does he try to expense his suits for work? I don't see this as being too different.
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2012
  6. dbhdnhdbh

    dbhdnhdbh Well-Known Member

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    Is he now expected not just to attend these events, but to become a visible contributor to charities? If he has been promoted to the point of representing the firm, is he really resisting the expense of the donations that would be far more than even the most expensive tux? At some point he has to decide how much he has to conform to advance his career. Sometimes conformity costs mo eg. He sounds more than bright enough to figure out his priorities.
     
  7. SamSpade

    SamSpade Well-Known Member

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    This is the fundamental issue. I personally find it infuriating that such intrusions in personal space (seriously, we're being told what to wear everywhere?? and a deviation instantly translates into judgement of character??) are not only accepted as normal, but also celebrated. I would not be surprised if he doesn't care about the money at all, it's just his little, sad, passive-agressive way to rebel. Better than just taking it up the ass, i suppose.
    Exhibit # 2,345,600 on the dictatorial nature of the workplace.
     
  8. aravenel

    aravenel Well-Known Member

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    If he has that much of a problem with it, he shouldn't be working on Wall Street. That's the nature of the beast, and he knew it going in. It was his decision.
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2012
  9. dbhdnhdbh

    dbhdnhdbh Well-Known Member

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    I don't have a moral objection to firms insisting that executives participate in charitable events, just trying to understand the situation.


    He might now be sufficiently senior that his conduct, including charitable activities, reflects on the firm. If so, and the firm takes these things seriously, then he will have to get with the program if he wants move up. Of course, if no one takes it seriously, and it is just a chance to go to a few parties, then perhaps no one cares. If they take the charities seriously, but not so much being seen there, then he may be able to make even larger donations- and get credit for that- without having to show up in a monkey suit. In any case, renting a tux sounds like a bad move. He can buy one for less than the rental price. I suspect no one rents particularly nice tuxedos, so he is probably going to appear in something fairly low brow either way. If the firm cares about that, then he may have to suck it up and come to event dressed as they expect. As others have pointed out, suits are not cheap either, and he wears them to work because he has to. This does not seem any different.

    And he should be grateful he is in a position to be able to give to charity, rather than having to rely on it.
     

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