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Going into luxury/high-end stores with no intention of buying anything?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Bexcellence, Feb 4, 2013.

  1. biged781

    biged781 Well-Known Member

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    I don't know, but that would be a real dick move. So the SA who's not even working gets a commission? I would be pissed if I were the SA on duty... that's like tipping a waiter other than the one who served you for no good reason.
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2013
  2. JubeiSpiegel

    JubeiSpiegel Well-Known Member

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    My sincerity is true, i suppose any question of the sort would have made you suspicious. I honestly hate to trouble sales associates, as there is a certain level of justification involved in most of my purchases. As such, i can be tedious in deciding and researching my purchases.

    In any case, when the time does come, i do reward patience and kindness...
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2013
  3. JubeiSpiegel

    JubeiSpiegel Well-Known Member

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    If the initial SA that helped me did a good job, i try to stick with that SA. I have been known to call ahead, any good SA will make time for a loyal client, it's beneficial really.

    That said, on a whim, i have made purchases from stores when my SA was off. In those instance, i gladly let another SA help me.
     
  4. David Reeves

    David Reeves Well-Known Member

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    Stores aren't museums.....actually you have to pay to get into museums....Your wasting everyone's time including your own. Window shop, buy a magazine or look at stuff online.
     
  5. David Reeves

    David Reeves Well-Known Member

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    If you really have to do it;

    Industry code and etiquette is to walk into a store say good afternoon, morning etc to the sales associate straight away (before they do). Then ask directly if its "ok just to take a look round?" Whenever someone says this they are usually a buyer or designer, it's plain your unlikely to buy and assistants give you a deferential wide berth.
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2013
  6. Big Texas

    Big Texas Well-Known Member

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    I think there's a middle ground here. Stores aren't museums, but at the same time, they're not shotgun weddings to the merchandise. Sometimes you really do need a good look around to get a feel for the things you can't ascertain online or in magazines (nuances, texture, etc.).

    It's perfectly ok to browse the wares -- provided you are actually considering the possibility of buying something. If you're just there to dick around and feel up the merch, and you know you're not planning to buy anything in the near future, don't go into the store and waste their time. But if you're legitimately on the fence, or even just curious about checking out the goods in person before forming an opinion, it's fine to go in and check 'em out. You don't have to walk into a store with the intention to walk out with a purchase. But just don't make a regular habit of going in and coming out empty handed (unless you're Lafont, obviously). And it goes without saying, but definitely don't waste an SA's time and attention if you know you're not going to buy anything.

    FYI, most retailers in recent years have become especially guarded about "showrooming," i.e., checking out the goods in person, and later buying them online from Amazon (or wherever). It's a free country, I know. You're well within your rights to do it. But just be aware that store managers are going to be a little paranoid about it these days. And if there's a small, local menswear shop that you admire, consider giving them your business when you finally do pull the trigger.
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2013
  7. Steve Papas

    Steve Papas Well-Known Member

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    This is the most important point. These are people who are trying to make a living. By wasting their time you are depriving them of their living. By wasting their time, it does not mean you have to buy the product if you do not like it. It also does not mean you do not look at what other stores have to offer. If you do leave a store and want to "think about it", ask them for their card. Then when you do decide to buy that product ask for that sales associate. If you want to be super nice, phone up the store and ask to speak to the SA that helped you and ask him when he will be on duty to close out the sale.
     
  8. jeff13007

    jeff13007 Well-Known Member

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    The waiter analogy is really apples to oranges in this case. A better analogy would be a private banker with a client list. If he was on vacation/unavailable at the time when one of his clients needed to make a transaction someone else would do it for him as I'm sure he would for one of his colleges. SA's at high end places have their own client lists, and from my understanding they sometimes even bring clients when they move
     
  9. Dempsy444

    Dempsy444 Well-Known Member

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    The idea that it wouldn't be okay is appalling.
    Of course it's okay. One should put a sales person in their place if they try an attitude like that. While one should always be sensitive to never exploit a professionals time, like meeting with a tailor to get his advice but with no intention of using him, high end stores do not involve professional time, but merely location. The whole purpose is to browse. A sales person is free to spend their time as they wish. The relationship is between the store and the customer. The sales person is merely a tool the customer chooses to use or not.
     
  10. Loathing

    Loathing Well-Known Member

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    London
    Make sure to avoid
    wasting the time
    of shopkeepers if
    the shop is small
    and independent.
    This would be
    morally reprehensible.

    Make sure to waste
    the time of shop
    assistants if the
    shop is a corporate
    behemoth.
    This would be
    morally commendable.
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2013
    1 person likes this.
  11. JLibourel

    JLibourel Well-Known Member

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    Aug 7, 2004
    As far as "wasting a sales associate's time," bear in mind that a lot of the SA's time is spent just standing around. I did work one summer selling menswear, so I have a little experience in this matter, even if it was almost 54 years ago!

    I don't think browsing around and chatting with an SA is reprehensible if you do it at a "slow time" when very few people are in the store. If an SA devotes a fair amount of time assisting you, I think it is gracious to make at least a minor purchase--necktie, pocket square, something like that. When I have been trying on shoes to check lasts, I always buy some polish, spare laces or such to compensate the SA somewhat for his trouble.

    As to the guy who said that his Ferragamos started falling apart in three weeks, that sure hasn't been my experience. I have three pairs of Ferragamos. Two pairs were purchased in 2000, one in 2003. All of them seem about as good as new. (Admittedly, I have a pretty large shoe rotation.)
     

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