1. Welcome to the new Styleforum!

    We hope you’re as excited as we are to hang out in the new place. There are more new features that we’ll announce in the near future, but for now we hope you’ll enjoy the new site.

    We are currently fine-tuning the forum for your browsing pleasure, so bear with any lingering dust as we work to make Styleforum even more awesome than it was.

    Oh, and don’t forget to head over to the Styleforum Journal, because we’re giving away two pairs of Carmina shoes to celebrate our move!

    Please address any questions about using the new forum to support@styleforum.net

    Cheers,

    The Styleforum Team

    Dismiss Notice

How much of a break?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by WJTW, Jan 19, 2005.

  1. Giona Granata

    Giona Granata Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    203
    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2004
    Location:
    Milano
    This is a, personal, rule I do not understand as cuff are less formal so they should go, even better, if trousers have no pleats.
     
  2. uppercase

    uppercase Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    119
    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2004
    I can support Giona's comment: yes, the bespoke Italian tailors will tell you that the trouser should be cut a length so that the sock will not show when walking; the result is a rather big break in the trouser.
    Also, the trouser cuff is slanted and is about 5 cm. high.

    On the other hand, a larger Italian MTM house, such as Kiton, more fashion oriented, will promote a shorter trouser with little break. The salesmen have their trousers ending around their ankles. And very, very narrow.

    Bespoke and fashion Italian houses have very different philosophies; it is up to the client to choose. Having said that, the trouser in Italy today is generally worn high, with very minimal break. Brown shoes are de riguer, whatever the dress, day and night.

    My take is that the Italian bespoke houses are guided in their style sense by a conservative, elegant past: their take on how a gentleman should look based on a Savile Row sensibility , interpreted for an Italian aristocracy, their historical clients.
     
  3. Etruscan

    Etruscan Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    135
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2004
    Location:
    Boston
    If memory serves, the bit of leather enclosing the back of a shoe above the actual heel (which is horizontal in plane and comes in contact with the ground) is called the 'counter.' Am I mistaken about this, or do others recognize the term?

    Etruscan
     
  4. ATM

    ATM Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    432
    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2005
    Location:
    Detroit suburbs
    I've always followed the same rule but I don't remember why. Either someone told that it's a rule or one day I just decided that I like pants that way. Now it's ingrained.
     
  5. Manton

    Manton Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    41,568
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2002
    Location:
    In Hiding
    A counter is an additional piece of leather that covers the rear of the shoe. Not all shoes have them.
     
  6. cuffthis

    cuffthis Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    826
    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2004
    Location:
    New Hope, PA
    My idea of what the proper break of the trouser over the shoe should be [​IMG]
     
  7. WJTW

    WJTW Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    99
    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2004
    I have seen some pants with only a slight break on the pants but are long enough to cover the socks or even the quarters (if that is the term) even when walking... how can this be accomplished?

    In other words, how can the pants be long enough to cover the quarter of the shoe when walking yet produce only a slight break when standing?

    Should the pants slant more to the heels or are there other methods to achieve this?

    WJTW
     
  8. Manton

    Manton Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    41,568
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2002
    Location:
    In Hiding
    Slanting is the main way. 1/2" of break on a straight-hemmed, cuffed trouser will also achieve the same look on most guys.
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by