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Houses with 'No Shoe' Rules

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by RSS, Aug 25, 2011.

  1. otc

    otc Well-Known Member

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    Also, is there anything worse than coming to an apartment where people keep an ugly pile of shoes *outside* their door?

    If I lived above someone like this and had to walk past some ugly pile of 14 shoes sitting on the landing every time I went upstairs to my apartment, I'd probably have to remind either the tennant or the landlord that personal belongings and $9.95 shoe rack furniture don't belong in the common areas of the building.
     
  2. Gdot

    Gdot Well-Known Member

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    Oh - and for all of the germ o phobes out there -

    Wall to wall carpeting is the filfthiest stuff on earth. No amount of steaming/cleaning can actually remove the dirt that has settled into the backing and padding. Even fabulously maintained carpet is filfthy underneath the backing. And the potential for biological action in wall to wall carpet is quite high.

    Area rugs may be rolled up, taken out and cleaned - thus if maintained are far cleaner.

    Oh - and as far as the germs on things outside which you might track into your home you might want to understand more about the germ killing power of sunlight (UV).

    Much of the visible 'dirt' from outdoors which has actually been exposed to UV light is far less microbially active than your 'clean' carpets indoors. Just the fact that you can or cannot see dirt has little bearing on the actual microbial activity happening on an object.

    Sleep Well !!!!!!!!!

    :stirpot:
     
  3. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member

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    This. Sure, I prefer to keep my shoes on, but it's their house.


    That said, I'd never ask anyone to remove their shoes in my place. I hate fussiness.
     
  4. CDFS

    CDFS Well-Known Member

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    Mostly the other way around from where I'm sitting on the couch without my shoes.



    Quote: Have you ever taken a piss standing up without your pants on...
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2011
  5. otc

    otc Well-Known Member

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    I refuse to allow people who have urinated since putting their pants on to use my furniture--don't people know what catheters are for? Those little droplets splash back everywhere!
     
  6. imatlas

    imatlas Well-Known Member

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    it would be rude to ask your guest to install a catheter, but it would be ruder to refuse.
     
  7. Gdot

    Gdot Well-Known Member

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    remind me not to accept any invitations to your house!!!!!

    :rotflmao:
     
  8. Bounder

    Bounder Well-Known Member

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    This is still going on?


    This.


    I am not sure that I really agree with this but it is so funny that I want to.

    Exactly correct and perfectly put.


    This has certainly not been my experience. Do you live in an ethnic enclave?

    Let's bottom line this.

    If you live in a part of the world where this is a strongly-established custom, fine. When I visit that part of the world, I draw no negative inferences from the request to remove my shoes. My experience, as I said, is that very often, there is a polite tug-of-war wherein I insist on respecting local custom and my host urges me not to. I know this is not everyone's experience. I usually am visiting people with a lot of multi-cultural experience, perhaps that explains it.

    If you grew up with a really strong cultural tradition of removing shoes but now live somewhere it is not customary, I may give you a pass as well. But, while I originally posted the medical-shoe-booty thing as a joke, I am now thinking that it is the perfect and almost charming solution in this case. The host's deep-seated cultural instincts are respected and the guest isn't made uncomfortable.

    BTW, the snow boot thing is a red herring. Yeah, when I lived in places with miserable winters, I didn't wear my Sorels in the house. I didn't wear them at work, either. If I were wearing snow boots, I always had a pair of shoes to change into. I am having real trouble with the idea that people on SF are contemplating wading through slush in their EGs. Have you people not heard of Tingleys?

    So that leaves the case where people have just decided to make everyone entering their house remove their shoes to protect the carpets. As it is their house, they are free to do so, of course. But they should consider that it marks them as boorish in that they place a higher premium on things than people. Miss Manners, as always, has the definitive word here,

    Failing to take off one's shoes when arriving at a dinner party in Japan would show a lack of respect for the hosts, while seating guests with their backs to the most decorative part of the room is understood to honor them by having these objects serve as their background. But taking off one's shoes upon arriving at an American dinner party would be a demonstration of disrespect, while an American host who asks guests to remove their shoes in order to preserve the cleanliness of the carpet is disrespectful to the guests, by showing more honor to his possessions than to them.

    So go ahead and insist all you want. Thunder on about germs and dirt and dog poo. The unalterable fact is that in a region where there is no cultural imperative to do so, you are being rude by asking your guests to remove their shoes. If you can live with that, I guess everyone else can, too.
     
  9. caxt

    caxt Well-Known Member

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    I’m noticing a theme throughout many of these posts. It seems Southerners are much less concerned then Northerners and/or foreigners about shoe removal in houses.

    Some hypotheses:
    1.Northern States which have a larger influx of inclement “dirty” weather and higher concentrations of immigrants more deeply focus this cultural norm.
    2.Southern hospitality places the position of the guest above the host.
    3.Being in a hotter climate and being less prone to wear socks, Southerners understand that removing shoes is not always a pleasant experience for bystanders.

    Living in the South and having visited several other Southern States, I will share what others will think of you as in several situations:

    -If as a host you instruct your guests to remove their shoes before entering your house your request would be complied with, but you would have offended your guests unless you had a very good explanation or were obviously of Asian heritage. Furthermore if this occurred during a party event several people would leave after a short period of time.
    (This rule does not apply to mothers addressing their son’s young friends under the age of twelve, because they are too young to know better. Adults are expected to be clean and would never think of entering a house in a soiled condition.)

    -If as a host you greeted and entertained guests barefoot, you would be seen at best as a novelty.

    -As a guest, if you entered someone’s home and immediately removed your shoes, you would be seen as an oddity. It would be similar to what how I expect Asians react when an American goes inside with their shoes donned or showing up in a t-shirt and shorts to.

    -Lastly, if you threw a black tie party and indicated that shoe removal was necessary you would be committing a deadly social offense and could expect to lose some friends. (Pretty much can not imagine someone actually demanding this though.)
     
  10. GBR

    GBR Well-Known Member

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    Don't accept an invitation to visit and tell them why or, if they spring it upon you, turn on your heel and leave directly.
     
  11. imatlas

    imatlas Well-Known Member

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    - Your guests will curse you to hell for the mortal sin of offending their precious sensibilities.

    :)
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2011
  12. facet

    facet Well-Known Member

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    I had the same experience as Dib visiting friends in England; I believe it was the same in Germany, although my memory fails me here. All were of non-immigrant, caucasian descent.
     
  13. james_timothy

    james_timothy Well-Known Member

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    I missed this the first time around- it's great.

    The model fails for mixed households though, like many of the folks here. Then you just get to decide they are "bland, parochial fucks" because thats what you want to think of them anyway.
     
  14. CharlesAlexander

    CharlesAlexander Well-Known Member

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    This literally had me rolling on the floor.
     
  15. Nicola

    Nicola Well-Known Member

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    4) In some countries owning shoes is so unusual you don't want to take them off. You risk the strange leather goods being stolen to be turned into flower pots.
     
  16. Bounder

    Bounder Well-Known Member

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    Be careful. Those things are filthy.
     
  17. james_timothy

    james_timothy Well-Known Member

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    I point to the southernmost state in the Union is not Southern.

    I point to removing shoes in that state is more or less the norm.

    That is all.
     
  18. Master Squirrel

    Master Squirrel Well-Known Member

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    Eleven pages?

    I'd like to point out that it seems to be very much a part of our culture to remove one's shoes in a guests house. However, this is a courtesy thing. Few people would take offense if someone wore shoes in the house or if they were asked to remove them at an others. I don't think this extends to parties with the exception of winter where guest will pile their shoes on the porch. This also does not extend to formal functions.

    For those not from the colder climates: One of the things that shoes do in the winter is collect snow and dirt and ice. Shoes left on the foot produce water and mud puddles from the ice melting.... and for those unlucky individuals in stockings who step in these puddles:a nice ice cold wet foot. I think this is why the tradition exists.
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2011
  19. RSS

    RSS Well-Known Member

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    I spend a fair amount of time in Washington (San Juan Islands), California (Bay Area), New York (New York), Louisiana (New Orleans), Missouri (St. Louis), and England (London). Moreover I travel extensively and visit people in their homes. Except in in a few cultures where removing shoes has long been the norm, I have very rarely been asked to remove my shoes. That said, the two occurences that lead to this thread both occurred in suburban Orinda, California.

    There is something more at play here than location.
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2011
  20. imatlas

    imatlas Well-Known Member

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    If somebody asks you to take off their shoes in Orinda, and they are caucasian, then they're probably pretentious little shits.
     

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