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Is Gin or Vodka a gentleman's drink?

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Flame, Apr 14, 2006.

  1. chrysalid

    chrysalid Well-Known Member

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  2. Full Canvas

    Full Canvas Well-Known Member

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    I had people tell me Gin or Vodka with tonic are for ladies. Is there any truth in this?

    The 1960s cocktail for a student who was "soooo fisticated!" Nobody told me that martinis are implicitly gin.

    The SF James Bond fans may enjoy this. In 1969, as undergrad student, I was taking an extra-curricular course in wine tasting from Harold and Frances Torbert in La Jolla.

    Two of us (on the sly) were taken along by Dr. and Mrs. Torbert to a brunch garden party at the home of Theodore Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss. The home overlooks La Jolla from what was a hillside WWII watchtower location that scouted for Japanese submarines!

    From my reading of Ian Fleming's novels, I decided that one of Bond's vodka martinis would be just the ticket when a roving waiter asked for my drink order. I recited Bond's "shaken, not stirred" formula. The waiter rolled his eyes and sent me to the bar beneath a huge canopy alongside the house to go toe-to-toe with the bartender about my crazy request.

    The bartender saw a naive, underage student coming from twenty paces and decided to have some fun. When he asked "dry or extra-dry?", I confidently stated: "extra-dry!"

    Well, the bartender's way of making my martini "extra-dry" was to stir the vodka and ice before straining it into a proper glass. The vermouth? Extra-dry meant slowly passing the vermouth bottle between a strong light source (the afternoon's bright southern California sun) and the glass of chilled vodka poured for me only seconds before. He explained that a mere dry martini meant unscrewing the vermouth bottle cap two turns and shaking an actual drop of vermouth into the chilled vodka.

    I washed-down my green eggs and ham with an extra-dry stirred vodka martini! [​IMG]
    ________________________________
     
  3. tangerine

    tangerine Well-Known Member

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    If I were to draw gender lines based on alcoholic drink preferences, "girly drinks" would be ones with sweet ingredients; fruit juices (other than unsweetened citrus), liqueurs, etc.

    But, The Dude drinks White Russians, so I will not draw such lines.
     
  4. blackgrass

    blackgrass Well-Known Member

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    Finally! A martini is gin...period.
    I prefer mine stirred as opposed to shaken. I may be wrong but I think the myth about bruising the gin has more to do with breaking up the ice and creating little ice flakes that float in your martini. A martini should be crystal clear when served to you in a chilled glass....not a gin on crushed ice.
    Here are my steps to a perfect martini....
    1) start by chilling your glass
    2) fill shaker with ice
    3) add vermouth to the shaker and stir
    4) pour all the vermouth out of the shaker (this leaves the ice and shaker with just the right amout of vermouth in my opinion)
    5) add gin to the shaker
    6) add in a few drops of olive juice if you like it dirty
    7) stir
    8) dump ice from the martini glass and then strain the gin out of the shaker into the martini glass
    9) garnish with olive
    10) enjoy!

    That is my favorite martini....I'm sure everyone may do something a little differently but I can't order one at a bar and be happy with the drink I receive...maybe I'm a martini snob.
     
  5. Nantucket Red

    Nantucket Red Well-Known Member

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    "Bruising" means getting the gin full of ice flakes and air bubbles, which is what happens when you shake a martini. It's not a matter of myth but of terminology.
     
  6. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Well-Known Member

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    In my opinion, Vermouth is an important ingredient of the Martini. I think that the drying out of the Martini is a shame. I prefer mine 4 to 1.

    As I see it, there are two major reasons for the drying out that has happened since the golden age of the cocktail:

    1. People associate martinis with Vodka, and the botanicals in Vermouth work splendidly with Gin, but not so well with Vodka.

    2. People think it is manlier to go drier. That may be so, but it tastes shittier as well.
     
  7. LabelKing

    LabelKing Well-Known Member

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    What happened to the martini lunch?
     
  8. Martinis at 8

    Martinis at 8 Well-Known Member

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    What happened to the martini lunch?
    [​IMG] I have had a couple of those in New Orleans with a few clients. No one goes back to work after lunch.
     
  9. countdemoney

    countdemoney Well-Known Member

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    2. People think it is manlier to go drier. That may be so, but it tastes shittier as well.

    I really do adore gin, so for me, extra dry is extra better.

    One of my old profs often told the story of how, pre-aids and awareness of other diseases, he would take the vermouth, swirl it on the inside of the martini glass and then pour the vermouth back into the bottle.

    Personally, I prefer the swirl and discard or a wave of the vermouth bottle.
     
  10. horton

    horton Well-Known Member

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    I agree with Iammatt. If you think you like a dry martinin, try some different vermouth.

    I also think there's a big difference (both for vodka and gin) whether you stir the drink versus shaking it. Shaking really does "bruise" the gin, though I have no reason why this is the case. I like putting the alcohol in a shaker (or other holder) with a lot of ice and then stirring (e.g., with a chopstick) 2 or 3 times and that's it. The less time on/with the ice, the better.
     
  11. Morris

    Morris Well-Known Member

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    Gin is very classic and British. I wager the people who told you gin was for females were Americans, as I seem to notice they don't like gin much.

    Vodka is also classic although it tends to be Slavic in tradition.


    Bombay Saphire is the only gin (and frankly only non-single malt spirit) that will pass my lips.
     
  12. Nantucket Red

    Nantucket Red Well-Known Member

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    Bombay Saphire is the only gin (and frankly only non-single malt spirit) that will pass my lips.

    Try Hendricks gin and premier cru cognacs.
     
  13. saint

    saint Well-Known Member

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    Tanq 10 and Hendricks both make excellent martinis. I have to agree with those who like a classic 4 or 5 to 1 martini, I used to drink super dry martinis with just a twist and no vermouth. However, as my tastes have (hopefully) matured I really like an old school martini with a dash of orange bitters and a couple of olives (tipsy olives, prefered).
     
  14. Jen

    Jen Well-Known Member

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    ^ Agreed. If you can taste the alcohol, it's not a girly drink.
    Well...
    This girly likes her single malts straight up[​IMG]
    Never been much of a martini drinker, though. I may just have to order one next time I'm out.
     
  15. Martinis at 8

    Martinis at 8 Well-Known Member

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    Well... This girly likes her single malts straight up...
    Same with Mrs. M8. MacCallan's 18-yr. old, served neat.
     
  16. Mute

    Mute Well-Known Member

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    Some of us guys prefer our single malts that way as well.
     
  17. Huntsman

    Huntsman Well-Known Member

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    I like to ask the barkeep for my scotch "just as it pours."

    ~ Huntsman
     
  18. Saucemaster

    Saucemaster Well-Known Member

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    Does it even count if you don't drink it neat?
     
  19. chrysalid

    chrysalid Well-Known Member

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    I like to ask the barkeep for my scotch "just as it pours."

    ~ Huntsman


    i mentioned in the JW thread - some cask strength scotch needs a bit of water (soda or still) - much above 50%abv and i can't taste much at all, also it can feel like it's burning all the skin off the back of my throat - nasty. up in scotland nearly all the old boys my family knows drink scotch with water, no ice - just water.

    as for gin, bombay saphire is my favourite - i reckon its a bit more delicate than some of the more expensive ones, i'm no martini specialist though. vodka and you can't go far wrong with stolichnaya - cheap and russian and i love the label as well. i saw a stolichnaya blue label in a shop once but never bought it - anyone heard of? think it might have been 'crystal' or something...nothing on their web site. smirnoff black is nice as well, their red and blue labels taste of embalming fluid, but neat freezered black label has a subtle smoky, almost peaty, taste - lovely
     
  20. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Well-Known Member

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    I prefer Boodles and Beefeater to the new premium gins. I am actually not clear that there ever was a need for premium gin (or premium vodka for that matter).
     

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