1. Welcome to the new Styleforum!

    We hope you’re as excited as we are to hang out in the new place. There are more new features that we’ll announce in the near future, but for now we hope you’ll enjoy the new site.

    We are currently fine-tuning the forum for your browsing pleasure, so bear with any lingering dust as we work to make Styleforum even more awesome than it was.

    Oh, and don’t forget to head over to the Styleforum Journal, because we’re giving away two pairs of Carmina shoes to celebrate our move!

    Please address any questions about using the new forum to support@styleforum.net

    Cheers,

    The Styleforum Team

    Dismiss Notice

Do you know martial art? What kind? What Level?

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Soph, Aug 7, 2006.

  1. skalogre

    skalogre Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,324
    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2006
    Its hard to hit with a stick (or sword for that matter), which is why I usually win stick/sword/baseball bat/shishkabob fights.

    I don't know what the hell sort of establishments you frequent Slim where this occurs but I'll be damned, I want some pics [​IMG]
     
  2. mizanation

    mizanation Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    927
    Joined:
    May 8, 2006
    Cool thanks for the explanations. I think I will look into both... also thanks for the Houston links.

    no problem, man. i hope you find something that you will enjoy and do for a long time. houston is a pretty good place to train for boxing, mma and bjj, so consider yourself lucky.
     
  3. poly800rock

    poly800rock Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,435
    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2006
    Location:
    NYC
    at a younger age, i rose pretty fast in rank in tae kwon do. I found it very easy at a young age b/c of flexibility, speed, etc. and was able to beat people everytime at matches and its gotten me out of a bunch of fights later on.
     
  4. mizanation

    mizanation Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    927
    Joined:
    May 8, 2006
  5. skalogre

    skalogre Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,324
    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2006
    some of us might not know what skalogre is talking about when he mentions kendo. here is a documentary which shows a little bit about kendo:

    part 1:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ncDBi...elated&search=

    part 2:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pPW7B...elated&search=

    part 3:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4oKSJ...elated&search=

    part 4:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LaBKD...elated&search=

    part 5:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UiNZu...elated&search=



    Woah, good find mizanation! I had seen that a few years ago, I hope that somewhow I'll find a good quality copy somewhere - preferably without the Korean subtitles over the english subtitles!
     
  6. mizanation

    mizanation Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    927
    Joined:
    May 8, 2006
    yeah, the subtitles were annoying. if you need translation of certain sections, i can help you out. but still, great stuff.
     
  7. cmrocks

    cmrocks Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    639
    Joined:
    May 3, 2006
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    I haven't read this thread yet so I don't know what has been said yet. I just want to add a few things.

    I trained in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and Muay Thai for about 3 years (had to stop due to injury) at a club that was very serious. They have several guys who compete in King of the Cage and do very well. With that being said, I would recommend Muay Thai as the martial art to take. It will teach you almost everything you need to know. Low kicks are really valuable and I can't count the number of times I've kicked someone, who doesn't fight, in the legs only to have them drop both their hands as a reaction leaving themselves wide open. Also, you can usually kick someone from outside their punching range. The other thing Thai fighting teachs you is the clinch. A lot of fights end up with one person hanging onto the other one. From here, you can throw some knees and do some serious damage.

    The thing I found that makes Muay Thai so effective is that it is fairly simple. You learn the basic punches, kicks, knees, elbows, defenses etc then drill them and condition your body until they become effective.

    I would stay away from ground fighting unless you want to compete in martial arts. Ground fighting is great, don't get me wrong, it's fun, a great workout and you can really dominate someone who doesn't know what they are doing; however, the ground is the last place you want to be in a street fight. You can get stabbed easier, stomped on etc.

    Hope that helps.
     
  8. mizanation

    mizanation Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    927
    Joined:
    May 8, 2006
    totally agree.

    Muay Thai + BJJ is probably all you really need for hand-to-hand.

    Muay Thai for the reasons you listed.

    I also agree that you don't want to be on the ground in a street fight, however, a lot of times the fight ends up on the ground whether you want it to or not. If you want to bring the fight back to standing, you will need to know ground technique to get back up.
     
  9. cmrocks

    cmrocks Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    639
    Joined:
    May 3, 2006
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC

    I also agree that you don't want to be on the ground in a street fight, however, a lot of times the fight ends up on the ground whether you want it to or not. If you want to bring the fight back to standing, you will need to know ground technique to get back up.


    I definately agree but learning one martial art well enough for it to be effective is time consuming as is; let alone learning two. For learning a single art, Muay Thai is the way to go. If you really work at your clinch fighting, you won't end up on the ground that easily.

    The stand up fighters with good clinchs are doing really well in UFC and Pride right now. Anderson Silva killed Rich Franklin that way. I know there are a few other examples lately but I can't think right now.

    If you can, find a club that teachs MMA as opposed to a single art. These clubs tend to have athletes that are much more serious about training and fighting. It's one thing to learn stand up and ground fighting seperately but it's much better to learn them together in an environment that is focusing on MMA. Certain BBJ techniques, for example, will get your head pounded in if you add striking like you would find in a street fight. Also, a lot of ground fighters have no problem being on their back. This is not where you want to be in a street fight no matter how good you are. An MMA club will focus more so on keeping dominate position on the ground and using strikes to beat your opponent instead of submissions.
     
  10. mizanation

    mizanation Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    927
    Joined:
    May 8, 2006
    again, totally agree. i go to the only mma gym in new york city, so we train everything--muay thai, clinch, wrestling, subs, ground and pound. not everyone has this luxury.

    yes, muay thai clinch is killing everyone right now. here is the biggest current example: vanderlei silva. i don't think anyone has shown the effectiveness of muay thai clinch better than him. randy couture also had a great clinch (but greco-roman clinch) and he destroyed people with that using his dirty boxing.

    if you can learn only one art--muay thai is the way to go.

    i train bjj because it's like my trump card. if i'm up against a decent striker with a lot of weight on me (which there are many in new york), i'm not going to stand with him. when i'm up against a guy like that, i close the distance, get inside control and take it to the ground where i can get knee on belly or strike from mount or side control. it's a lot easier to punch the guy when he is lying on the ground--at least for me. i'm not even thinking of submission and i'm definitely not trying to play guard.

    guard is great in the gym, but i don't like being there against an agressive opponent. and it's definitely a last resort when striking is involved.

    btw, where did you train?
     
  11. chobochobo

    chobochobo Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,411
    Joined:
    May 7, 2006
    Location:
    Hong Kong
    I did Taekwondo for a while but stopped basically I can't afford to damage my hands, even scratches/lacerations would be bad. Board breaking was fun though.
     
  12. Brian SD

    Brian SD Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,760
    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2004
    Location:
    Tokyo
    really enjoying this discussion btw DucatiCole / mizanation.

    makes me want to sign up for an aforementioned mma gym.

    Oh well, I will have fun doing Judo (starts tomorrow!) and look forward to some MMA training in Japan.
     
  13. mizanation

    mizanation Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    927
    Joined:
    May 8, 2006
    judo is great, man. depending on the gym, you won't be disappointed. if possible, go to a place that has a few olympians, or olympic hopefuls. those are the gyms that take training the most seriously. i've seen some judo places that were horrible. then again, i've seen some places that had a dozen olympians on the mat. watch their workout, you'll know if they are good or not.

    judo has two aspects. one is "tachiwaza" ("standing techniques") which involves throwing, the second is "newaza" (literally "laying techniques" but meaning is closer to "ground techniques") which involves joint locks, chokes and pins.

    don't worry about not training mma, man. you are doing judo, which involves a lot of work in the clinch range--the same range we were talking about. the difference between Muay Thai's clinch and Judo's clinch is that in MT, you are using the clinch to control your opponent and deliver knees whereas in Judo, you are using the clinch to throw or drop your opponent to the ground. like i mentioned before, when your opponent is on the ground, it's a lot easier to hit him or get away from him. not to mention, a good throw will drop both your bodyweights on his head, shoulder or neck.

    two great mma competitors whose basis are in judo are: fedor emalienenko (the number one fighter in the world) and karo parisyan (ufc contender). most of the top bjj fighters also train in judo (most of the gracies, ronaldo "jacare" souza--all have excellent judo). *edit* oops, i forgot a couple others: hidehiko yoshida, kazuhiro nakamura, hayato "mach" sakurai, pawel nastula, yoshihiro akiyama.......

    so, nothing to worry about, man! you're in good company.
     
  14. Tck13

    Tck13 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,749
    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2006
    Location:
    Philly
    Low kicks are really valuable and I can't count the number of times I've kicked someone, who doesn't fight, in the legs only to have them drop both their hands as a reaction leaving themselves wide open. Also, you can usually kick someone from outside their punching range. The other thing Thai fighting teachs you is the clinch. A lot of fights end up with one person hanging onto the other one. From here, you can throw some knees and do some serious damage.

    The thing I found that makes Muay Thai so effective is that it is fairly simple. You learn the basic punches, kicks, knees, elbows, defenses etc then drill them and condition your body until they become effective.


    I just learned to do some "clinching" last week and it is a lot of fun... It's amazing how much control you can have over someone else if you get on the "inside" of them.
     
  15. Brian SD

    Brian SD Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,760
    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2004
    Location:
    Tokyo
    Just got back from the class and DAMN that's fun.

    My club's classes are split in half, tachi and newa. The teacher says officially they compete in Judo tournaments, but the club is a Judo/Jiu Jitsu club.

    Already got into doing throws, pins, and squirming out of them.. The guys here train 100%. I can definitely see a lot of potential improvement. He told me he wants me to start competing next month. [​IMG] [​IMG]

    damn though. [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  16. cmrocks

    cmrocks Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    639
    Joined:
    May 3, 2006
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    I trained with Toshido Fighting Arts out of Kelowna, BC. David Lea is the instructor. If you are familiar with Sherdog, you can look up their team and see some of the fighters for yourself. They have a pretty impressive track record. I've trained with Rory MacDonald, Tim Jenson, Bob Shabaga, Jason Towns, Gary Wright, Mike Adams and David Lea. As far as I know, none of them have competed in UFC or Pride as of yet (they have competed in King of the Cage) but I wouldn't be surprised to see that happen in the next few years.
     
  17. skalogre

    skalogre Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,324
    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2006
    Just got back from the class and DAMN that's fun.

    My club's classes are split in half, tachi and newa. The teacher says officially they compete in Judo tournaments, but the club is a Judo/Jiu Jitsu club.

    Already got into doing throws, pins, and squirming out of them.. The guys here train 100%. I can definitely see a lot of potential improvement. He told me he wants me to start competing next month. [​IMG] [​IMG]

    damn though. [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]


    Hey Brian, what dojo is this? Sounds a lot like a dojo my brother used to attend.
     
  18. mizanation

    mizanation Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    927
    Joined:
    May 8, 2006
    I trained with Toshido Fighting Arts out of Kelowna, BC. David Lea is the instructor. If you are familiar with Sherdog, you can look up their team and see some of the fighters for yourself. They have a pretty impressive track record. I've trained with Rory MacDonald, Tim Jenson, Bob Shabaga, Jason Towns, Gary Wright, Mike Adams and David Lea. As far as I know, none of them have competed in UFC or Pride as of yet (they have competed in King of the Cage) but I wouldn't be surprised to see that happen in the next few years.

    Cool, man. Canada is producing some great fighters right now--just look at GSP, the crow, cote, etc...

    I train at Ronin Athletics in NYC which is the New York branch of the Straight Blast Gym (same camp as Forrest Griffin The Ultimate Fighter champ, Rory Singer TUF competitor). my coach is christian montes, purple belt under matt thornton and mma competitor. we just moved to a brand new space close to times square, so if you're ever in NYC, come through and train with us, man.
     
  19. mizanation

    mizanation Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    927
    Joined:
    May 8, 2006
    Just got back from the class and DAMN that's fun.

    My club's classes are split in half, tachi and newa. The teacher says officially they compete in Judo tournaments, but the club is a Judo/Jiu Jitsu club.

    Already got into doing throws, pins, and squirming out of them.. The guys here train 100%. I can definitely see a lot of potential improvement. He told me he wants me to start competing next month. [​IMG] [​IMG]

    damn though. [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]


    glad you liked it man. in the spirit of style forum, i trained a little judo at the gym today. [​IMG]

    have fun competing, i'm sure you miss it from your taekwondo days.
     
  20. Tck13

    Tck13 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,749
    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2006
    Location:
    Philly
    glad you liked it man. in the spirit of style forum, i trained a little judo at the gym today. [​IMG]

    have fun competing, i'm sure you miss it from your taekwondo days.


    One of my instructers fought on "Friday Night Fights" at the Church St. gym in Manhattan. Does that sound familiar?
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by