1. Welcome to the new Styleforum!

    We hope you’re as excited as we are to hang out in the new place. There are more new features that we’ll announce in the near future, but for now we hope you’ll enjoy the new site.

    We are currently fine-tuning the forum for your browsing pleasure, so bear with any lingering dust as we work to make Styleforum even more awesome than it was.

    Oh, and don’t forget to head over to the Styleforum Journal, because we’re giving away two pairs of Carmina shoes to celebrate our move!

    Please address any questions about using the new forum to support@styleforum.net

    Cheers,

    The Styleforum Team

    Dismiss Notice

Guide to suit quality 1949

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by CrimsonSox, Nov 19, 2013.

  1. CrimsonSox

    CrimsonSox Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    396
    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2012
    This is a fascinating guide to the quality of different full-canvas suits, published in 1949 by the U.S. government. It also has a guide to fabrics on pages 6-7. Fused suits make no appearance in this volume. You can read the book here:

    http://books.google.com/books?id=rx...ce=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false

    Some interesting observations: hand-made buttonholes are often identified today by their rough appearance on the non-facing side. The guide points out that the best hand-made buttonholes should be finished smoothly on both sides (doubling the work and expense for the tailor).

    [​IMG]

    Not all canvases are made the same:

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    The quality of a coat front:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    For the rest of the book: http://books.google.com/books?id=rx...ce=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2013
    4 people like this.
  2. GBR

    GBR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,443
    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2006
    Why was the US Government involving itself in such things?
     
  3. CrimsonSox

    CrimsonSox Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    396
    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2012
  4. jrd617

    jrd617 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    14,543
    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2009
    

    Harry Truman was in office. Who happened to be a haberdasher and a fan of industrial policy. Coincidence? I think not.
     
    1 person likes this.
  5. Shirtmaven

    Shirtmaven Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,335
    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2003
    Location:
    NYC
    thank you for posting this.
    a very informative piece.

    who needs styleforum when youhave the US gov. giving you the facts
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. jrd617

    jrd617 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    14,543
    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2009
    I wonder how many makers on that tedious SF suit hierarchy have mid or low grade canvas. (Had no idea some could be cotton/burlap)
     
  7. vida

    vida Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    451
    Joined:
    May 6, 2010
    Location:
    right here, right now
    Very cool CrimSox...how did you come across this?

    jrd617: "I wonder how many makers on that tedious SF suit hierarchy have mid or low grade canvas. (Had no idea some could be cotton/burlap)"

    I would love to know this also. I recall Jeffrey d stating that some half canvassed suits are better than poorly made canvas versions. Just saying...
     
  8. CrimsonSox

    CrimsonSox Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    396
    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2012
    Thank you Carl. I've always enjoyed and learned from your posts on the art of the dress shirt, so I was happy to contribute something helpful.

    That's a good question Vida. I was trying to find out more about the quality of suits from the first half of the 20th century. A friend once commented that when he saw a Scholte suit from the 1930s, it was sewn incredibly finely, to a level that would be unheard of today. Foster & Son in their thread make a similar remark about how the density of the stitching in shoes was far higher a century ago. So that made me curious to learn more about the quality of suits from that time. It's surprisingly difficult to find sources on that question, but the book above was one of the first that turned up.

    A bit of inspiration -- hand-tailoring at Henry Poole during World War II:

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2013
  9. poorsod

    poorsod Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,057
    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2005
    Thanks for the link!

    You know the picture of the tailors sitting on the tables reminded me of a conversation I had with Rory Duffy. He mentioned that back in the old days, the boys stricken with polio would be trained as tailors so they could make a living. So it is possible that some tailor traditions, such as sitting on the table like that, arose from people who were unable to stand or walk.
     
    1 person likes this.
  10. Shirtmaven

    Shirtmaven Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,335
    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2003
    Location:
    NYC
    


    that is an interesting point.
    I knew of an English tailor who worked at Catania clothing at 85 fifth ave.(a building that was filled with tailors, clothing fatories, and rack jobbers of suits)
    John curran had one leg that was about 5" shorter then the other. He was the fastest tailor I have ever seen.
    fueled by coffee and cigarettes
    he could make a jacket in a day and a good one!!!,
     
  11. CrimsonSox

    CrimsonSox Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    396
    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2012
    It looks like tailors have been sitting cross-legged while sewing for some time. This is a painting from 1780:

    [​IMG]
     
  12. poorsod

    poorsod Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,057
    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2005
    There is a leg muscle called the sartorius muscle (ie the tailors muscle) because it is the muscle believed to let a person cross his legs. So the association between tailors and crossed legs must have been around for a long time.
     
  13. 12345Michael54321

    12345Michael54321 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,555
    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    Location:
    Baltimore County, Maryland, USA
    
    It seems somewhat unlikely. As has been noted, the tradition dates back centuries. Thing is, polio was a rare disease prior to the 20th century. (Indeed, the history of how polio went, almost overnight, from being a disease of virtually no significance to society, to one which frightened entire nations, is a fascinating one.) And of those few boys who were stricken with polio, only a fraction of 1% wound up unable to sit in a chair or on a bench or stool. (Chairs were enormously less common historically than were benches and stools.)

    It just seems like a bit of a reach to hypothesize that a tradition which can be reasonably explained in other ways, owes its origin to such limited factors.
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by