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Eating cheese

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by mgm9128, Jul 11, 2011.

  1. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Well-Known Member

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    The wild and the pure.
    

    I wonder if the people who work there are as offensive as the ones in SF. I agree, not my favorite cheeses, but very easy to eat, so they are good for large groups.
     
  2. mordecai

    mordecai Well-Known Member

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    I used to get them at Whole Foods but we brought home an offensive Red Hawk once, so I haven't really gotten any since then. I don't know if LA has a Cowgirl shop, though we have no shortage of offensive retail niche experts.
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2011
  3. KJT

    KJT Well-Known Member

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    Please elaborate. Love the stories about SF.
     
  4. mordecai

    mordecai Well-Known Member

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    BTW, I think I've posted it before, but I really like this Belgian cheese:

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2011
  5. Huntsman

    Huntsman Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]


    With a really good bread, the only thing on God's green earth that I like more and some wonderful salted butter is a cheese called Brillat-Savarin. It should be pretty ubiquitous. I love it to death, the creaminess is captivating.

    For blue, I second the recomendation for Point Reyes, What I love about it is that though the moldy bit is funky, the white cheesy part (I swear, if there are names for these parts of cheese, school me) is so....white. That is, it is creamy and fresh and an excellent counterpoint to the funk--so unlike, say, a Stilton, that is funk on funk (and also excellent, but a different experience).

    You must also be able to find a good aged Manchego -- a semihard aged sheep's milk cheese. It has pockets that have begun to crystallize (what is that called?) like a parmagiano-reggiano, but not quite, and it is piquant and salty like a Pecorino.

    And then there is Mimolette, the orange softball. The thing about Mimollette is the unctuous waxy texture, the way the fats melt on your tongue, trapping the Doritos-like flavor and binding it to your receptors to send zings of deep cheesyness to your mind.

    Dammit, I need some cheese.

    BTW, can anyone rec a good cheese book?

    ~ H
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2011
  6. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Well-Known Member

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    Knee deep in curds
    Cowgirl is doing incredible things for the business of cheese on the artisan level (meaning the visibility, Culture magazine, encouraging artisans to get into business etc) but I find too often their cheeses are sold too young.

    And if you want to permanently turn off a room full of novice cheese tasters, open up a Red Hawk. ;)
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2011

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