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How old is the fabric on your new suit?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by MyOtherLife, Oct 6, 2009.

  1. Despos

    Despos Well-Known Member

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    These overpriced tailors are stickin to the people. Pretty soon they will all be driving Cadilacs. And what about old wine, shouldn't I get a discount on the old stuff? Only new wine and new cloth for me.
     
  2. a tailor

    a tailor Well-Known Member

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    You guys complicate things sometimes. I just want to know the sheep's name.

    do you have romance in mind?
     
  3. upnorth

    upnorth Well-Known Member

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    While not morally upright, we can give credit to the tailor for having the connections and resources to be able to score these fabrics at cheaper prices and enhance the range for his clients. If you are a regular, usually he tends to charge you lesser for it anyway since a good tailor is equally concerned about reputation of fair pricing and his main job is the labor that goes into making the suit.

    If I were the tailor, such discount cloths would be a good way to entice customers into buying a suit from me, or trying out for the first time. Charging a higher amount than the necessary markups seem like a lazy way to profit and may ultimately work out to a tailor's chagrin.

    Hypothetically, suppose the tailor were to buy fabrics at his regular prices, kept it with him for a couple of years in pristine condition and then a customer chooses that particular fabric, can we penalize the tailor by asking for a discount since it's an old fabric? It doesn't make sense.
     
  4. Fishball

    Fishball Well-Known Member

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    I think that is why CMT is a good practice. Bring your own fabrics!
     
  5. Butterfly

    Butterfly Well-Known Member

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    Why should anyone care, exactly?
     
  6. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Well-Known Member

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    These overpriced tailors are stickin to the people. Pretty soon they will all be driving Cadilacs. And what about old wine, shouldn't I get a discount on the old stuff? Only new wine and new cloth for me.

    I love that "new cloth" smell at your place. And that fresh boxed wine really gives you an edge. [​IMG]
     
  7. Sanguis Mortuum

    Sanguis Mortuum Well-Known Member

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    Why should anyone care, exactly?

    Exactly what I was thinking...
     
  8. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Well-Known Member

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    You guys complicate things sometimes. I just want to know the sheep's name.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  9. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Well-Known Member

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    Why should anyone care, exactly?

    The OP is one of those guys who thinks the clothing retail world is out to rip him off.
     
  10. MyOtherLife

    MyOtherLife Well-Known Member

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    The OP is one of those guys who thinks the clothing retail world is out to rip him off.
    Retail is out to rip all of us off. As I stated, a friend of mine told me about the fabric 'scam'. That is what raised my question. Nothing more. The point of my question was to ascertain whether or not, on principle, older stock should fetch the same price as newer stock. It is an absolutely valid question. Day old bread gets reduced in price for a reason. Last years car models are also reduced in price lower than this years or next years models. And since tailors -do- buy older fabric stock at reduced prices, then the industry supports my claim. If it didn't, then older fabric would not be discounted to them in the first place. Therefore, the tailors savings should be passed to the customer. It would have nothing to do with his labor costs.
     
  11. David Reeves

    David Reeves Well-Known Member

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    If you select from the in house bolts at your tailor shop, most of them are "old stock", in the sense that they are not this year design.
    Bespoke tailoring is not "fashion", the fabrics house do not sell "this year" stock at heavy discount then replace by "new" one.
    Yea, you can got deep discount sometime, but keep in mind that it was also cost for keeping stock.


    Sort of true but Dormeuil produces new designs every 6 Months because they provide to the "fashion" brands like Tom Ford, Gucci, Prada etc. If you buy from a current book your tailor isn't ripping you off. Having said that cloth has no expiration date it is about style and some of the older stuff may even be better.

    The Dormeuil show room in NYC has old bolts of cloth that are discounted I offer these to my clients with a discount.
     
  12. AndrewRogers

    AndrewRogers Well-Known Member

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    Seriously.

    I've used their pants before and they are GREAT, but this was before they introduced a creepy tracker.
     
  13. TC11201

    TC11201 Well-Known Member

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    Retail is out to rip all of us off. As I stated, a friend of mine told me about the fabric 'scam'.
    That is what raised my question. Nothing more.
    The point of my question was to ascertain whether or not, on principle, older stock should fetch the same price as newer stock. It is an absolutely valid question.
    Day old bread gets reduced in price for a reason.
    Last years car models are also reduced in price lower than this years or next years models.
    And since tailors -do- buy older fabric stock at reduced prices, then the industry supports my claim.
    If it didn't, then older fabric would not be discounted to them in the first place.
    Therefore, the tailors savings should be passed to the customer.
    It would have nothing to do with his labor costs.


    I fail to see why the price of the fabric should matter to a potential customer any more than any other component of production, for instance, the cost of the tailor's labor. More broadly, I failt to see why anyone should care about the tailor's margin at all - care about the price to you and whether you feel it worth paying. If one starts going down this path, why not ask him his hourly labor fee as well in order to judge whether that's fair or not? How about the cost of interlinings, the thread, the undercollar felt, the padding for the shoulders? Why not start worrying about the fabric mill's margins as well? How about the landlord's margins on the tailor's rent (he can move after all)? Why simply judge the fairness of one small component? All of that and much more is buried into the cost of the garment after all.

    Look, the tailor will offer you a price for the completed garment. If you like the price (or at least believe that it represents a fair economic and emotional trade to you as a buyer), commission the garment. If the price is too high, either try to negotiate or move on. The market will quickly take care of tailors who are too expensive for the quality (or perception of quality) offered. His ultimate margin and where he gets that margin from shouldn't matter anymore than your (you generally, not specifically the OP) salary should be judged by others. Most of us don't run around worrying about the margins built into everyday consumer goods (or services), even though they are much, much fatter than anything most tailors could hope for. Most people I know certainly don't worry about fabric cost when buying RTW clothing, not sure why this would be any different.

    Additionally, the vast majority of tailors aren't exactly getting rich plying their trade - if anything it's the opposite. If, due to their connections and knowledge, they are able to do some things to take home a little more, why begrudge that? The fabric isn't any worse for being a year older, the vast majority of bespoke fabrics stay within a tightly bounded range of designs which vary little year to year (most bespoke aspires to timelessness, not latest fashion), and the pricing difference isn't going to matter that much anyway - if the tailor is able to get fabric at $25 a yard rather than $75 a yard (and the fabric might retail for $150 per yard - others here will know the retail margin better than I), would you really notice the $200 difference on your $2000 or $3000 bespoke suit?

    My advice - if the price works for you based on all you know about the tailor and the offer, hit the bid, if it doesn't move on and let the market do its work. Learning about fabrics may well be wise, but more to ensure you commission a garment that you like and will enjoy over long period of time rather than to determine "fairness".
     
  14. globetrotter

    globetrotter Well-Known Member

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    ^^I hope the above is sarcasm... Honestly who cares? Fabrics don't change all that much from year to year.

    +1
     
  15. Will

    Will Well-Known Member

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    Well dressed men are happy to pay more when they find quality older fabrics as the best were better made than much of the new stuff. And like wine, it costs money to hold inventory for decades so the price should go up.
     
  16. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Well-Known Member

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    The OP is one of those guys who thinks the clothing retail world is out to rip him off.

    Retail is out to rip all of us off.

    Case closed [​IMG]

    Well dressed men are happy to pay more when they find quality older fabrics as the best were better made than much of the new stuff. And like wine, it costs money to hold inventory for decades so the price should go up.

    + ∞
     
  17. Nicola

    Nicola Well-Known Member

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    You guys are missing the big one. I bought new shoes. Imagine when and how the cow died? They wouldn't tell me! Some thing fishy
     
  18. lasbar

    lasbar Well-Known Member

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    Where the fabric has been made is very important. Huddersfield mills have a proud history of producing great fabrics with quality wools
    For a non connaisseur , this is just a detail and people buy a suit because they like it.
    For others, picking up the fabric is a major part of the commision.
    The other issue raised was the price.Do your homework and do no be afraid to go around different tailors.
     

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