1. Welcome to the new Styleforum!

    We hope you’re as excited as we are to hang out in the new place. There are more new features that we’ll announce in the near future, but for now we hope you’ll enjoy the new site.

    We are currently fine-tuning the forum for your browsing pleasure, so bear with any lingering dust as we work to make Styleforum even more awesome than it was.

    Oh, and don’t forget to head over to the Styleforum Journal, because we’re giving away two pairs of Carmina shoes to celebrate our move!

    Please address any questions about using the new forum to support@styleforum.net

    Cheers,

    The Styleforum Team

    Dismiss Notice

I screwed up. What next? *Super long, you probably shouldn't read*

Discussion in 'Business, Careers & Education' started by WhoopsBusto, Mar 3, 2012.

  1. Nereis

    Nereis Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,374
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2009
    

    I'd argue that a business major with enough hard math/statistics courses and a history of entrepreneurship/extracurriculars would know quite a bit about the business world, if only because they've been living and breathing business for half a decade and evidently have a passion for it. It's harder to sell yourself as an English Lit major unless you are just plain smart.
     
  2. idfnl

    idfnl Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    14,339
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2008
    Location:
    VA
    

    IMO, unless you are learning a specific skill college education prices have rendered them much less useful than in the past. The $ you have to spend takes forever to pay back now so the increased income is squeezed out. Advanced degrees are a dime a dozen and even a phd doesnt carry the same weight anymore.

    For me, I always want someone on my team with experience over education.
     
  3. violethour1951

    violethour1951 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    643
    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2012
    Location:
    USA
    sell some of your clothes & hit up a full time job (even if, as you mention, there's no upward mobility) to pay off at least part of the debt, in the short term it will help you with the mental pressure.
     
  4. globetrotter

    globetrotter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    20,605
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2004
    Location:
    greater chicago
    

    well, no, I don't mean to be at all insulting, but I had real, sellable skills. I read your post carefully, I don't think that you do.

    as to why I wouldn't chose philosophy - I didn't enjoy it as much as I thought I would. I didn't really like the people I studies with - they were all a bunch of arogant twats who all thought that they would be the next great philosopher. I did learn a lot of stuff, but I would probably do it differently now.
     
  5. globetrotter

    globetrotter Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    20,605
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2004
    Location:
    greater chicago
    

    this is good advice
     
  6. why

    why Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,735
    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2007
    

    I think the biggest problem with humanities degrees are the lack of internships available. It makes finding the crucial first job to break the need-experience-to-get-experience conundrum much more difficult.

    Most business degrees also require some kind of training in particular areas and many universities offer courses that aid certification in a particular field (HR and such).

    The stigma arises from the type of person that often majors in the humanities. Don't tell me the stereotype isn't generally true.
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2012
    1 person likes this.
  7. idfnl

    idfnl Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    14,339
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2008
    Location:
    VA
    

    If I owned the world youd grad high school and get a job at 50% time and study the remaining 50%, regardless what it is. The good part is you can try different vocations and course correct mid stream, make some $, get some experience. Bad part is course corrections might mean starting over, etc. Fuck the bullshit electives. Ya, they enrich you but we have Discovery Channel and BBC now.
     
  8. JohnGalt

    JohnGalt Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,880
    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2009
    Location:
    Ouray, CO
    

    this is the correct answer.
     
  9. imatlas

    imatlas Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    8,518
    Joined:
    May 27, 2008
    Location:
    El Barrio

    FTFY.
     
  10. JohnGalt

    JohnGalt Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,880
    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2009
    Location:
    Ouray, CO
    My advice comes from my experience. To each his own.
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2012
  11. imatlas

    imatlas Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    8,518
    Joined:
    May 27, 2008
    Location:
    El Barrio
    

    It's solid advice, but in general if you start out by calling someone a loser the odds that they'll pay attention go down dramatically.
     
  12. idfnl

    idfnl Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    14,339
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2008
    Location:
    VA
    

    +1

    You're correct above.

    This generation in their 20's has the potential to be the most epic sack of self entitled shit in history. They remind me of one of my father's favorite jokes: "Hey kid, what do you want to be when you grow up? - I want to be like my father - Oh ya, what does he do? - He's retired".
     
  13. imatlas

    imatlas Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    8,518
    Joined:
    May 27, 2008
    Location:
    El Barrio

    Even better. I'll bet the OP is in a real hurry to pay attention to the thoughts of someone who implies that he's an "epic sack of self entitled shit". There's no way, of course, that YOU were remotely self-entitled when you were young.
     
    1 person likes this.
  14. idfnl

    idfnl Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    14,339
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2008
    Location:
    VA
    

    Problem is when you try and teach the 20-somethings anything they immediately view you with derision. The what do you know and you're not the boss of me bullshit. I interview pretty regularly both for my team and for others and I rarely encounter one with the right work ethic. I'm 39, and my hires in their 50's almost always work out. 20's are almost always trouble.
     
  15. idfnl

    idfnl Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    14,339
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2008
    Location:
    VA
    

    I wasn't self entitled - that attitude is new - but I was certainly unwilling to listen to those that knew more than I did. When I finally started to listen around age 27 my career took off. Older folks were as right when I was 21 as when I was 28. The difference was that it took that many years to realize I was banging my head and repeating the same mistakes.

    To the younger members reading this: dont take it personally, its not an attack. But you really dont know shit. You'll understand when you get a bit older.
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2012
  16. JohnGalt

    JohnGalt Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,880
    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2009
    Location:
    Ouray, CO
    In fairness, I thought to not quote that first paragraph in my response, but then just didn't. I'll make no presumptions on the OP and hope that he does get his shit together. With that being said, it is generally applicable to many in the OP's generation, as idfnl correctly notes.

    They'll eventually get it - I maintain hope. :nodding:
     
  17. WhoopsBusto

    WhoopsBusto Member

    Messages:
    7
    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2012
    Meh, every generation says that about the generation that follows them. I take it with a grain of salt and look at the rest of the message that a poster is trying to send to me.

    Since my last post I've gone to my community college to get an idea of what I'll have to do to get into school full time. I've been pushing away from the idea of going to school for philosophy and instead looking at supply chain management. I already have experience in the field from my old job, having created and managed a six figure budget, created an inventory ordering/tracking system, etc. and it's something that interests me. The community college has a partnership with the local university which offers fixed rate tuition and guaranteed admission into my program of study.

    I have a job lined up too. My grandparents own a roofing business and are looking to retire in a few years, and they need someone to handle the office tasks among other things. Right now I'm making $350/wk which probably won't cover my expenses but once I assume more responsibilities I'll get paid more. I also found a way to play online poker from the US so from May through August I plan to go to school while playing full time in hopes of clearing makeup and earning some money of my own. Once my full time school schedule starts I'll likely quit poker completely (or close to it) and work for my grandparents when I can to pay the bills.

    I don't have a car yet and I'm living at home right now (not for free) but my parents will let me borrow their spare car for the time being and there should be a lot of apartments available for lease in a couple of months when school is out.
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2012
  18. idfnl

    idfnl Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    14,339
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2008
    Location:
    VA
    

    Minus the first paragraph, this sounds like a sensible kid talking.

    Dont meh us... there is a reason every generation says that: its true. Be different and bypass the mistakes we've made for you. Fuck the poker for $ bit, just enjoy the game and maybe make a few bucks. Playing when you know you have to earn is a different experience and not that pleasant.

    Ask your parents if they will let you live free if you demonstrate results in school. But prove it. You'd be amazed the respect you garner when you act responsibly. I remember the year I earned more than my dad, it was a strange experience seeing him look at me differently. Now I make 4x more than he ever made in a year so he shuts the fuck up and listens to me now which is an odd reversal. When you get smart things will move quickly. You must be willing to develop yourself and let it take its time.
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by