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ExperienceWith Prep Schools?? (Part 2)

Discussion in 'Business, Careers & Education' started by HEARTLESS-531, Jun 25, 2011.

  1. kicno10

    kicno10 Member

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    I came from a public HS in New England and now attend an Ivy League school. All I can say is that my public school background put me at a huuuuge disadvantage going into my freshman year. Academically I was behind many of my peers (and trust me, at my highschool, 300ish people per grade) I was easily the smartest person. Prep schools transition you into the college experience much better than Public schools. You get the chance to live away from home, be more independent and learn valuable skills like time Management. Attending prep school would have had a profound effect on my freshman year experience at college. That being said, it is very fulfilling to be able to call yourself a "public school kid" and know that you got in entirely based on merit rather than being one of the 30-40 people from Andover that get into every Ivy League school.
     
  2. RSS

    RSS Well-Known Member

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    Fulfilling in what way?
     
  3. Valor

    Valor Well-Known Member

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    Just by sheer volume the smartest and dumbest kids at any ivy are going to be public school kids. The prep school kids from elite prep schools are definitely above average but then again the average is always pretty mediocre given the way recruiting works.
     
  4. Cashmoney

    Cashmoney Well-Known Member

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    My dad was an Army officer. Brother and I attended crappy Army schools in Germany and Italy (Army schools = big city ghetto schools) before parents sent us to prep school. Andover for me and Exeter for my brother.

    I experienced amazing culture shock. Andover was sinf or swim. My classmates were, for the most part, smart. Only dumbasses on campus were the PG year jocks being groomed for Ivy football and hockey teams. I got clobbered by how fast classes moved, by how difficult the tests were. I'd been a straight A student who wrote papers and studied for tests on the morning school bus ride. If I didn't turn something in on time, teachers accepted my excuses.

    Now I was at a place that didn't coddle or hand-hold or accept excuses. If you copped an attitude or acted like an ass, Andover might well ask you not to return for the next term. I was in classes with 8-10 students, all smart and prepared. I nearly flunked out before gaining my footing. I needed an entire first term to learn how to study, how to take notes, how to write a sentence, then a paragraph, and finally an entire essay. Brother had similar experience at Exeter.

    Andover provided me with a first-rate education. It forced me to grow up and stand on my own feet. If nothing else, it made college a breeze. Made some amazing friends. (Amazing how often the New York Times mentions my classmates. I recall reading that a guy in my dorm during senior year had inherited a billion dollars.)

    The downside: I was clueless when I arrived at college. I'd gone to debutante parties and crap like that but I'd never had a girlfriend or even been on a date. (I'd managed to get laid but not at Andover.) I didn't own a car and barely knew how to drive. Knew more than was good for me about drugs and drinking. Andover was a school were students invited one another to cocktail hours before dinner. It wasn't until I got to Wall Street that I saw as much cocaine as I'd seen years before at Andover.

    There was lots I disliked about the place. But I was a teenager and had my issues. Most of what I disliked about prep school probably had more to do with me. I would have been just as unhappy had I stayed at that Army school in Italy. So I don't blame Andover for anything.

    And I generally had a good time.
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2011
  5. RSS

    RSS Well-Known Member

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    I was very clued in when I arrived at college. From my point of view, college was a slightly more independent version of prep school. I certainly knew lots of other students. On the other hand, classes were often a bit larger ... until I got to grad school.
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2011
  6. Cashmoney

    Cashmoney Well-Known Member

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    i meant socially clueless. academically, college was much less work/less stress than prep school because i knew how to be a top-notch student.

    but i needed a full semester to figure out social life at college -- and i have pretty good social skills. it took time for prep school to wear off.
     

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