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Cars We Drive!

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Bert1568, Jul 18, 2006.

  1. bawlin

    bawlin Well-Known Member

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    Try looking at '08 CL65s. Must suck to be the guy who spent $220k new on one of those.
     
  2. gomestar

    gomestar Well-Known Member

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    I've wondered this too, but not just for AMG. I've heard people say "well if the engine can go to 200 mph, then every part must be able to go to 200 mph, and this is where they get expensive" ... ok, but if a part is made to withstand 200 mph but never sees even a fraction of that speed, then why still is reliability still so bad?
     
  3. TimelesStyle

    TimelesStyle Well-Known Member

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    The website still says "handcrafted" engines, so sounds like it. However that doesn't necessarily indicate greater reliability. My Patek has a movement built entirely by hand which has been rebuilt entirely by hand since I've owned it while my Rolex was built largely by robots and hasn't had a single issue (knock on wood).
     
  4. TimelesStyle

    TimelesStyle Well-Known Member

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    If something is designed to be a high performance machine, perhaps reliability would be better if it were used solely as a high performance machine. Perhaps parts intended to propel a car to 200 mph aren't well suited to the stop-and-go, rough road driving, frequent parallel parking, etc. done by those who use these as daily drivers.
     
  5. Find Finn

    Find Finn Well-Known Member

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    The markup on high end cars is 9 times out of 20 for the sake markup, the old RR's used pneumatic suspension from Citroen and the parts would x3 at RR compared to Citroen.
     
  6. bawlin

    bawlin Well-Known Member

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  7. Dogs Bollocks

    Dogs Bollocks Active Member

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    uglier than the BMW of the same ilk.
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. gomestar

    gomestar Well-Known Member

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    this makes no sense at all.
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2014
  9. akatsuki

    akatsuki Well-Known Member

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    Basically high performance means less reliability because you are running closer to the edge of the threshold. Parts aren't engineered to withstand constant 200mph, there are trade-offs in weight and aerodynamics that need to be made just to get there.
     
  10. bawlin

    bawlin Well-Known Member

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    It makes a ton of sense, and this is why a Ferrari with 1,000 miles on the clock runs worse than the same model with 20,000+ miles.

    Cars are meant to be driven. Let that concept, as crazy as it may sound, sink in for a second.
     
  11. gomestar

    gomestar Well-Known Member

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    ohhhh, I get it. Daily driving is really hard on high performance cars, which are really designed to push that 200 mph limit. And pushing that 200 mph limit (or even basic track use) is very hard on brakes, transmissions, high performance tires, engines, turbos, etc.





    :eh:
     
  12. gomestar

    gomestar Well-Known Member

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    this looks like an X6 with Down syndrome.
     
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  13. poena

    poena Well-Known Member

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    1 person likes this.
  14. venividivicibj

    venividivicibj Well-Known Member

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    Clearly cars that can go 200mph arent good at stopping and starting. Apparently when you pay 150k for a benz, they expect you to reach 100mph, and stay there....in perpetuity.



    My original point was, if you're paying that much for a car, they really can't design a car that is reliable, and performance? It is handcrafted blah blah blah, and yet poorly designed still?
     
  15. TimelesStyle

    TimelesStyle Well-Known Member

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    Well, I'm not an engineer, so can't say for sure. I always think that things will achieve optimal performance/longevity when used as intended. For example, a self-winding wristwatch will probably wear better if worn daily so that the oils stay fluid (vs. non-wear, though less an issue with today's synthetics) and the manual winding/setting mechanisms aren't overtaxed (when compared to periodic wear that requires restarting and resetting). Or think of an airliner: on the ground it's incredibly fragile and easily damaged while in the air, flying at 500mph, it can endure very significant forces applied to it.

    So, if parts are designed to be stopped/started once or twice per day, with sustained, high speed runs in between, then I think it's at least possible that those same parts will wear more quickly if stopped/started a half-dozen times per day with periods of both low speed movement and inactivity (stop lights, stupid people on bikes getting in the way, etc.) in between.
     
  16. TimelesStyle

    TimelesStyle Well-Known Member

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    BARF! It (along with the X4 and X6) look like those toy cars you used to get as a kid that you pulled back on, then released and watched them drive over the floor (and spin out or hit the wall). BMW bills its as "Sport Activity Coupes". Who the fuck wants a four-door, AWD coupe with that kind of ground clearance?!?!?! It looks like a 5 Series GT (ugly) and a VW Beetle (uglier) had a few too many drinks one night and this was the result.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2014
  17. gomestar

    gomestar Well-Known Member

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    I do see this point, and I think it's probably quite applicable to non-GT cars like the Zonda or Aventador or Carrera GT (I mention this car since it's so different from other Porche models that can easily rack up city miles). Makes sense.

    But should we apply the same logic to a 5,000 lb 4-door sedan like the S63?
     
  18. Piobaire

    Piobaire Well-Known Member

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    The GLE is news? I mean it's been on my local MB lot for weeks.
     
  19. Pilot

    Pilot Well-Known Member

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    I think it's just the overall stress that high strung engines, like turbo charged AMG engines, endure. Cars that have pretty insane reliability like Formula 1 cars generally have a short shelf life for parts. So yes it will be "reliable" during the time it's actually supposed to be working, but you aren't to expect much out of it afterwards. The S63 engine has almost the same compression ratio as the N54 BMW engine except two turbos thrown in there. So if similar metals and components are used in the AMG engines as in their normal engines (water pumps, pulleys, etc) then I think it's reasonable to assume they'll have a shorter shelf life.

    Having said all that, I do think higher end modern engines should be far more reliable than they are currently. We finally seem to be getting there with normal passenger cars. So it does seem Mercedes is the exception now-a-days with people buying AMG cars expecting them to fall apart. I know in the past higher performance Audis (well, all Audis) seemed to be pretty fragile, but I haven't heard too many complaints about the newer models.
     
  20. TimelesStyle

    TimelesStyle Well-Known Member

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    Is that the GLE? Wasn't there a post somewhere back about MB's new naming scheme, whereby the GL would become the GLS and the ML would become the GLE?

    Either way, ugly as balls.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2014

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