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How can I pull myself out of this self-induced rut?

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by robbie, Apr 19, 2009.

  1. robbie

    robbie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Nebraska
    I am 23.

    I have a job with Target that allows me little more income than is necessary to exist (rent, etc). I have some college, but no degrees/certificates/etc. I am a hard worker, and I am appreciated as an employee... but I work for a massive corporation; and while I realize I am somewhat of an asset, in the grand scheme of things I am essentially replacable.

    I can't advance much past where I am currently without a degree, and can't attend college on what little I make.

    I am getting married soon and while I know my fiance will love me regardless of whether I am flat broke, or a millionaire... I cannot kid myself, my ego is tied to how successful I feel, and how well I feel I am contributing to our marriage financially. My fiance is not pressuring me, she is proud of my accomplisments and of me. I feel however I am not living up to my potential, and have a hard time being content.

    I realize money =/= contentment, but I want to go back to school and use it as a stepping stone towards knowledge,money, and contentment etc.

    I am just so intimidated by the idea of going back to a liberal arts college. I get overwhelmed, and feel I am taking 2-3 classes of no interest, and 1 maybe 2 with the smallest slivers of interesting course material.

    Are there jobs/fields that don't require a formal education yet provide a person with the time/money to pursue their interests/leisure as well? I have tried to think of them, and never seem to come up with anything that doesn't completely suck.

    I just don't feel like I learn in that environment. I don't do well in college. I apply myself and really put my nose down and still make poor grades. College can't be the only option and I really don't see myself enjoying something offered by a trade school.

    I have toyed around withit, welding,electrician apprentice etc... and it just isnt for me.

    I have taken multiple personality tests used to give me an idea of what careers might bring fulfilment.

    I just am not there.

    I realize few people enjoy their job, but if I have to tolerate a job/career I atleast want to make money.

    HOW?

    I hope I haven't asked the same question too many times, or a question that gets over asked here...

    I just am looking for some perspective.

    thanks.
     
  2. robin

    robin Well-Known Member

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    I assume since you're asking this question that you aren't marrying up.

    Have you thought about the military?
     
  3. celery

    celery Well-Known Member

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    There are technical / vocational professions which can pay quite well in time.

    Plumber, electrician, construction, information technologies and so on.

    I don't know if you will like any of the stuff, but you can make money with those and down the road you can even start your own business in one of these fields and do really well for yourself.

    You can also look into becoming a police officer, they get great benefits, make decent money and have upwards mobility.


    No matter what you choose in life, there is no short cut (outside of being born into money).
     
  4. robbie

    robbie Well-Known Member

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    I don't think my view of the military and their business would make me a viable candidate for service.
     
  5. Warren G.

    Warren G. Well-Known Member

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    There are technical / vocational professions which can pay quite well in time. Plumber, electrician, construction, information technologies and so on. I don't know if you will like any of the stuff, but you can make money with those and down the road you can even start your own business in one of these fields and do really well for yourself. You can also look into becoming a police officer, they get great benefits, make decent money and have upwards mobility. No matter what you choose in life, there is no short cut (outside of being born into money).
    Yeah +1 Robbie, consider picking up a trade. They all make a solid living, and you can excel from there.
     
  6. rjakapeanut

    rjakapeanut Well-Known Member

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    yeah, pick up a trade. if you do it the right way you can build up a nice little stash of cash and one day open up your own operation.

    my dad is a carpenter. he's been doing it for 25 years. it's all he knows. if he tried to network and get alot of jobs (its easy if you troll craigslists and similar places) he'd be really well off. he did a $1,000 job in three days last weekend all by himself. the moneys even better in other areas of construction. but he doesn't do it the right way.

    if i wasn't going to college i'd learn a trade, network, do my own work, be my own boss and start my own operation.
     
  7. why

    why Well-Known Member

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    +1 on the trade. Construction can pay really well, although right now it's really slow.

    Working hard in a small organization gets noticed.
     
  8. Johnathan

    Johnathan Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Chicago
    I'm not sure how much free time you have (it doesn't sound like much), but maybe some sort of volunteer work would at least make you feel like you were in less of a rut. I did it for a year and half during a pretty low period of my life and I don't know where I'd be if I hadn't.
     
  9. robbie

    robbie Well-Known Member

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    Nebraska
    I appreciate all the suggestions so far.

    I have tried looking into some volunteer work Jonathan. I do a little with my church, but really need to look into something involving Adult Literacy. I worked with several functional illiterates, and it really pained me to see them trying to make sense of instructions, ordering food at lunch etc.

    Thanks for the reminder man.

    Keep the suggestions coming by the way, I really do appreciate them.
     
  10. bawlin

    bawlin Well-Known Member

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    You're right, working for a big corporation, you'll never get anything out of it other than a salary and benefits. I've worked for big business before and I will never in my life do it again, ever. They can contract me to work for me, but as an actual employee, never.

    Whatever you do, don't force anything upon yourself. I'm 23 years old as well, and while I do have a degree, I don't have the slightest clue about what I want from life. I know very well what I don't want, and that's a start, but without knowing what you want and more importantly what you want to do, it makes things difficult and rather painful.

    What I suggest you do is sit down one night and start writing down your strengths and weaknesses. Once you have them written down, cross out all your weaknesses and try to figure out how you can exploit your strengths. At this age, there's no point in trying to fix what's wrong with you. You are who you are, and there's nothing wrong with that at all.

    It's a difficult spot that you're in, and trust me I know how much it sucks, but you'll eventually work through it.

    Best!
     
  11. Grenadier

    Grenadier Well-Known Member

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    Mar 23, 2009
    Location:
    Phoenix, Arizona
    Are there jobs/fields that don't require a formal education yet provide a person with the time/money to pursue their interests/leisure as well?

    Yes; in no particular order:

    1. Prostitution
    2. Drug dealing
    3. Robbery
    4. Online Gambling
    5. Sheer chance
    6. Long-term Disability
     
  12. sloane3

    sloane3 Well-Known Member

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    Dec 30, 2008
    Why don't you keep playing mickey mouse games on styleforum, posting pics of yourself so other men can comment on how your clothes fit?

    The world needs ditchdiggers and people to ring me up at SuperTarget too.
     
  13. Musselma

    Musselma Well-Known Member

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    Summerville, SC
    At this age, there's no point in trying to fix what's wrong with you. You are who you are, and there's nothing wrong with that at all.

    I hope this was sarcasm, because it's always worth it to try and make yourself a better person.
     
  14. Aperipan

    Aperipan Well-Known Member

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    My cousin is a Yale graduate and guess what he does for a living now? He cuts hair. He also makes a lot of money, cutting hair. With my father's blessings, he may even have his own shop in the next few months. Our whole family is shitting on him but he had turned a dismal state of being into something quite lucrative.
     
  15. Huntsman

    Huntsman Well-Known Member

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    Electricians and welders can get paid more than many 'professional' jobs, but you need at least levels of certification to get into them, and/or apprenticeships.
     
  16. GQgeek

    GQgeek Well-Known Member

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    Trades are the way to go if you don't like studying. They're more hands-on. You will not succeed at university if you are not interested in the material, especially if you have to continue working while you attend.
     
  17. JayJay

    JayJay Well-Known Member

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    I assume since you're asking this question that you aren't marrying up.

    Sounds a bit cold, but I guess it does matter.
     
  18. JayJay

    JayJay Well-Known Member

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    Trades are the way to go if you don't like studying. They're more hands-on. You will not succeed at university if you are not interested in the material, especially if you have to continue working while you attend.
    I agree. You could eventually create your own business.
     
  19. Spatlese

    Spatlese Well-Known Member

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    I would be on the trades train as well if I didn't pursue my current path.

    And I actually think this is outstanding.....

    My cousin is a Yale graduate and guess what he does for a living now? He cuts hair. He also makes a lot of money, cutting hair. With my father's blessings, he may even have his own shop in the next few months. Our whole family is shitting on him but he had turned a dismal state of being into something quite lucrative.
     
  20. Milhouse

    Milhouse Well-Known Member

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    May 11, 2007
    Another vote on trades. One of my friends interned or whatever they call it with the electrician's union while in high school. He decided he liked it, so he went to a university and got a 4 year degree in "electrical technology" or something that qualified him to be an electrician, but also qualified him to do a lot more.

    Now he makes really good money because he holds licenses to repair all kinds of sensitive and critical infrastructure things.

    So, you could always go to trade school now, learn a trade, and then if you decide you want to get more specialized, or into a supervisory role or something, you can do a similar university degree once you are in a different mindset.
     

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