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CG's Artisan & Farmstead Cheese Threak

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by Cary Grant, Oct 11, 2012.

  1. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Well-Known Member

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    Day #16: O'Banon - Indiana
    It's Capriole Farms' riff on the French Banon à la feuille, except that this one uses leaves soaked in bourbon.

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  2. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Well-Known Member

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    Day #17" Rumiano Smoked Dry Jack - Crescent City, CA

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  3. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Well-Known Member

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    Day #18: Bleu Mont Cheddar, Wisconsin
    Brilliantly good, in the style of English farmhouse cheddar. Built his own cave on the farm for aging.

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    Last edited: Oct 18, 2012
  4. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Well-Known Member

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  5. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Well-Known Member

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    I had a Pennyroyal (the people from Navarro Vineyards) Bollie's Mollies (I swear one of the reasons I don't eat a lot of American cheese is the fakakta naming.) It was really nice. Quite bright in a balanced way.
     
  6. edmorel

    edmorel Well-Known Member

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    So I picked up the Montgomery, the guy tells me the blue mold in the corner is not an issue and I can actually eat it if I like, will I die? Also, what type of wine will add to the cheese experience?

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    Last edited: Oct 20, 2012
  7. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Well-Known Member

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    I generally drink whatever I was drinking before the cheese. That said, I don't like very tannic wines with Montgomery's or Parmesan. They are already slightly drying on the palate, but in a good way. With tannins it can feel like you are eating cotton balls. Eat the blue. It's part of what makes that cheese great. If you like beer, it probably goes very well.
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2012
  8. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Well-Known Member

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    Eat it all! Though not the rind... May have a bit of bandage remaining.

    Beer and English cheddar are made for each other.
    Stay away from the monster-hoppy styles. Something wheaty can work. Nutty ales, brown ales.... I'm not a stout fan but particularly dislike stouts and cheddar. Doppels on the creamy side can be nice.

    I don't do wines and cheddars all that often but if they are fruity and not really dry they can work. A softer Italian Rosso can be nice.

    Do you drink Port? Vintage can be good with cheddar.

    I just came back from a great 48 hours in Wisconsin and brought back two rare treats I'll review soon.

    I met the maker of Marieke Gouda, Marieke Penterman and scored a big chunk of her six year Gouda. First batch she ever made and oldest ever released. Deep butterscotch flavor.

    Met Andy Hatch, maker of Pleasant Ridge Reserve plus Mike, the farmer that created it. It's Pleasant Ridge Reserve's 5th birthday. Andy made two enormous 80lb wheels of PR and aged a year. Cracked the wheel yesterday. The cheese is very different. Sweet, fudge and more moist. Almost a different cheese.

    And met Chris Roelli, maker of Dunbarton Blue, Red Rock and Kingsley cheddar.
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2012
  9. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Well-Known Member

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    Have not had-
    yeah, the naming... Americans and marketing sometimes...
     
  10. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Well-Known Member

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    Day #20: Tumbleweed - Pennsylvania
    Raw cow's milk and kosher.

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  11. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Well-Known Member

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    Had it again last night and it was awful. Either they need more consistency or the window for eating is very short.
     
  12. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Well-Known Member

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    Day #21: Teahive & Seahive - Utah
    Basically the same cheese, two different rubs. Neither particularly interesting.

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    Last edited: Oct 21, 2012
  13. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Well-Known Member

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    I reposted an article about them a littlw while back- here it is at Culture.

    They're only been making a few months.

    Is Bollie's a soft-rpiened? I know it's a sheep/goat blend. Guessing it should be fairly lactic/citric? What was different between them?
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2012
  14. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Well-Known Member

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    Ah- I see: Bollies Mollies

    I might guess the bad one was bitter/ammonia? or was it just flat?
     
  15. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Well-Known Member

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    Wisconsin originals from Friday- all cheeses are relatively new/recent in the American movement:

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  16. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Well-Known Member

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    The first one had a very nice acidity which was perfect for quite a hot day. The texture was slightly crumbly and the rind had a bit of a mushroom scent. The second was, to me, dead in flavor and aroma, and was a bit waxy in texture. My wife found it soapy.
     
  17. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Well-Known Member

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    Day #22: Rupert -Consider Bardwell Farm, Vermont
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    Last edited: Oct 22, 2012
  18. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Well-Known Member

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    Hey Ed- how was the cheddar??
     
  19. edmorel

    edmorel Well-Known Member

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    I can't guote your post CG, I've been having problems with that, the PM and the "like" functions. Anyway, I just had a nibble as I was eating a raw milk Parmigiano all weekened (Eataly's house brand 36 month aged, I love it but it always upsets my stomach :lookaround:) . The nibble I had tasted creamy and mild, relative to the irish supermarket cheddar that I always get (Kerry's I think?, They also do a butter). It didn't taste as "industrialized" if that makes any sense. I plan on eating it tonight so will let you know my full thoughts.
     
  20. Cary Grant

    Cary Grant Well-Known Member

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    Cool- That cheddar was probably "Kerrygold".

    Trivia: Kerrygold is the umbrella brand now for marketing Irish dairy products globally- BIG company... the Irish Dairy Board. They recently purchased DPI Foods here in the US which is also an enormous company/distributor here with tens of thousands of products.

    A little larger than James Montgomery's handmade operation ;)
     

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