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Foo shops for a Japanese knife

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by mafoofan, Jan 21, 2013.

  1. chogall

    chogall Well-Known Member

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    Super fine grit sharpening, at micro level roughness. Apply paste to fine surface and sharpen away. Chromium is even more fine at 0.5 micron.
     
  2. iamacyborg

    iamacyborg Well-Known Member

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    Deba's are about twice as thick as standard Gyutos, not too sure about the hardness, but should be okay for the stuff I want to do.

    Look at this as an example. http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/HDSeries.html#HD Western Deba
     
  3. Manton

    Manton Well-Known Member

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  4. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Well-Known Member

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    What do you guys want to do with these? For fish, the single beveled ones are the way to go, but as chogall said, those are basically big knives with sharp, thin edges, and for hacking bones, a cleaver is a much better solution, as the edges on these will only hold up to limited punishment. These are just really heavy chef knives, which make sense as an addition to a delicate one for cracking lobster claws and whatnot.
     
  5. iamacyborg

    iamacyborg Well-Known Member

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  6. Manton

    Manton Well-Known Member

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    I doubt my ability to use a single bevel deba properly.

    Anyway, you have a western deba, so why are you trying to discourage me?
     
  7. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Well-Known Member

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    Because I never use it except to crack lobster claws or to chop large amounts of parsley.
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2013
  8. Manton

    Manton Well-Known Member

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    why would you need that heavy knife for parsely?

    I unhappy with my current round fish knife options. I suppose I could just get the 7" mac filet knife. I do have a cleaver so maybe there is no need for a deba. I don't break down really big fish. 90% of the whole fish that buy are black bass and red snapper, not that big by any means.
     
  9. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Well-Known Member

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    I don't need it for chopping parsley, it just has a shape that seems to rock nicely. I agree that flexible fillet knives suck. No question about that in my mind. I'd suggest getting a deba, but not a western one. The single bevel ones are purpose built to fillet fish, and you would need to learn that technique anyway if you were using a western one, it would just be harder to do.
     
  10. lordjeebus

    lordjeebus Well-Known Member

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    I like Western Debas for poultry (and lobsters). Far from essential.
     
  11. Zachgranstrom

    Zachgranstrom Well-Known Member

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  12. foodguy

    foodguy Well-Known Member

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    pretty, but despite being called a gyutou, that looks a lot more like a slicer (yaganiba?). would be good for some things, but not a general tool.
     
  13. Zachgranstrom

    Zachgranstrom Well-Known Member

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    You're probably right, but I make do with it. :D
     
  14. Bounder

    Bounder Well-Known Member

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    All of this talk of left-handed, single-bevel sashimi knives sharpened with diamond dust is all very well but what sort of cutting surface are you using? I assume that there is probably some international treaty requiring the use of bamboo for all these super-high-end Japanese knives but I am looking to upgrade my cutting boards from wood and plastic for more ordinary stuff. The contending surfaces seem to be bamboo, Sani-TUFF or Remaindered Skate Board Park.

    Are any of these better than wood and plastic? I kind of like the last one, Epicurean, but I am a sucker for this sort of thing. Does anyone have any experience with their surface?
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2013
  15. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Well-Known Member

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    The epicurean is awful, imo. Very hard. Sanituff is fine. Wood is fine. Bamboo is shit. Too hard.
     
  16. otc

    otc Well-Known Member

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    I don't have matt's experience, but I like my big epicurean board a lot (although they have several different lines now...mine was whatever was available a few years ago).

    I too think that bamboo feels too hard. I haven't seen any studies to say this, but I felt like it was dulling blades.
     
  17. chogall

    chogall Well-Known Member

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    End grain is the best.

    Long grain is fine.

    Plastic will have contamination problems and all those design junk is for decor. Bamboo is to hard.
     
  18. iamacyborg

    iamacyborg Well-Known Member

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    Plastic is fine, it's what they use in professional kitchens.
     
    1 person likes this.
  19. b1os

    b1os Well-Known Member

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    Sani-Tuffs strike me as very expensive. I've got some wholesale plastic/rubber boards that were a quarter of the price. However, they scratch very easily. The Sani-Tuffs apparently do so too, but maybe to a lesser extent.
     
  20. Manton

    Manton Well-Known Member

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    Boos block end grain maple.

    For meat, something cheap that can go in the dish washer.
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2013

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