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Gun Appreciation Thread

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by tiecollector, Aug 10, 2007.

  1. suited

    suited Well-Known Member

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    Mainly for versatility. A .300 will be enough for anything I decide to hunt in the future, and while those other rounds would get the job done (the .270 seems very popular), a .300 win mag is not an uncommon choice for elk.


    I have no way of knowing at what range my first elk will be (I was presenting an ideal range for my first elk), or what states I might chose to hunt 10 years from now.

    A question for both of you - do you think any of those other calibers can match a .300 win mag in terms of versatility?
     
  2. Mauro

    Mauro Well-Known Member

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    The .300 win mag is a great cartridge. I just think if you aren't a distance shooter it might be to much.
    Different states have different rules. A rifle might not be an option in certain states.
    I think if you want it get it. I just think if you pick up a .308 or .270 as well you will be very happy.
     
  3. JLibourel

    JLibourel Well-Known Member

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    As to the matter of the .300 Winchester Magnum vs. a lighter cartridge, first, I find shooting at elk or any other game animals at 500 yards to be cruel, unsportsmanlike and wasteful. Few men are going to have marksmanship skills to make such shots successfully.Even with today's laser rangefinders and bullet-drop-compensating reticles, such shots are very tricky, with such variables as wind and the drastic bullet drop to account for. The bullet will have lost a lot of striking power at that range, and if you do hit and wound the animal, the animal will have had a long time to get away by the time you have negotiated 500 yards of broken, rugged terrain to pick up a blood trail. A fine game animal is not an enemy soldier. Make a good stalk so that you are in certain killing range, and then shoot your animal.

    Not so much a criticism of the cartridge itself, but most rifles in the magnum calibers are far too light for their calibers, at least in my opinion. This makes them nasty to shoot and detrimental to developing good marksmanship skills and good shot placement in the field. A gun writer pal of mine in Montana remarked that nothing made a guide cringe more than a doctor arriving for an elk hunt with a .340 Weatherby! If you plan to do much shooting, barrel life will also be short with a lot of these over-bore magnums.

    And as for "versatility," what else are you planning to hunt? Admittedly, I would prefer a .300 magnum to a .30-06-class cartridge for mountain grizzly, and it will do the job on Alaskan brown bear, but most seasoned hunters and guides prefer something with more bullet weight and diameter for the biggest bruins, typically one of the .338s or .375s. The same would hold true for dangerous African game, mostly lion and Cape buffalo these days. But if you have the money for that kind of hunting, it will be no great hardship to spring for an extra rifle or two. Besides, what's wrong with having an assortment of good firearms?

    At the other end of the spectrum, this is just personal preference, but I would feel a bit silly blasting at animals like Coues deer, pronghorns or javelina with a .300 magnum.

    Just my thoughts on the matter, but I will echo the sentiment that if you have your heart set on a magnum, buy it. Just learn to shoot it well.
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. rach2jlc

    rach2jlc Well-Known Member

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    Am I really posting in this thread? Well, yes!

    Perhaps some of you know, but I'm now a homeowner of some property once belonging to my folks down in KY. Out in the country. Plenty of wild animals, snakes, and potential undesirables who drive slowly past in old trucks. Police and fire far enough away to make a difference.

    I've inherited a Mossberg shotgun that sits behind my door. Any recommendations for a good, affordable pistol that will make a difference... but not destroy much of my neighborhood if discharged?

    Kind regards,
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2015
    1 person likes this.
  5. Piobaire

    Piobaire Well-Known Member

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    I would suggest a Glock of some sort however I would listen to what Jan, Maurio, or Huntsman have to say if I were you.
     
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  6. JLibourel

    JLibourel Well-Known Member

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    My first choice in your situation would be to pick up a good second-hand vintage Smith & Wesson revolver (before they put in the "wind-up key" safety device) in .38 Special or .357 Magnum (which can also shoot .38 Specials) with about a 4-inch barrel. Second choice would be a similar Ruger GP100 revolver, new or used. Taurus revolvers are a little more "iffy." The good ones will be quite comparable to the best of current American revolvers, however. Many second-hand Colt revolvers would be good choices, but most of them command collector prices these days.

    I'm not a Glock fan. Aside from their abysmal aesthetics, the whole system is much too akin to carrying a cocked single-action automatic with a round in the chamber and the safety off, at least in my opinion. However, many very competent people do like them.
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2015
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  7. suited

    suited Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for this well thought out post. In the future, possibly moose, I'm not sure. I wouldn't be hunting grizzly, but I suppose a .300 win mag could be a rifle I could carry in brown bear country that would give some piece of mind, although a .338 would be more desirable, as you mentioned. I won't ever be hunting lion or cape buffalo. Ideally I would have the opportunity to shoot several of these calibers in the same session and consider how much practice I could get in with a .300 win mag before the recoil became too much. At the very least you have me considering smaller rounds.
     
  8. Mauro

    Mauro Well-Known Member

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    Hi. If you aren't an experienced shooter please take some classes and get familiar with gun safety.
    That being said. I think you need a gun that goes bang every time you pull the trigger.
    A wheel gun or a glock does that for sure.
    I own a glock but am not a fan. I prefer my M&P pro.
    I would go to the range and rent several guns and see what fits you best. Go from there.
    Good luck and be safe.
     
    1 person likes this.
  9. Hayward

    Hayward Well-Known Member

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    Ultimately ignition systems are about training. I was trained on DA/SA autos, so that's probably all I'll ever shoot. You're starting at the beginning and your options are open.

    Mauro's right, Go to a range, take a basic class, and rent some options to see what you like.

    As far as "not destroying much of your neighborhood": while there is ammo designed for low penetration, it tends to expensive and ineffective. The best remedy for overpenetration is training to hit what you aim at, be sure of your target, and your backstop.
     
    1 person likes this.
  10. Harold falcon

    Harold falcon Well-Known Member

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    Frangible bullets are San option if you're in an apartment complex or something like that. Personally, I am not a Fran. Hayward is right. Hit what you shoot at. You are responsible for every bullet that comes out of your firearm.
     
  11. 1911

    1911 Member

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    Glad this thread even exists here. I complained about NY state/NYC gun laws on another, unrelated thread and got quite the anti-gun pasting.
     
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  12. archetypal_yuppie

    archetypal_yuppie Well-Known Member

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    Once you master knife, go for strangulation. Then go for making them so depressed they kill themselves walking off cliffs.
     
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  13. 1911

    1911 Member

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    There's an outfit in Florida that does guided primitive weapons hunts for boar. I'm interested in going, too...
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2015
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  14. Harold falcon

    Harold falcon Well-Known Member

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    If I recall my history it was Davy Crockett who grinned a bear to death.
     
  15. Harold falcon

    Harold falcon Well-Known Member

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  16. Mauro

    Mauro Well-Known Member

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    My daughter has something similar same model different design.
     
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  17. Mauro

    Mauro Well-Known Member

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    What a wonderful weekend to shoot clays.
     
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  18. RRL100

    RRL100 Member

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    Recently moved to Oregon. Had to leave behind a Colt Detective Special and a Ruger Security Six 357 6" barrel.

    I want to buy a new gun. I want a manly gun. Cowboy style. The kind of gun Clint Eastwood would carry.

    Any suggestions?

    Same thing for a rifle.

    I want these 2 pieces to be heirloom guns.
     
  19. dcg

    dcg Well-Known Member

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    S&W 29?
     
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  20. JLibourel

    JLibourel Well-Known Member

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    What do you want the guns for? If you could make that more clear, many of us could give you better counsel on this topic. Why did you "have to leave behind" those two revolvers, both of which are appealing guns, and i am certain they are not proscribed by law in Oregon?

    A gun can become an heirloom either from high price, ornamentation and such or because it is a part of family history. For example, I have my great-grandfather's Winchester Model 1897 shotgun. He would take it with him when he went out in a buckboard to prospect in deserts of California more than a century ago. It was his sole gun and I presume intended for both hunting and defense. It has a 26-inch modified-choke barrel that makes it a pretty good compromise for both purposes. It is an heirloom to me although not an especially valuable gun.
     

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