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FOR DO IT YOURSELFERS GETTING THAT TROUSER LENGTH RIGHT

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by a tailor, Aug 28, 2012.

  1. a tailor

    a tailor Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,852
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2006
    Location:
    chicago suburbs
    First reading is getting the length right #1. Here is #2.
    Only one chalk mark is placed to mark the length.
    I prefer to place it on the right front crease.
    A ruler is placed on end on the floor and against the back of the right leg.
    A chalk mark is made at the top of the ruler and on one leg, then on the other leg.
    On the work table, lay the trouser flat on its right side pocket and side seam.
    The left leg then lies evenly on top of the right.
    Flip the lower part of the leg back on itself enough to give you space to work on
    the right side. Now that right front crease should lie on the table and facing you.
    You should see the length chalk mark now. Place your ruler on the length mark
    and have the ruler lie squarely across the inseam. Now pivot on the length mark
    and lower the ruler at the back crease about a half inch. Thats the angle of your
    plain hem. Now chalk a line there.Transfer the two ends of the line to the other side
    of the leg, and chalk a line between.
    Now lay the two legs down together left on top as before. The two creases together
    as well as the two inseams. Now check the chalk marks on the back of the legs.
    If they are together the legs are even. If they are apart lets say left is higher , that
    means the left is lower. Now slide the left leg down to make marks even.
    Now transfer the hem lines to the left leg
    This is when you allow for the hem to turn inside, and then cut off the excess cloth.
    The process is the same for cuffs.
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2013
  2. unclesam099

    unclesam099 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    466
    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2010
    Location:
    SE PA, USA
    Thank you for your explanation! I will take photos, attach them here, and have you check the process - I am not clear about marking on front crease. Do I fold material under and mark at top of the shoe when it looks right? Then I mark the back so as to measure for differences? Please help me understand.

    Your knowledge is very much appreciated!
     
  3. a tailor

    a tailor Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,852
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2006
    Location:
    chicago suburbs
    Thank you for your explanation! I will take photos, attach them here, and have you check the process - I am not clear about marking on front crease. Do I fold material under and mark at top of the shoe when it looks right? Then I mark the back so as to measure for differences? Please help me understand.
    Your knowledge is very much appreciated![/quote

    The excess cloth is turned under so that you looking in a mirror can see exactly how the finished hem will appear..
    The chalk is marked at the point that the crease touches the shoe. As a safety, i usually add 1/4" for shrinkage.
    That 1/4" will cause a break in the crease until the dry cleaning.
     
  4. sm31

    sm31 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    232
    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2010
    

    That'd be great.
     
    1 person likes this.

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