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Cool furniture, design objects and desiderata

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by gdl203, Oct 22, 2008.

  1. ethanm

    ethanm Well-Known Member

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    That chair would be perfect if it had a cupholder.
     
    2 people like this.
  2. sugarbutch

    sugarbutch Well-Known Member

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    This is my question about most factory-made modern furniture...
     
  3. archetypal_yuppie

    archetypal_yuppie Well-Known Member

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    How else would they get you to like it a lot?
     
    2 people like this.
  4. Medwed

    Medwed Well-Known Member

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    Only first chair was a brilliant design, later , after 1000s of identical chairs it is a production cost + marketing product placements + this and that plus artificial scarcity.
    To put it another way it is a lot like original painting vs. 113/1500 print. Print should be cheap and the more you print the cheaper it should get. May be I am missing something but that is what my feeling is.
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2015
  5. sugarbutch

    sugarbutch Well-Known Member

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    Who's an IP lawyer here? Are these things covered by copyright, trade dress, patent? In any case, for something designed in 1965 (?), shouldn't it be in the public domain by now?
     
  6. Find Finn

    Find Finn Well-Known Member

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    In most countries, no.
     
  7. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Well-Known Member

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    They're often licensed to the producers by a foundation.

    Safe to say there is a bit more effort involved in making one of these over printing lithographs. Asking about the price is a bit redundant, it was never intended to be cheap.

    I have a book called Poul Kjaerholm Furniture Architect that has elevated my appreciation of the work involved. Simple design is often incredibly difficult to execute because there are so many situations which then involve expert workmanship.

    This stuff is not simply stamped out by a machine, they often incorporate many subtle details that require handwork.
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2015
  8. LeatherBoot

    LeatherBoot Well-Known Member

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    Ordered this Nemo lamp today. Fingers crossed my electrician can make it work with HomeWorks.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Well-Known Member

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    Isn't that what the ground is for? The design is nice against a white wall in a picture, but I find it is too self conscious in most settings.

    I would blow my homeworks up if given the chance. I tried to convince my electrician to go to a manual slide dimmer in the new place but had to compromise on some technology. Nemo makes lovely lights. We just got the Calla.
     
  10. Kaplan

    Kaplan Well-Known Member

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    AFAIK the wicker used here isn't factory made, but done here: http://www.endelaveflet.dk/index.php/produkter (sorry, site not in English).

    I saw a program about this place, where I believe it was mentioned that the wicker for the PK 20 and 24 is only made there, though I may be remembering that wrong.
     
  11. gomestar

    gomestar Well-Known Member

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    PK24 + google is hilarious
     
  12. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for posting this.
     
  13. StephenHero

    StephenHero Well-Known Member

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    Caning is nauseatingly expensive by itself for a dinky dinner chair, but I would guess that the chaise's particularly dense caning and its continuous length over such a big surface area makes it exponentially more expensive and difficult to manufacturer. Considering it requires pretty significant strength to do by hand, and requires such a high level of craft to prevent incongruencies in the texture over such a long and visible continuous weave, I'm guessing they have a fairly high number of chairs that don't pass quality control.

    Another issue is whether the legs are separate and joined with a welded bar or whether they're both cut from the same plate of steel and then precisely bent. I'd have to guess that forming them from a single plate of steel in order to eliminate a few visible welds would produce far more waste. But to make it less practical, there's the possibility that the chair is formed from a solid stainless steel plate rather than cold-rolled steel that is annealed to a stainless finish after bending and/or welding. Considering stainless steel is more difficult to both cut and bend, and is composed of more expensive chromium and nickel in the volume of that waste, you're adding some significant costs for the luxury of an entirely stainless steel frame that wouldn't be prone to surface defects that might reveal the shortcut of a basic annealed finish. It looks like this is almost 0-gauge plate steel (.3125") and stainless steel plates rarely come in thicker gauges that 5 or 6 (about 1/8"), so it would require some effort. It'd be the equivalent of building a solid, foot-thick, marble-faced wall entirely out of Carrara marble blocks for the purpose of not wanting to get caught using cement blocks on the interior. I don't know if that's the case here, but if one wanted to avoid all shortcuts for a single piece of furniture, that's the lengths they could easily find themselves going to.

    Another issue is whether they manufacture it with the original processes specified from 1965, which would eliminate a great number of newer cutting techniques for the steel. I don't think most of the modern water routers and lasers for sheet steel came about until the late 70's. The more you think about it, the easier it becomes to see how they could spend a lifetime making these things.

    FWIW, possible inefficiencies aside, I think it's stunning.
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2015
  14. twistoffat

    twistoffat Well-Known Member

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    Thonet (see rocking sofa 7500)stole the idea(took inspiration) from Eileen gray who in turn had the idea stolen by Corbusier who inturn had the idea stolen by Kjaerholm
    who was bought out by fritz hansen. Four designers and Fritz Hansen later hey presto you have a 10k plus price Tag.
     
  15. Medwed

    Medwed Well-Known Member

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    I doubt Thonet stole it from anyone, since his company pretty much invented modular furniture based on his bent-wood knowhow. Not to mention that the rocking chair was produced before that Irish woman was even born.
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2015
  16. Find Finn

    Find Finn Well-Known Member

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    Fun fact Fritz Hansen is owned by a fund, which also owns part of cigaret manufacturer and an amusement park, so they will burn right through your wallet.
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2015
  17. apropos

    apropos Well-Known Member

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    Is it comfortable? It does not look comfortable.

    All that talk about cane and the esoteric techniques needed to form the steel parts (come on) sounds like rationalisation to me.
     
    1 person likes this.
  18. Foxhound

    Foxhound Well-Known Member

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    Reminds me of the couches at New Dehli airport.
     
  19. twistoffat

    twistoffat Well-Known Member

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    Thonet was working with Corbusier who was Jealous of Eileen Grays 1027 house and furniture. She started working with tubular steel after been influenced by Mart stam who invented the first free swinging chair in 1926 the same time Gray started to build the E1027 house which Corbusier so coveted. Corbusier pinched Thonet chair development and had even contacted Peugeot bikes to start production (which they turned down). Call it thieving or inspiration but it was common knowledge that Gray despised Corbusier after his actions and he made no attempt for years to admit many works were Grays and not his own.
    Yes the Thonet was first produced in the late 1880´s and Gray was born in the late 1870´s but they were looking at an adaption with Corbusier till he did a runner.
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2015
  20. Medwed

    Medwed Well-Known Member

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    This has little to do with the rocking sofa you have been talking about in your previous post. Thonet came up with his designs when both designers were not alive or in their infancy. Le Carb did not design any of Thonet pieces , it is marketing gimmick to call one armchair Le Carb.
    First rocking chair around 1860
    First rocking sofa around 1883
    Did Thonet steal these designs from the people that were not yet alive?
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2015

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