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General Bike Thread (Desiderata, questions, porn)

Discussion in 'Health & Body' started by kronik, Apr 30, 2009.

  1. otc

    otc Well-Known Member

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    Do any of you guys use "no nose" or "split nose" seats? I hate the numbness associated with a ride and then I read this NY Times Article about these seats.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/28/science/28tier.html


    I think getting a saddle that fits your form and adjusting it properly is key.

    You shouldn't really be riding on your cock in a normal saddle...you should be riding on your sit bones. Different models of seat have different widths/lengths/profiles and with the right adjustment you should be fine.

    Of course, from the number of people I see riding around on the lakefront with all sorts of abominations of bike fit (like the people who ride on top of bar ends that are turned facing inwards above the bars), I would imagine that most people who complain about issues don't care to put the effort into fit (since just getting a new stem or some riser bars should cost almost the same as some gigantor bar ends).
     
  2. acidboy

    acidboy Well-Known Member

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    I know an older russian gentleman here who uses a saddle like that, and frankly they look weird. I suppose if you're the type that doesn't move much while on the saddle its fine, also if you don't mind the stares when people look at it [​IMG] I myself move a lot when on the saddle so I don't think this would work for me.
     
  3. DNW

    DNW Well-Known Member

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    Recession, Baby
    When installing your own pedals, how important is it that one acutally put grease of the threads before installing? Is my only risk that i won't be able to back the pedal back out if/when I want a new one?

    No need to. The pedals are designed so that every stroke tightens the grip. Unless you pedal backward, all the time...I wouldn't worry about it.
     
  4. zippyh

    zippyh Well-Known Member

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    Seattle-ish
    When installing your own pedals, how important is it that one acutally put grease of the threads before installing? Is my only risk that i won't be able to back the pedal back out if/when I want a new one?

    It's such a minor effort to put grease on the threads, why wouldn't you?

    If you've ever tried to remove a seized pedal bolt, you wouldn't even ask the question.
    Plus the grease helps eliminate irritating creaking noises.
     
  5. Pinhas

    Pinhas Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    NYC
    Just bought my first fixie; Bianchi Pista Nero. Been riding for a week or so and I have to say that I really like it. Took a while to get used to it but once you get the control and stopping covered its a smooth ride.

    Changed the bar to bull horn and will soon get a Brooks B17 saddle. Will post pics later on.
     
  6. BoomDiggs

    BoomDiggs Well-Known Member

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    Apr 5, 2009
    It's such a minor effort to put grease on the threads, why wouldn't you?

    For no other reason than to avoid running to the hardware store to buy the grease, and then having a tube of grease laying around that I will likely never use again.
     
  7. otc

    otc Well-Known Member

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    For no other reason than to avoid running to the hardware store to buy the grease, and then having a tube of grease laying around that I will likely never use again.

    You can use pretty much anything...you just don't want to put them on dry. Thicker is better so maybe not WD40 but you could put some canola oil or vaseline in there and it would be enough to stop it all from seizing.

    I've used chain lube (probably boeshield T9 at the time) without issue on bikes...although I can think of worse things than having a tube of grease laying around. You don't even need bike specific grease...a tub of bearing grease from the hardware store would be fine.
     
  8. venessian

    venessian Well-Known Member

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    Sò più de eà che de qua.
    I think getting a saddle that fits your form and adjusting it properly is key. You shouldn't really be riding on your cock in a normal saddle...you should be riding on your sit bones. Different models of seat have different widths/lengths/profiles and with the right adjustment you should be fine. Of course, from the number of people I see riding around on the lakefront with all sorts of abominations of bike fit (like the people who ride on top of bar ends that are turned facing inwards above the bars), I would imagine that most people who complain about issues don't care to put the effort into fit (since just getting a new stem or some riser bars should cost almost the same as some gigantor bar ends).
    This. The importance of correct fit cannot be over-emphasized. Finding the correct saddle is really a task, but a necessary one. I tried various cut-out (not nose-less) saddles and personally found them very uncomfortable. Others love them. I think those nose-less saddles might work for always-upright positions (I see that various Police Depts use them), but I doubt they accomodate a variety of normal riding positions. I don't see rec or advanced road or mtb riders on them, and I don't really buy the hype when the people who ride 20,000 or 30,000 km/year, for a living, ride standard saddles that fit them. Armstrong's saddle is a model from ~30 years ago.
    That gives me a great reason to ride my bike to the hardware store to buy the grease, and then I'll have a tube of grease laying around that I will have on hand whenever I need it again.
    FTFY. [​IMG]
     
  9. velobran

    velobran Well-Known Member

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    Fort Lauderdale
    Do any of you guys use "no nose" or "split nose" seats? I hate the numbness associated with a ride and then I read this NY Times Article about these seats.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/28/science/28tier.html


    This might be fine for putzing around on a cruiser, but try to take a hard corner with speed on a road bike without a saddle between your legs. You're going to lose, the ground will win.

    This comes back every few years or so. People think those small thin saddles must do damage ... if you are sitting correctly on the saddle (seat bones supported) you should have have any issues. Also - move around a bit on the saddle and get off your ass to pedal every now and then.
     
  10. zippyh

    zippyh Well-Known Member

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    Seattle-ish
    Out for a ride last weekend and watched a balloon landing.
    [​IMG]
     
  11. acidboy

    acidboy Well-Known Member

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    ok so this is the first time that happened to me and I was just wondering... I biked sunday morning for maybe around 35 miles mostly up mountain roads, and up till monday the sole of my left foot, the area below the smaller toes, was sore and was wondering what caused this. I usually keep my left foot straight when I freewheel so I don't know if my body weight was a factor, and I stuck with the crank's mid ring even during the climbs instead of taking it easy using the granny gear. the position of the cleats on the shoes are pretty much in the middle, fwiw. oh- I use shimano spd's.
     
  12. Sir Humphrey Appleby

    Sir Humphrey Appleby Well-Known Member

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    ok so this is the first time that happened to me and I was just wondering... I biked sunday morning for maybe around 35 miles mostly up mountain roads, and up till monday the sole of my left foot, the area below the smaller toes, was sore and was wondering what caused this. I usually keep my left foot straight when I freewheel so I don't know if my body weight was a factor, and I stuck with the crank's mid ring even during the climbs instead of taking it easy using the granny gear. the position of the cleats on the shoes are pretty much in the middle, fwiw. oh- I use shimano spd's.

    Do you pull the pedals up or just push them down? If you push down on the pedals hard you can get a bit sore especially if you're not used to the pedals (that or I just learned not to do it).
     
  13. acidboy

    acidboy Well-Known Member

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    ^ both, but lately I've been pedaling uphills with my heels down, fwiw, to put more power into it.
     
  14. Sir Humphrey Appleby

    Sir Humphrey Appleby Well-Known Member

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    ^ both, but lately I've been pedaling uphills with my heels down, fwiw, to put more power into it.

    I mean do you pull the pedals all the way round or just exert on the downstroke?
     
  15. acidboy

    acidboy Well-Known Member

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    all the way around
     
  16. SUPER K

    SUPER K Well-Known Member

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    Jul 14, 2004
    like you're trying to scrap mud off the bottom of your shoe.

    Anybody remember those powercranks? Used to tear me up, but did force me to be efficient
     
  17. shibbel

    shibbel Well-Known Member

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    huh?
    Ended up picking this up, and a cheap mountain bike (trek marlin) rather than spend all my $ on a hybrid. I added a Cateye comp, and Shimano SPD pedals. [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  18. Minarchist

    Minarchist Well-Known Member

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    Jun 9, 2011
    Location:
    Nashvegas, TN
    ok so this is the first time that happened to me and I was just wondering... I biked sunday morning for maybe around 35 miles mostly up mountain roads, and up till monday the sole of my left foot, the area below the smaller toes, was sore and was wondering what caused this. I usually keep my left foot straight when I freewheel so I don't know if my body weight was a factor, and I stuck with the crank's mid ring even during the climbs instead of taking it easy using the granny gear. the position of the cleats on the shoes are pretty much in the middle, fwiw. oh- I use shimano spd's.
    How well have you had the bike fitted? Have you ever done a full fitting, when you're riding for a computer and cameras to see if you have any knee-pull, steady pedal stroke, etc.? Is this a pretty common length of ride and level of exertion, or do you rarely push yourself this hard? Also, are these new shoes and/or cleats?

    The answer to those will probably determine what is causing it, but you may have a bit of a lean either in your knee or on your foot that direction. The foot is easy to correct -- there are wedge-style spacers that can correct any pedal discrepancies left to right. The knee is more about concentration.
     
  19. Sir Humphrey Appleby

    Sir Humphrey Appleby Well-Known Member

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  20. rdawson808

    rdawson808 Well-Known Member

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    The Capital
    oh for crying out loud...tried to change my pedals but my wrench that I'd used in the past wouldn't fit. Asked two friends to borrow theirs, but they forgot day after day. So I bought one. Seized? Crap. WD-40 and let them sit--no luck. And I stripped the spindle a little. Tried a hex wrench from the back with no luck either. Had to take it to the shop today and they had to keep it to disassemble the pedal. So I grabbed a bus most of the way home. Missed the second bus by seconds and had to walk a half mile home in my bike shoes. Ugh.

    And the bike is making some atrocious noise when I"\\mm up out of the saddle. I thought it was just chain slap, but it seems way too loud and metallic sounding. And now it's happening starting to happen when I'm just starting from a full stop.

    b
     

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