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Favorite Vodkas?

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by drizzt3117, Nov 16, 2004.

  1. JFK

    JFK Well-Known Member

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    It used to be Ketel One, Grey Goose, or Belvedere; now it's Hangar One. By far. And if you're interested in infused vodkas, look no further; this guy does the most amazing stuff with the most unusual fruits. You can buy some online at  http://www.caddellwilliams.com/hangarvodka_main.html (And no, I don't have any financial interest in Hangar One; I just think the guy that makes it puts out an amazing product.)
     
  2. ken

    ken Well-Known Member

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    Try cutting up a few fresh, raw, peeled horse radish slices and letting them sit in a bottle of vodka for a couple days. Then drink it straight, no ice. Delicious (-ly intoxicating).
     
  3. j

    j Well-Known Member

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    That's making my sinuses open up just thinking about it. Mmmm.. prime rib... and vodka...
     
  4. globetrotter

    globetrotter Well-Known Member

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    in Russia one very common way of drinking vodka is straight, very very cold, while eating very fatty salamis and hams with a very strong mustard. I have spent a few very long nights that way, the fatty meat helps keep you from getting too drunk too quickly, and the vodka works well with the flavors.
     
  5. j

    j Well-Known Member

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    I have a menu brought back for me from a Russian tea room with vodka ritual instructions on it. They include taking a big sniff of some dark bread or something. I'll have to dig that out.

    Speaking of vodka service, does anyone else have a vodka set? I got a pretty cheap one with tube shaped glasses with wide heavy bases and a bowl to hold ice water with the tubes in it. Tried it once, it definitely works.
     
  6. globetrotter

    globetrotter Well-Known Member

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    I haven't seen that. what I usually do is mix ice and salt in a bowl to get very cold sludge, and then take my vodka from the freezer and put it in the bowl. I thin serve from the bottle, as needed.
     
  7. j

    j Well-Known Member

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    Here's the one I have. Got it at Marshalls for maybe 10 bucks. It's definitely not worth $40, but it's reasonably nice.
     
  8. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Well-Known Member

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    I generally just throw the bottle in the freezer a bit before planning to consume [​IMG] globetrotter, the regimine that you mentioned seems guaranteed to give you a monster hangover the next morning, afternoon....evening? When I was in Prague last year, me and a couple buddies went to Karlovy Lazne (not sure if you guys know this club, but it's enormous, if kinda ghetto) and one of my buddies smuggled in a bottle of Wybrowya (polish vodka, expensive in the US, cheap as hell in CZ) The Czechs have an energy drink called Semtex that's kinda similar to Red Bull, but much more powerful... Alternating shots of absinth (straight up, no wussy sugar) and Semtex/Vodkas is guaranteed to leave you barely in the land of the living the next day...
     
  9. globetrotter

    globetrotter Well-Known Member

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    drzzt, I am at a point in my life where every time I drink more than a couple of drinks, I am supprised at the level of the hangover, so I don't know if that is worse of not that other ways of drinking, but the mixture of salty fat meat and alchohol can't be good for a hangover, thinking about it logically. at my brother's wedding, when I was 19 and could run a marathon in boots (and I am talking literally here) I drank pitcher after pitcher whiskey sours and was up at 10 am the following morning for brunch (after sleeping the night dressed in a tuxedo in the shower stall of my motel room) and people couldn't believe it. now, a night of drinking with customers and I am shaky in the morning. such is life.
     
  10. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Well-Known Member

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    well, that means you're not drinking yourself to death with your high tolerance. I haven't been drinking to the extent that I was while in Europe or Asia either, which is probably a good thing [​IMG]
     
  11. Cesare

    Cesare Member

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    My favorite vodka is Russky Standart. Hands down the best Vodka i have tried. It was recommended to me by all my Russian friends. It's all they ever drink [​IMG]
     
  12. nightowl6261a

    nightowl6261a Well-Known Member

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    Great Vodka my wife says, she like Charodei, as well as Kutskova, Sobieski, Chopin, The Jewel of Russia, Belvedere, Stoli, just about any expensive fruit but try Youri Dolgoruki, she claims it is the best, personally I would rather wrap my indulgences in a rare Irish Whiskey called Middleton Very Rare, if one has not tried this, get a bottle if you can find it, to die for. We must start a review on Whiskeys.
     
  13. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Well-Known Member

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    Too bad Russky Standart is almost impossible to get in the US... globetrotter, forgot to mention that one, bring some back. [​IMG]
     
  14. globetrotter

    globetrotter Well-Known Member

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    I'll keep my eyes open for it.
     
  15. Horace

    Horace Well-Known Member

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    I've seen it for sale in the US. But yes, almost impossible to find here. I'd be interested to know who has found it in the US, and in what State of the Union, and for what price. Thanks. H
     
  16. globetrotter

    globetrotter Well-Known Member

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    interesting article in the times:



    T was not exactly a victory for the underdog, but chalk it up as a triumph of the unexpected.

    The idea for the Dining section's tasting panel was to sample a range of the new high-end unflavored vodkas that have come on the market in the last few years in their beautifully designed bottles and to compare them with a selection of established super-premium brands. To broaden the comparison, or possibly as a bit of mischief, our tasting coordinator, Bernard Kirsch, added to our blind tasting a bottle of Smirnoff, the single best-selling unflavored vodka in the United States, but a definite step down in status, marketing and bottle design.

    Advertisement




    After the 21 vodkas were sipped and the results compiled, the Smirnoff was our hands-down favorite.

    Shocking? Perhaps. Delving into the world of vodka reveals a spirit unlike almost any other, with standards that make judging it substantially different from evaluating wine, beer, whiskey or even root beer. A malt whiskey should be distinctive, singular. The same goes for a Burgundy or a Belgian ale. But vodka? Vodka is measured by its purity, by an almost Platonic neutrality that makes tasting it more akin to tasting bottled waters, or snowflakes.

    Yet in just a few decades vodka has become the most popular spirit in the country. It is now the default liquor in cocktails once made with gin, and with its glossy merchandising it has set a marketing standard for high-end spirits that the other liquors are all struggling to emulate. It's quite an achievement for something that the government defines as "neutral spirits, so distilled, or so treated after distillation with charcoal or other materials, as to be without distinctive character, aroma, taste or color."

    A lack of distinctiveness is a separate matter from a lack of distinction. The vodkas we tasted had character and their own flavors and aromas, even though the differences among them were often subtle and difficult to articulate.

    "I'm looking for interest," said Eben Klemm, a cocktail expert who joined me for the tasting, along with my colleagues Florence Fabricant and William L. Hamilton, who writes the Shaken and Stirred column for the Sunday Styles section. "Some were so unique that they stood out," he added, "while others were pure, simple and austere."

    Mr. Klemm, whose heady title is director of cocktail development for B. R. Guest, a restaurant group that includes Dos Caminos, Fiamma and Vento in New York, found himself torn in two directions in assessing the vodkas. Because we tasted them straight, he judged them as solo beverages yet could not help extrapolating how they would taste in cocktails, which are overwhelmingly the vehicle for consuming vodka.

    Mr. Hamilton, too, wondered whether his perceptions might change. "When deployed in mixed drinks, these slight flavor profiles that I enjoyed might cause trouble," he said.

    Ms. Fabricant, on the other hand, dismissed such existential issues. "Go with the flow," she suggested, adding that the qualities she sought in the vodkas included elegance, neutrality and balance. "As a vodka drinker who likes vodka on the rocks, I picked out what I would want to drink," she said.

    I'm not much of a vodka drinker myself, although I do like a good bloody mary. I prefer gin in classic gin drinks like martinis and gimlets that have largely evolved into vodka cocktails. But I appreciate the purity and depth of a fine vodka. Those I liked best were all smooth rather than harsh, and balanced and harmonious rather than burdened by alcoholic heat. They had a presence in the mouth that we sometimes referred to as texture or substance.

    That being said, at the end of our tasting it was Smirnoff at the top of our list, ahead of many other names that are no doubt of higher status in stylish bars and lounges. Some of those names did not even make our Top 10. Grey Goose from France, one of the most popular vodkas, was felt to lack balance and seemed to have more than a touch of sweetness. Ketel One from the Netherlands, another top name, was felt to be routine and sharp, although Mr. Klemm did describe it as "a good mixer."
     
  17. chorse123

    chorse123 Well-Known Member

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  18. Fabienne

    Fabienne Well-Known Member

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    That's pretty much what a Russian friend of mine says. He always has Smirnoff in his freezer. He frowns when anybody mentions flavored vodkas. I still remember when he initiated me to vodka drinking. Here I am, trying to taste it as though it were wine. He ordered: drink it all at once, then eat a pickle. [​IMG] I'm back to my Gevrey Chambertin.
     
  19. globetrotter

    globetrotter Well-Known Member

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    (chorse123 @ Jan. 27 2005,11:19) The rest of Globetrotter's article can be found here: http://www.nytimes.com/2005....sition=
    That's pretty much what a Russian friend of mine says. Â He always has Smirnoff in his freezer. Â He frowns when anybody mentions flavored vodkas. Â I still remember when he initiated me to vodka drinking. Â Here I am, trying to taste it as though it were wine. Â He ordered: drink it all at once, then eat a pickle. Â [​IMG] I'm back to my Gevrey Chambertin.
    same thing, except instead of the pickle was some sausage. I keep a bottle of 5 dollar polish vodka in my freezer that has a great oily texture when cold.
     
  20. Fabienne

    Fabienne Well-Known Member

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    I "learnt" the tasting thing from my dad. When I was a kid, he loved getting out the warm bottles of Polish vodka from our trip there to impress guests by the potency. He would sip his one shot glass for the whole time the aperitif lasted. He has no excuse. Both his parents were Polish . [​IMG]
     

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