1. Welcome to the new Styleforum!

    We hope you’re as excited as we are to hang out in the new place. There are more new features that we’ll announce in the near future, but for now we hope you’ll enjoy the new site.

    We are currently fine-tuning the forum for your browsing pleasure, so bear with any lingering dust as we work to make Styleforum even more awesome than it was.

    Oh, and don’t forget to head over to the Styleforum Journal, because we’re giving away two pairs of Carmina shoes to celebrate our move!

    Please address any questions about using the new forum to support@styleforum.net

    Cheers,

    The Styleforum Team

    Dismiss Notice

Home Made Sausage, Cured, and Smoked Meats

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Piobaire, Nov 7, 2009.

  1. Piobaire

    Piobaire Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    50,189
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
    It's mostly because that gives it the best texture. Keeping it cold keeps the fat from melting and smearing all over into the meat mixture. You can make the sausage without it being cold, but it wouldn't be as fine a texture, but more rustic. It's like making pie dough.

    That is how it is explained and I followed the precautions strictly. I have to tell you, the texture of this sausage makes all store bought seem like garbage. It was a great revelation for me. I think my careful, gentle saute and monitoring internal temp to only 155 played a part too. Fat was not lost in the cooking and it was just the juiciest, best textured sausage I've ever had. Ruhlman waxes poetic in his book, and now I know why.
     
  2. why

    why Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,735
    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2007
    Fat was not lost in the cooking and it was just the juiciest, best textured sausage I've ever had.

    Some fat should be lost -- that's the purpose of the extra fat in most sausages. Otherwise the sausage tastes like boiled meat. I'm sure this is the case of what happened with yours, so don't take that as an affront.

    The only sausage I make at home regularly is livermush because I can't buy it north of the Mason Dixon line. There's a few really good butchers around here that make great sausages (except for blood and livermush). Kielbasa, smoked bratwursts, Italian, etc.
     
  3. Piobaire

    Piobaire Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    50,189
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
    Some fat should be lost -- that's the purpose of the extra fat in most sausages. Otherwise the sausage tastes like boiled meat. I'm sure this is the case of what happened with yours, so don't take that as an affront.

    The only sausage I make at home regularly is livermush because I can't buy it north of the Mason Dixon line. There's a few really good butchers around here that make great sausages (except for blood and livermush). Kielbasa, smoked bratwursts, Italian, etc.


    Some fat was lost, but it was minimal compared to what often happens. Part of this was due to the careful cooking; split casing leads to a dry sausage. Again, I have to say, this whole thing has been a revelation in just how good a sausage can be.

    Yes, you are lucky with the current food scene in Cleveland. Some old school places are still there, and some quality newer ones have developed.
     
  4. Douglas

    Douglas Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    14,658
    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2007
    Location:
    Purseforum
    It's mostly because that gives it the best texture. Keeping it cold keeps the fat from melting and smearing all over into the meat mixture. You can make the sausage without it being cold, but it wouldn't be as fine a texture, but more rustic. It's like making pie dough.

    Ah, I understand now. Makes sense. Thank you.
     
  5. why

    why Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,735
    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2007
    Yes, you are lucky with the current food scene in Cleveland. Some old school places are still there, and some quality newer ones have developed.
    Outside of a few, it's not all it's cracked up to be. The old ethnic stuff is great, but the West Side Market is pretty crappy outside of a few vendors that now do most of their business through their own storefronts. There are too many imitators. It's nice to see Michael Symon not let his celebrity get to his head and keep his restaurants as they were pre-Iron Chef. I went to the Velvet Tango Room again a few weeks ago and it was so affected and crowded we just left. I'm talking most of the girls dressed up as vamps and the kitschy paintings purposely hung lopsided kind of contrivance.
     
  6. Piobaire

    Piobaire Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    50,189
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
    Outside of a few, it's not all it's cracked up to be. The old ethnic stuff is great, but the West Side Market is pretty crappy outside of a few vendors that now do most of their business through their own storefronts. There are too many imitators.

    It's nice to see Michael Symon not let his celebrity get to his head and keep his restaurants as they were pre-Iron Chef.

    I went to the Velvet Tango Room again a few weeks ago and it was so affected and crowded we just left. I'm talking most of the girls dressed up as vamps and the kitschy paintings purposely hung lopsided kind of contrivance.


    I'm looking forward to eating at one of Symon's places. I'll be hitting the VTR on a Tuesday or Wednesday night, so hopefully will not be crowded. There's a few other places I want to try there too. Light Bistro looks interesting.
     
  7. Piobaire

    Piobaire Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    50,189
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
    Okay, had been unable to get a needed ingredient for other recipes: back fat. Got my head of F&B to talk to our Sysco rep. Back fat can be ordered by the case and a case is two blocks of five #. A case comes in for me Tuesday [​IMG]

    So, will be trying mortadella for sure, and maybe salami and one or two other, small recipe things TG weekend. [​IMG]
     
  8. why

    why Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,735
    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2007
    Okay, had been unable to get a needed ingredient for other recipes: back fat. Got my head of F&B to talk to our Sysco rep. Back fat can be ordered by the case and a case is two blocks of five #. A case comes in for me Tuesday [​IMG]

    So, will be trying mortadella for sure, and maybe salami and one or two other, small recipe things TG weekend. [​IMG]


    Fatback should be easy to find. If it's not in the supermarket, ask the butcher.

    Salames need to be dried and cured. You got a cellar ready with some nice humidity? [​IMG]
     
  9. Piobaire

    Piobaire Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    50,189
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
    Fatback should be easy to find. If it's not in the supermarket, ask the butcher.

    Salames need to be dried and cured. You got a cellar ready with some nice humidity? [​IMG]


    I'm happy using Sysco. They have great product and pricing is fantastic.

    As to curing. There's semi-dry and there's dry. I lack the ability to do dry, due to humidity. Dry curing needs #2 cure. Semi-dry only needs #1 cure and can be done in my smoker. I shall be doing a semi-dry, smoked salami vs. an air cured, dry salami.

    Dood, I've been reading up on this stuff for weeks now. I've got it down.
     
  10. why

    why Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,735
    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2007
    I'm happy using Sysco. They have great product and pricing is fantastic.

    As to curing. There's semi-dry and there's dry. I lack the ability to do dry, due to humidity. Dry curing needs #2 cure. Semi-dry only needs #1 cure and can be done in my smoker. I shall be doing a semi-dry, smoked salami vs. an air cured, dry salami.

    Dood, I've been reading up on this stuff for weeks now. I've got it down.


    Don't you live in Detroit? Now's the season to cure.
     
  11. Piobaire

    Piobaire Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    50,189
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
    Don't you live in Detroit? Now's the season to cure.

    Haven't lived there in over a decade.
     
  12. Piobaire

    Piobaire Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    50,189
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
    Okay, today's project was next level: emulsified meats. Namely, mortadella. I'm just finished paching them in 170 degree water and they went into an ice bath after I got the temp up to 150. So, the basic thing is, keep the ingredients cold, don't let the emulsion break. This meat is high in fat content, as in 1 lb lean pork to 12 oz back fat plus 4 oz back fat cubed and blanched folded into the emulsion.

    My steps were: cube pork and back fat. 12 oz back reserve for grinding, 4 gets blanched and folded in at the end. Take the spiced, ground pork (include some "pink salt" for curing) and add 10oz crushed ice and food process until it comes up to 40 degrees. Add ground back fat, food process until 45. Add 1/2 cup non-fat dry milk, food process until 57. Stuff in "beef middle" (middle intestine of a cow) that's made of fibrous collagen. Hog ring the ends, poach in 170 water until internal temp of 150. Almost there. Here's all the pics but tomorrow's; a shot of the finished produced sliced up.

    Here's the collagen casing soaking in water to be pliable
    [​IMG]

    Bowl full of spices and the "cure"
    [​IMG]

    Here's what cubed pig back fat looks like and the next shot is it ground up finely
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Poaching those fatties
    [​IMG]

    Ice bath to stop the cooking process
    [​IMG]

    So tomorrow I plan to make a 5 lbs batch of sausage sticks. I'll be using edible collagen casings, which makes it easy, as one roll holds five pounds stuffed. I'll be adding "cure" or nitrite salt again, as I plan to smoke them. Stay tuned.
     
  13. samus

    samus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    376
    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2007
    Okay, today's project was next level: emulsified meats. Namely, mortadella.

    Yowza. Makes me appreciate a nice muffaletta all that much more.
     
  14. Piobaire

    Piobaire Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    50,189
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
    So here's a few slices of the finished product, with a little good mustard.

    [​IMG]

    Here is today's project: beef sticks. They are out in my smoker, for stage one right now. Stage one is just applying low heat and drying them out. Soon, I'll put in some wood and up the temp. Should be ready in about 5 hours from now.

    [​IMG]
     
  15. GQgeek

    GQgeek Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    17,933
    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2002
    Location:
    Canuckistan
    God damn Piobaire, you really like it teh sausage.
     
  16. Piobaire

    Piobaire Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    50,189
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
    God damn Piobaire, you really like it teh sausage.

    I'm having fun with it, my sausage.

    I thought you ground your own meat and made sausage? Or was that just RJ snark?
     
  17. GQgeek

    GQgeek Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    17,933
    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2002
    Location:
    Canuckistan
    It's mostly snark but I do have the food grinder attachment and sausage stuffer kit for my KA Pro mixer. I've done it a couple times but it's not worth the effort when there's a good place to get sausage nearby.
     
  18. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    33,650
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2007
    Location:
    Chicago
    [​IMG]
    I'm impressed Pio.

    And I think you would have been impressed with my foie preparation on Thanksgiving. Torchon w/ poached pears, pear/shallot jam, and black pepper gastrique. The texture on the torchon was quite honestly out of this world. [​IMG]
     
  19. Piobaire

    Piobaire Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    50,189
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
    [​IMG]
    I'm impressed Pio.

    And I think you would have been impressed with my foie preparation on Thanksgiving. Torchon w/ poached pears, pear/shallot jam, and black pepper gastrique. The texture on the torchon was quite honestly out of this world. [​IMG]


    Thanks for the props. This sausage making is not easy. Simple in concept, but a bitch to execute.

    I'm sure your foie was otherwordly. I hope I get to taste your foie magic at some point. Any chance you'll be doing foie when I'm at Cyrus?

    Btw, here's the beef sticks post-hot smoking:

    [​IMG]
     
  20. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    33,650
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2007
    Location:
    Chicago
    The thing with sausage making is that your attention to detail, every little fucking one, is wildly important. Nailing 99% of the details but missing out on that tiny little piece could blow your entire sausage.

    And no, there's no chance you'd taste my foie by the time you came lol. That's at the hot apps station now, and garde manger when it's torchon. Garde Manger might be a station I could run in 6 months, but hot apps is one of the higher spots in our brigade, so it'd be at least a year before I got there.

    BTW, as always, I'm loving your beef sticks.
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by